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drinking and bfing

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 8 Replies
After drinking a martini is it safe to bf?
Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:28 AM
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Replies (1-8):
Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:28 AM

no, pump and dump.

mattiehatter
by Mary on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:31 AM

No. Like a pp said pump and dump. There is a product on the market that is like a breast pad, but it has something in it that can detect when there is alcohol present in breast milk and will tell you when it's out.

kiralyn
by on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:31 AM
False. Pump and dump does nothing.

This is completely individual. If you are safe to drive, you are safe to nurse.


Quoting Anonymous:

no, pump and dump.

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:31 AM
It takes about 2-4 hours for it to get out of your system depending on how much you drank. No need to pump and dump. You can find what I just said on kellymom.com
DyerMaker
by Bronze Member on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:32 AM

Depends on how long it has been. If you drink and bf, you should consider the test strips that can test the levels of alcohol in your breast milk Before a feeding.pump and dump, as someone replied, was the golden rule a while back, but now, it has been proven that you don't need to pump and dump. if the strips don't show any alcohol in your system, then life is good. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:33 AM
Breastfeeding and Alcohol

JULY 29, 2011. Posted in: LIFESTYLE CHOICES

By Kelly Bonyata, IBCLC

Guidelines

Current research says that occasional use of alcohol (1-2 drinks) does not appear to be harmful to the nursing baby. Per Hale (2012), “mothers who ingest alcohol in moderate amounts can generally return to breastfeeding as soon as they feel neurologically normal.” The American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Breastfeeding notes: “ingestion of alcoholic beverages should be minimized and limited to an occasional intake but no more than 0.5 g alcohol per kg body weight, which for a 60 kg mother is approximately 2 oz liquor, 8 oz wine, or 2 beers. Nursing should take place 2 hours or longer after the alcohol intake to minimize its concentration in the ingested milk.” Many experts recommend against drinking more than 1-2 drinks per week. There is no need to pump & dump milk after drinking alcohol, other than for mom’s comfort —pumping & dumping does not speed the elimination of alcohol from the milk. Alcohol does not increase milk production, and has been shown to inhibit let-down and decrease milk production (see below). If you’re away from your baby, try to pump as often as baby usually nurses (this is to maintain milk supply, not because of the alcohol). At the very least, pump or hand express whenever you feel uncomfortably full – this will help you to avoid plugged ducts and mastitis.

In general, if you are sober enough to drive, you are sober enough to breastfeed. Less than 2% of the alcohol consumed by the mother reaches her blood and milk. Alcohol peaks in mom’s blood and milk approximately 1/2-1 hour after drinking (but there is considerable variation from person to person, depending upon how much food was eaten in the same time period, mom’s body weight and percentage of body fat, etc.). Alcohol does not accumulate in breastmilk, but leaves the milk as it leaves the blood; so when your blood alcohol levels are back down, so are your milk alcohol levels.

Always keep in mind the baby’s age when considering the effect of alcohol. A newborn has a very immature liver, so minute amounts of alcohol would be more of a burden. Up until around 3 months of age, infants detoxify alcohol at around half the rate of an adult. An older baby or toddler can metabolize the alcohol more quickly.

Effects of alcohol on breastfeeding and the breastfed baby

Alcohol does not increase milk production. In fact, babies nurse more frequently but take in less milk in the 3-4 hours after mom has had a drink, and one study showed a 23% decrease in milk volume with one drink (Mennella & Beauchamp 1991, 1993; Mennella 1997, 1999). 2+ drinks may inhibit let-down (Coiro et al 1992; Cobo 1974). One study showed changes in the infant’s sleep-wake patterning after short-term exposure to small amounts of alcohol in breastmilk — infants whose mothers were light drinkers slept less (Mennella & Gerrish 1998). Daily consumption of alcohol has been shown in the research to increase the risk for slow weight gain in the infant. Daily consumption of alcohol (1+ drinks daily) has been associated with a decrease in gross motor development (Little et al 1989).

Additional information
MumsTheWord571
by on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:35 AM
This. Pumping and dumping is antiquated information. Safe to drive is safe to nurse. Less than 5% of all alcohol consumption goes to your supply and metabolizes from your milk as it does your blood.

The ONLY reason to "pump and dump" is if it is not safe to drive (you're drunk or tipsy) and ate engorged.




Quoting kiralyn:

False. Pump and dump does nothing.



This is completely individual. If you are safe to drive, you are safe to nurse.




Quoting Anonymous:

no, pump and dump.


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 17, 2013 at 3:46 AM
Thanks everyone. I drank half a martini over two hrs ago so i just nursed my baby. Thank you guys
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