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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Teachers and what we hate about you! UPDATE

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

Ok, perhaps hate is too strong a word. I will forfeit hate, and, replace with (strongly) dislike about parents.

Our job is to teach your children, according to the curriculum given for the grade being taught.

We aim to target all the different exceptionalities as much as possible. That is, the good teachers will try their utmost to do this.

What we hope parents will do to help their children is do the follow up at home. Read with them. Go through the homework with them. This will help kids to process and retain what they learned in school. If they do this regularly, even if they forgot about a test one day, they would still do great! Don't teach them to only study for tests...that isn't enough. Encourage them to be lifelong learners, by giving a damn about their education. Teachers can only do their part...parents need to help too!

Update: if all you took away from this is that I didn't give you a 1 to 10 detailing what I dislike about parents, you are completely missing the point. Read between the lines. The title is supposed to catch your attention! 

Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 18, 2013 at 8:53 PM
Replies (541-550):
Ecobabyz
by on Feb. 28, 2013 at 8:16 PM

Good for you :) I do agree, the time most parents spend with homework is sufficient to teach a child yourself. It takes much less time to teach one or two kids than a disruptive classroom of 25-30. 

Yes, some teachers are genuinely messed up, but there are a lot of good ones two. Unfortunately they are just part of a very broken system that thinks that by sticking the kids inside a school for 10+ hours a day is a good idea for 'learning'. 

 Anastasia B, Editor at Eco-Babyz

c_ramirez8606
by on Mar. 2, 2013 at 2:28 AM

I get where your coming from. My little cousin is in Kinder and her parents don't do anything with her. My son is also in Kinder and I do what I can. And I make him read almost everyday.

SpiritWish
by Member on Mar. 26, 2013 at 12:49 PM


To be honest, I'm absolutely terrified that as a new teacher I'm going to screw up. I've also had personal dealings with CPS and watched as my children failed in school during their captivity with the government... as soon as they came home though, all 3 of my kids soared to the honor roll and are for the most part quite successful because now they know that no matter what happens, they have the love and support of their family. It's heartbreaking that there are so many babies out there struggling in school because of their situations whether it's neglectful parents or it's the system. :(

Quoting Anonymous:

That's a good point. I've never come across too many foster kids in my school, I don't have experience with that.

Quoting SpiritWish:

I will be starting my student teaching sometime next school year. If I didn't say that I was a bit intimidated, I'd be lying. I've had teachers tell me that my kids do quite well in school. I push my kids at home. I want them to do their very best and once they get their work done, everything else will pretty much fall into place. Another thing to take into consideration... as teachers, we have to deal with a tremendous amount of foster kids. It certainly isn't our place to tell anyone how to raise their own child but don't you think that with the rise in CPS cases and the fact that many of these children are being abused in foster care, isn't it possible that their learning problems aren't because their parents aren't helping them but rather because they're so miserable in their foster homes that they just don't care?




Anonymous
by Anonymous on Mar. 26, 2013 at 1:45 PM
1 mom liked this

Exceptionalities? That's not even a word, I can't even figure out what word you meant to use there. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Mar. 26, 2013 at 5:51 PM

It is a word. Just because you've never heard the term doesn't mean it does not exist.

Quoting Anonymous:

Exceptionalities? That's not even a word, I can't even figure out what word you meant to use there. 


Anonymous
by Anonymous on Mar. 26, 2013 at 7:53 PM

No, it's a term that the education system made up. Find me a link to an online dictionary that doesn't just redirect you to Exceptional and I'll admit I'm wrong.


Quoting Anonymous:

It is a word. Just because you've never heard the term doesn't mean it does not exist.

Quoting Anonymous:

Exceptionalities? That's not even a word, I can't even figure out what word you meant to use there. 




Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Mar. 26, 2013 at 8:58 PM

Would you prefer going back to retard, stupid, slow?? Then switch to genious, gifted, nerd, when talking about another set of students?

There are too many different children in the classroom...reaching the different exceptionalities is a thing of the past 15 years. I'm not sure children were identified as this or that before...but they are now. Teachers are being trained to reach all the kids as best they can.

word, term, theory blah blah blah...it has been given meaning.

Quoting Anonymous:

No, it's a term that the education system made up. Find me a link to an online dictionary that doesn't just redirect you to Exceptional and I'll admit I'm wrong.


Quoting Anonymous:

It is a word. Just because you've never heard the term doesn't mean it does not exist.

Quoting Anonymous:

Exceptionalities? That's not even a word, I can't even figure out what word you meant to use there. 





Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 26, 2013 at 9:05 PM
What school day is 10+ hours?


Quoting Ecobabyz:

Good for you :) I do agree, the time most parents spend with homework is sufficient to teach a child yourself. It takes much less time to teach one or two kids than a disruptive classroom of 25-30. 

Yes, some teachers are genuinely messed up, but there are a lot of good ones two. Unfortunately they are just part of a very broken system that thinks that by sticking the kids inside a school for 10+ hours a day is a good idea for 'learning'. 


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Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 26, 2013 at 9:11 PM
Public schools in our area have smaller classes than our private schools.

K classes are sitting at 16 or less.


Quoting Anonymous:The is the disadvantage of being in a public school; no one on one attention



>I am not a teacher, but I try to get this through my DH's head all the time. To be fair, our first grader DOES have an unusual amount of homework and I know he gets frustrated sometimes that we spend our entire evening at the table rather than doing family things or letting kids be kids. He thinks that if they send home that much work they must not be doing much during the day and when our kid falls behind or gets a low grade on a test he thinks its because the teacher doesn't know how to teach. I know over the next few years his mind will change, I think he just doesn't get how little attention can be given one on one when you have a class of 20+ first graders.
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Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 26, 2013 at 9:25 PM
Huh??? What are you talking about?

Some states have masters degrees mandatory for all teachers within a certain number of years of teaching.

That is not true for my state, but in our elementary school, teachers holding masters degrees is not uncommon at all.


Quoting Anonymous:

I was mid way into a phd, but marriage, kids etc have become life now:) I thought my intensive study, would be an asset to the school and kids. You would be hard pressed to find an elementary teacher with a graduate degree. I'm able to do this because my dh earns well enough that if I didn't want to be there I not have to.

Quoting Anonymous:

One of the biggest reasons I quit teaching four years ago was parents who don't want to help. I can't teach your child much if you're letting him do whatever he wants at home and making excuses for his behavior.



I had about 25-30 kids per class, 6-7 classes per day. So in a perfect world where I don't have to take attendance, do any disciplining, do any teaching at all, etc., that leaves me about 12 minutes per day of one-on-one time with each student. It's just not enough to make nearly as big an impact as parents. Yes, teachers do make a big difference, but they aren't miracle workers.



Teachers are expected to teach a huge group of kids (all with different personalities, abilities, learning styles, etc.) and actually achieve progress each day when a lot of the kids have very unfavorable home lives.



A lot of behaviors kids deal with out of kids and parents would be considered criminal, but teachers are encouraged "not to ruin kids' futures" by pressing charges in a lot if situations where they probably should. Teachers are expected to always be the bigger person in any given situation an have to act professional at times when the most ridiculous situations occur. I was happy to hear on NPR yesterday that some states are putting laws in effect to protect teachers from online bullying. I can't even count the number of colleagues whose students have made up fake Facebook pages, blogs, etc., using the teachers' names and photos to post ridiculous, embarrassing, untrue stuff.



The way teachers are treated in our culture is just out of control. I realize they don't all deserve respect, but a great majority of then are good people jut trying to help kids who mostly don't want to learn.



All that being said, I believe in creating your own happiness, which is why I have a master's degree and teaching and principal certification in four state (due to moves) that I will likely never use again. :) Follow your dreams (of not being harassed for doing your job well). ;)



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