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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

did I cause my babies problems? :(

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 15 Replies
My dd had accommodative esotropia, an eye problem. I am wondering if I caused it, and feel horrible. She was born healthy, but at 3 days, I put her down on my bed, and thought she would be fine because she can't move yet. She feel of and hit the floor. I an wondering if her falling at such a young age could have hurt her brain or eyes and caused this.
Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:24 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:34 AM
Its possible, does anyone in your family or Dh family have it? It could be hereditary.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:44 AM
My grandma and an aunt have similar problems, I don't know if it is the same diagnosis, I don't believe they got it checked.

Quoting Anonymous:

Its possible, does anyone in your family or Dh family have it? It could be hereditary.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:50 AM
Oh ok, it could be hereditary but no way to know for sure, don't beat yourself up over it :-)


Quoting Anonymous:

My grandma and an aunt have similar problems, I don't know if it is the same diagnosis, I don't believe they got it checked.



Quoting Anonymous:

Its possible, does anyone in your family or Dh family have it? It could be hereditary.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:51 AM
Thank you!

Quoting Anonymous:

Oh ok, it could be hereditary but no way to know for sure, don't beat yourself up over it :-)




Quoting Anonymous:

My grandma and an aunt have similar problems, I don't know if it is the same diagnosis, I don't believe they got it checked.





Quoting Anonymous:

Its possible, does anyone in your family or Dh family have it? It could be hereditary.

Rach91o
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:57 AM
i dont think its your fault maybe its inherited or maybe they never checked before that happened..? dont beat yourself up about it being a mum is a learning process if we didnt try things we would never learn.. I wish you and your family all the best.. :-D
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 19, 2013 at 10:01 AM
1 mom liked this
Thank you so much!

Quoting Rach91o:

i dont think its your fault maybe its inherited or maybe they never checked before that happened..? dont beat yourself up about it being a mum is a learning process if we didnt try things we would never learn.. I wish you and your family all the best.. :-D
kirita323
by Gold Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 10:03 AM

I doubt it. Babies are meant to withstand a lot. Was she knocked out?

Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Feb. 19, 2013 at 10:07 AM
1 mom liked this

http://www.pedseye.com/strabismus_esotropia.htm

Esotropia (Crossed Eyes)

Esotropia is a type of strabismus or eye misalignment. In esotropia, the eyes are "crossed"; that is, while one eye looks straight ahead, the other eye is turned in toward the nose. This inward deviation of the eyes can begin in infancy or later in childhood.

Congenital (Infantile) Esotropia

Congenital (infantile) esotropia is a type of strabismus which first appears sometime within the first six months of life. This esotropia may be present at birth but often develops within the first few months. In the first months of life, it is common for the eyes to intermittently become misaligned. If a misalignment of the eyes persists after the first few months, a consultation with a pediatric ophthalmologist is required.

Child with infantile esotropia before and after eye muscle surgery.

One to two percent of children have congenital esotropia. Though the cause is unknown, it is thought that the underlying problem lies in the brain's inability to coordinate the movement of the eyes. These children will often alternate their vision between the two eyes by sometimes crossing one eye, and at other times the other. Some children will constantly cross the same eye. This is often an indication that amblyopia, or decreased vision, is developing in one eye.

Treatment of congenital esotropia usually requires eye muscle surgery. Before surgery is performed, other factors must be considered. If amblyopia has developed in one eye, this poor vision must be treated right away. This is accomplished by patching the better eye to force the brain to use the eye with poorer vision. Though this will not correct the eye crossing, it will equalize the vision which improves the prognosis for a successful outcome from surgery. The presence of farsightedness must also be detected prior to an operation. Though this is an uncommon cause of esotropia in infants, glasses must be tried when there is significant farsightedness present as glasses, alone may diminish the eye crossing. (See photo below and Accommodative Esotropia)

This six month old child with esotropia measured to be significantly farsighted. With the appropriate glasses in place, the eye crossing resolved.

Children do not outgrow infantile esotropia. Surgical correction is usually recommended between six and nine months of age. The reasons for correction go beyond the obvious drastic improvement in the child's appearance. When the eyes are misaligned in childhood, binocular vision, or the ability of the brain to use the two eyes together, does not develop. Early alignment of the eyes allows for the development of the brain’s ability to experience normal depth perception and fine 3-dimensional vision. Achieving this binocularity at a young age will also afford a child the best chance of maintaining normal ocular alignment throughout life. Additionally, a child with good ocular alignment is at decreased risk for developing amblyopia.

Even after successful surgery, periodic follow-up is necessary to detect associated eye problems. Vertical misalignments of the eye, especially when looking to the side (see photo below), recurrent eye crossing and amblyopia may occur months, years or decades after successful eye muscle surgery.

Despite successful surgical correction of congenital esotropia in infancy, years later, this child developed a vertical imbalance of the eyes in both right and left gaze.

Accommodative Esotropia

Accommodative esotropia is a form of strabismus due to a need for farsighted glasses (see the Accommodative Esotropia section for more information).

Acquired Non-Accommodative Esotropia

Esotropia can occur after infancy and not be responsive to farsighted glasses, thereby not falling into the categories of congenital (infantile) or accommodative esotropia which are described elsewhere on this web site. Acquired esotropia can have multiple causes. Most common are children who have been farsighted for awhile and have not had glasses, or children who were initially responsive to glasses but later developed an additional eye crossing even when wearing the proper glasses. All children with acquired eye crossing require a prompt evaluation by a pediatric ophthalmologist. Eye muscle surgery can correct such deviations and restoration of binocular vision is usually possible.

Pseudoesotropia

Pseudoesotropia refers to the appearance of crossed eyes in a child whose eyes are actually perfectly aligned. This is common in infants and younger children who have a broad, flat bridge of the nose which allows the skin on the inner part of the eyelids to extend over and cover the inner part of the eye. The sclera (the white part of the eye) closest to the nose becomes covered, especially when the child looks toward either side, and a crossed eye appearance is simulated (see photo below). As the face matures and the nasal bridge grows, the skin is pulled forward and away from the eye, thereby eliminating the crossed eye appearance.

Pseudoesotropia as a result of a broad bridge of the nose. This is not a real eye crossing.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Feb. 19, 2013 at 10:08 AM
No. She was born with it. She will likely need glasses when she is older.
black_sun99
by Bronze Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 10:09 AM

I seriously doubt the fall caused it.  I have crossed eyes and never fell and my dughter had crossed eyes but grew out of it.  There are many babies that roll off a bed that don't end up with it either.  Don't beat yourself up sweetie.

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