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Is there a nurse or dietitian out there? (Question Re: Triglycerides)

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 24 Replies

Question for you: I had a recent blood test that measured a bunch of stuff. My Tryglycerides level was 165 and considered "borderline," although my LDL (bad cholesterol) at 66 was considered in the normal range and my HDL (good cholesterol) at 3.4 was considered in the normal range. How can this be?  Aren't they intertwined somehow?  (Maybe I'm just misunderstanding this whole thing.)

Also, I'm pretty excited that as a "pescetarian" my protein and iron levels are EXCELLENT...without the use of red meat or pork or chicken/turkey.

My calcium level is slightly low, as well as my Vitamin D levels.  But I live near Canada, so I figured this time of year my Vitamin D would be lower than normal.

But my potassium levels and sodium levels are great.

I could stand to exercise a few more days per week, but I'm too busy.

Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 19, 2013 at 5:33 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 19, 2013 at 5:39 PM

Bump.

itsm3
by Platinum Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 6:44 PM
1 mom liked this

while your LDL levels fall in the normal range, it's at the higher end of spectrum (average is about 200 and anything above will put you at high risk for coronary diseases/high cholesterol etc) that's why your doc said you were borderline.  also, your HDL levels are really low which also puts you at risk (a good range is to fall close to 60mg/dL.  the balance of the two is what determines how "healthy" your heart/arteries are and you have a pretty high LDL and very low LDL therefore you are borderline.  if your LDL were any higher, you would be considered "at risk".

lower your cholesterol through a healthy diet -- eat oatmeal at least once a day, followed by lots of fresh fruits, veggies, lean meats (avoid red  meat), plenty of water and whole grains.  healthy fats are good for you too - they are great for raising your HDL levels as are eggs ( eat the whites only).  incorporate exercise and accelerate this process. 

vitamin D have been proven to protect the body against disease so take vitamin D supplement or drops on a regular basis. 


Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 19, 2013 at 6:51 PM

 Thanks for responding!  I appreciate it.

I'm vegetarian, so these numbers confuse me even further.  I do eat oatmeal about 4 times a week.  Steel cut from the organic food store with 100% pure maple syrup.

We don't eat meat.  Once a week, we eat fish.

I also take a daily women's multi-vitamin.

So honestly, I was really perplexed when I got my numbers back.

Back when I was a meat eater ( a few years ago I had this same test), and my levels were actually better.  Weird!

 EDIt:  also, I'm 5'3' and 127 pounds. 

Quoting itsm3:

while your LDL levels fall in the normal range, it's at the higher end of spectrum (average is about 200 and anything above will put you at high risk for coronary diseases/high cholesterol etc) that's why your doc said you were borderline.  also, your HDL levels are really low which also puts you at risk (a good range is to fall close to 60mg/dL.  the balance of the two is what determines how "healthy" your heart/arteries are and you have a pretty high LDL and very low LDL therefore you are borderline.  if your LDL were any higher, you would be considered "at risk".

lower your cholesterol through a healthy diet -- eat oatmeal at least once a day, followed by lots of fresh fruits, veggies, lean meats (avoid red  meat), plenty of water and whole grains.  healthy fats are good for you too - they are great for raising your HDL levels as are eggs ( eat the whites only).  incorporate exercise and accelerate this process. 

vitamin D have been proven to protect the body against disease so take vitamin D supplement or drops on a regular basis. 

 

 

 

denisepeace
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 6:59 PM

What is as pescetarian?

My triglycerides were borderline and I asked the Physicians Assistant what I can do to get them down. She had one  answer "Exercise" that's it!  Nothing else will move that number down.

 

itsm3
by Platinum Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 7:09 PM

can you give me a sample of what you eat from morning to night? and do you exercise?


Quoting Anonymous:

 Thanks for responding!  I appreciate it.

I'm vegetarian, so these numbers confuse me even further.  I do eat oatmeal about 4 times a week.  Steel cut from the organic food store with 100% pure maple syrup.

We don't eat meat.  Once a week, we eat fish.

I also take a daily women's multi-vitamin.

So honestly, I was really perplexed when I got my numbers back.

Back when I was a meat eater ( a few years ago I had this same test), and my levels were actually better.  Weird!

 EDIt:  also, I'm 5'3' and 127 pounds. 

Quoting itsm3:

while your LDL levels fall in the normal range, it's at the higher end of spectrum (average is about 200 and anything above will put you at high risk for coronary diseases/high cholesterol etc) that's why your doc said you were borderline.  also, your HDL levels are really low which also puts you at risk (a good range is to fall close to 60mg/dL.  the balance of the two is what determines how "healthy" your heart/arteries are and you have a pretty high LDL and very low LDL therefore you are borderline.  if your LDL were any higher, you would be considered "at risk".

lower your cholesterol through a healthy diet -- eat oatmeal at least once a day, followed by lots of fresh fruits, veggies, lean meats (avoid red  meat), plenty of water and whole grains.  healthy fats are good for you too - they are great for raising your HDL levels as are eggs ( eat the whites only).  incorporate exercise and accelerate this process. 

vitamin D have been proven to protect the body against disease so take vitamin D supplement or drops on a regular basis. 






PinkButterfly66
by Emerald Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 7:12 PM

Probably because of the saturated fat vs vegetable fat.  Polyunsaturated fats cause inflammation and fats like butter and lard are actually better for you.

Quoting Anonymous:

 Thanks for responding!  I appreciate it.

I'm vegetarian, so these numbers confuse me even further.  I do eat oatmeal about 4 times a week.  Steel cut from the organic food store with 100% pure maple syrup.

We don't eat meat.  Once a week, we eat fish.

I also take a daily women's multi-vitamin.

So honestly, I was really perplexed when I got my numbers back.

Back when I was a meat eater ( a few years ago I had this same test), and my levels were actually better.  Weird!

 EDIt:  also, I'm 5'3' and 127 pounds. 

Quoting itsm3:

while your LDL levels fall in the normal range, it's at the higher end of spectrum (average is about 200 and anything above will put you at high risk for coronary diseases/high cholesterol etc) that's why your doc said you were borderline.  also, your HDL levels are really low which also puts you at risk (a good range is to fall close to 60mg/dL.  the balance of the two is what determines how "healthy" your heart/arteries are and you have a pretty high LDL and very low LDL therefore you are borderline.  if your LDL were any higher, you would be considered "at risk".

lower your cholesterol through a healthy diet -- eat oatmeal at least once a day, followed by lots of fresh fruits, veggies, lean meats (avoid red  meat), plenty of water and whole grains.  healthy fats are good for you too - they are great for raising your HDL levels as are eggs ( eat the whites only).  incorporate exercise and accelerate this process. 

vitamin D have been proven to protect the body against disease so take vitamin D supplement or drops on a regular basis. 





Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 19, 2013 at 7:46 PM
Change your diet too. High sugar, lard, butter, fatty meats, those will cause your triglycerides to soar.
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:03 PM
Vegetable fat??

I'm confused.

I only use extra Virginia olive oil when cooking and real butter, and not too much. I also limit my dairy because it can be fattening. So what polyunsaturated fats are you meaning??


Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Probably because of the saturated fat vs vegetable fat.  Polyunsaturated fats cause inflammation and fats like butter and lard are actually better for you.

Quoting Anonymous:

 Thanks for responding!  I appreciate it.


I'm vegetarian, so these numbers confuse me even further.  I do eat oatmeal about 4 times a week.  Steel cut from the organic food store with 100% pure maple syrup.


We don't eat meat.  Once a week, we eat fish.


I also take a daily women's multi-vitamin.


So honestly, I was really perplexed when I got my numbers back.


Back when I was a meat eater ( a few years ago I had this same test), and my levels were actually better.  Weird!


 EDIt:  also, I'm 5'3' and 127 pounds. 


Quoting itsm3:


while your LDL levels fall in the normal range, it's at the higher end of spectrum (average is about 200 and anything above will put you at high risk for coronary diseases/high cholesterol etc) that's why your doc said you were borderline.  also, your HDL levels are really low which also puts you at risk (a good range is to fall close to 60mg/dL.  the balance of the two is what determines how "healthy" your heart/arteries are and you have a pretty high LDL and very low LDL therefore you are borderline.  if your LDL were any higher, you would be considered "at risk".


lower your cholesterol through a healthy diet -- eat oatmeal at least once a day, followed by lots of fresh fruits, veggies, lean meats (avoid red  meat), plenty of water and whole grains.  healthy fats are good for you too - they are great for raising your HDL levels as are eggs ( eat the whites only).  incorporate exercise and accelerate this process. 


vitamin D have been proven to protect the body against disease so take vitamin D supplement or drops on a regular basis. 









Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:04 PM
Sorry my iPhone is autocorrecting me. Apparently it didn't like virgin.
PinkButterfly66
by Emerald Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 9:09 PM

Monosaturated oil like olive is good.  Corn and soybean oil are polyunsaturated and are B-A-D!  High cholesterol can also be caused by low thyroid.  Our bodies actually NEED cholesterol to manufacture our hormones.  

Quoting Anonymous:

Vegetable fat??

I'm confused.

I only use extra Virginia olive oil when cooking and real butter, and not too much. I also limit my dairy because it can be fattening. So what polyunsaturated fats are you meaning??


Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Probably because of the saturated fat vs vegetable fat.  Polyunsaturated fats cause inflammation and fats like butter and lard are actually better for you.

Quoting Anonymous:

 Thanks for responding!  I appreciate it.


I'm vegetarian, so these numbers confuse me even further.  I do eat oatmeal about 4 times a week.  Steel cut from the organic food store with 100% pure maple syrup.


We don't eat meat.  Once a week, we eat fish.


I also take a daily women's multi-vitamin.


So honestly, I was really perplexed when I got my numbers back.


Back when I was a meat eater ( a few years ago I had this same test), and my levels were actually better.  Weird!


 EDIt:  also, I'm 5'3' and 127 pounds. 


Quoting itsm3:


while your LDL levels fall in the normal range, it's at the higher end of spectrum (average is about 200 and anything above will put you at high risk for coronary diseases/high cholesterol etc) that's why your doc said you were borderline.  also, your HDL levels are really low which also puts you at risk (a good range is to fall close to 60mg/dL.  the balance of the two is what determines how "healthy" your heart/arteries are and you have a pretty high LDL and very low LDL therefore you are borderline.  if your LDL were any higher, you would be considered "at risk".


lower your cholesterol through a healthy diet -- eat oatmeal at least once a day, followed by lots of fresh fruits, veggies, lean meats (avoid red  meat), plenty of water and whole grains.  healthy fats are good for you too - they are great for raising your HDL levels as are eggs ( eat the whites only).  incorporate exercise and accelerate this process. 


vitamin D have been proven to protect the body against disease so take vitamin D supplement or drops on a regular basis. 










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