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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

HELP!!!!!!!

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 23 Replies

My two year old is showing signs of being ready to potty train, I have taken him to the store to let him pick out underwear. He is doing ok, but it seems he needs a better incentive to go or he will just go in his pants and still play.

What has worked well for you and your child? Stickers, toys, snacks...? I have a set of happy face stickers, but he is tired of them lol. I cheer for him when he goes and do not scold him when he has an accident. I know it will take time but I want to make it fun for him. Advice??

Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:08 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:11 PM

bump

Armywifeholcomb
by Silver Member on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:13 PM
Bump
I'm in the same boat...
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
robyann
by on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:14 PM
1 mom liked this

get some very cheap little toys and a little bit of candy, give him something everytime he goes in the potty, give him 2 if he goes poop in the potty. If he's standing up to pee already, put some cheerios in the toliet and let him try to hit them or sink them lol. Boys love that! lol

Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:14 PM
1 mom liked this

Potty Training Rewards


Whether you're dealing with a potty training newbie or a seasoned potty resister, one of the best ways to get your kid on the pot is with a potty reward system. Here are some ideas for positive potty reinforcement: 

  • 1. Sticker chart. No toddler can resist racking up stickers. Charts can be as simple as tacking a piece of paper to the wall. Every time your toddler goes, bam! A sticker goes on the chart. Try printing your own personalized reward stickers at Huggies.com or print out potty charts with your child's favorite Nick characters on Nick Jr.

  • 2. Candy. Kids will do almost anything for candy. Just choose tiny sweet treats, like jelly beans or M&Ms, so you don't have to worry about sugar overload. 

  • 3. Stamps. Toddlers love stamps almost as much as they love stickers! Buy a stamp and an inkpad and stamp your kid's hand whenever he goes. (Or use a chart if you want to save on hand soap!) 

  • 4. Magnets. If you've got room on your fridge (or if you want to buy a separate magnetic board), you can give your kid a new magnet every time he goes. Try cool Nick Jr. paper doll magnets. Or add a learning bonus with alphabet or number magnets: Learn your ABCs and 123s while you go pee! 

  • 5. Tickets. Buy (or make) simple carnival-style tickets to hand out every time your kid does the deed. Toddlers will love just getting the actual ticket. Older potty trainers (3- and 4-year-olds) can redeem tickets for a bigger reward—say, 10 tickets for new coloring book, 20 tickets for a new monster truck, etc. 

  • 6. Printables. Kids love printable coloring pages and giving one as a reward is an inexpensive, fun way to encourage potty training. Find your child's favorite characters on Nick Jr.'s Printable Finder.

  • 7. Activities. Let your kid earn special activities with you in exchange for going potty. This can be a supplement to a simpler reward system. Say, for every 10 stickers, your kid gets to pick out a book at the library or after 20 stickers, you head to the ice-cream store.

  • 8. Legos. For older kids, get a Lego set (or something with multiple pieces) and let them earn (and then add!) a new piece or two to whatever princess castle/pirate hideout he's currently building each time he uses the potty.

  • 9. Potty Training Rewards Calendar. These cute calendars let your kids push a button, hear a message and get a piece of chocolate each time they use the potty.

  • 10. Get a piggy bank and let your child put a nickle into a "potty bank"every time she goes pee. If she goes poop, give her a quarter. By the time she's potty trained, she'll have enough to buy that Yo Gabba Gabba doll she's been begging for.
You can pick and choose from the list above, or make up your own child's reward system. YOU know your child best, so you know what'll best motivate her to go-go-go, and keep it going!
Wonderwoman1432
by on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:15 PM

http://www.janetlansbury.com/2010/03/in-the-toilet/


PinkButterfly66
by Ruby Member on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:16 PM

Find his currency.  That one thing that he will move heaven and earth for.  For my daughter it was plastic easter eggs.  She got so excited about getting a plastic egg every time she went to the potty, she was super motivated and was completely out of pull ups in 2 weeks.

rebeccab1966
by Gold Member on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:16 PM

I kept a clear jar of M&M's and used them as an incentive since my kids LOVED M&M's.  Seems like my daughter was a little easier than my son.  

ragdoll13
by on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:17 PM

We give my 2yo ONE chocolate covered raisin if she asks and goes to the potty on her own.   If we make her potty (like before bed), she doesn't get one.  Only the times that she initiates the potty-ing.   We don't ever give her sweets, or juice or anything remotely candy related so a chocolate covered raisin a is a pretty big deal for her.   She loves them.  So far, it's been working quite well!

GaleJ
by Gold Member on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:36 PM

I simply do not understand this at all. Why does anyone think it a good idea to try and bribe a child to become toilet trained. Toileting is a basic biological function that requires a certain level of both physical and mental readiness and will be accomplished in due time with patience. There is no hurry and the idea that bribing one to do a biological function is necessary, let alone wise, is beyond my comprehension. Bribery isn't the best approach to anything but is particularly unsuited to toileting and teaches the wrong lesson and can lead to some difficulties with some children in some situations. Biological function is not something that should be thought of as having any other benefits than simply doing what is necessary to take care of our bodies and should be done for intrinsic reasons not for a sticker, candy or toy. 

Let your child see others using the toilet, explain that this is how children and adults eliminate once they are no longer infants. Explain that they should be able to feel the need to either urinate or defecate and that when they do they should go to the toilet to do so and if they are ready it will happen quite literally overnight. The age range for this duel readiness is rather broad and until both are reached the toileting will be rather hit or miss with accidents happening more the less ready they are. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 20, 2013 at 3:44 PM

OOOOOOOOkkkk. O.o

I just ran to the store and bought him some cool batman stickers and a potty book.  I like for things to be fun around here :)  In ten years it's not going to matter if I bribed him or if I did it all boring like...he will use the toilet just the same.  Relax and enjoy life a little.  Peace.


Quoting GaleJ:

I simply do not understand this at all. Why does anyone think it a good idea to try and bribe a child to become toilet trained. Toileting is a basic biological function that requires a certain level of both physical and mental readiness and will be accomplished in due time with patience. There is no hurry and the idea that bribing one to do a biological function is necessary, let alone wise, is beyond my comprehension. Bribery isn't the best approach to anything but is particularly unsuited to toileting and teaches the wrong lesson and can lead to some difficulties with some children in some situations. Biological function is not something that should be thought of as having any other benefits than simply doing what is necessary to take care of our bodies and should be done for intrinsic reasons not for a sticker, candy or toy. 

Let your child see others using the toilet, explain that this is how children and adults eliminate once they are no longer infants. Explain that they should be able to feel the need to either urinate or defecate and that when they do they should go to the toilet to do so and if they are ready it will happen quite literally overnight. The age range for this duel readiness is rather broad and until both are reached the toileting will be rather hit or miss with accidents happening more the less ready they are. 



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