Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Dog attack study from 2010

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 139 Replies
11 moms liked this
A study performed by the American Veterinary Medical Association, the CDC, and the Humane Society of the United States, analyzed dog bite statistics from the last 20 years and found that the statistics don’t show that any breeds are inherently more dangerous than others.

***The study showed that the most popular large breed dogs at any one time were consistently on the list of breeds that bit fatally.

**There were a high number of fatal bites from Doberman pinschers in the 1970s, for example, because Dobermans were very popular at that time and there were more Dobermans around, and because Dobermans’ size makes their bites more dangerous.

***The number of fatal bites from pit bulls rose in the 1980s for the same reason, and the number of bites from Rottweilers in the 1990s.

***The study also noted that there are no reliable statistics for nonfatal dog bites, so there is no way to know how often smaller breeds are biting.



LISTEN UP PEOPLE BECAUSE THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART:

In other words, ”Biting has more to do with circumstances, behavior, training (or lack thereof), and ignorance on the part of human beings.”
Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:12 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Uhura
by Gold Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:14 AM
1 mom liked this

The actual highest biting breed of dog is the chihuahua, purely because people think "oh, it's a little dog, it doesn't need to be trained." >.>

But otherwise, yes, I totally agree with what you're saying. It's not the breed, it's the humans who own them.


CafeMom Tickers CafeMom Tickers 

CafeMom Tickers


O-Gia-Baby
by Bronze Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:15 AM
7 moms liked this
Fuck dogs period they bite and kill

LONG LIVE THE CATS
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
anonymous12308
by Platinum Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:15 AM
Agreed
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
2metalbabies
by Gold Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:17 AM
My pit just farted and it stinks!
Sorry I'm drunk and need to share, lmfao!
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Fields456
by Ruby Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:17 AM
I wonder if this study took into account how the owners raised their dogs and their attitudes towards them. Hmmm
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Redwoods_Mama
by Platinum Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:18 AM
2 moms liked this

Well yeah.  Popularity ruins a breed,

That's why there are now shelties that are scared of their own shadow, chihuahuas who are yappy little housepissers, cocker spaniels who will eat a child's face just for funsies, labs who go from happy and relaxed to aggressive and dangerous at the flip of a switch.  GSDs who walk with a whipped butt and are high energy to the point of insanity, "spaniel/st bernard rage", and yorkies who are untrainable assholes.

I dread the day my breed is ruined beyond repair.  :( 

Before someone freaks out at me that their spaniel/whatever is awesome, yeah.  Because there are still great breeders out there.  They're just overwhelmed by the wannabes who put two dogs that look alike together and don't know shit about training or behavior, let alone sgenetics and family lines.

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:18 AM
In other words, ”Biting has more to do with circumstances, behavior, training (or lack thereof), and ignorance on the part of human beings.”


Quoting Fields456:

I wonder if this study took into account how the owners raised their dogs and their attitudes towards them. Hmmm

Val99
by Ruby Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:19 AM
5 moms liked this

My son is a veterinarian and I have spoken to him regarding this topic.  He says some pit bulls are sweet and loving, but many are unpredictable and can kill quickly with a jaw more powerful than almost all other breeds.  

He says that he would never have one near his children, and he would not take his children to a home where a pit bull lived.  He is responsible for his children's safety first and foremost.

I am not looking for a debate, or pit bull owners to burn me alive with vitriol.  I am just sharing what one vet has to say about the situation.  I will not reply to any "debate-type" posts.


Youngmother456
by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:23 AM
1 mom liked this
I agree but we cannot forget that genetics DOES play a role. Now before you have a fit I AM NOT saying that puts have "bad genes".

Behavior, a tendency to bite or being bite inhibited are all traits that can be passed on. When breeds become popular you have many back yard breeders who do not have a clue. Then owners (good and bad) get a dog that has "bad genes".
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 27, 2013 at 2:25 AM
1 mom liked this


My vet said the same thing.  He has Pitt Bulls and volunteers for a Pitt rescue organization.  When we were looking for a family dog, I asked him about the dogs he works with.  He said he would never recommend a Pitt for a household with small children.  He doesn't have any children.

Quoting Val99:

My son is a veterinarian and I have spoken to him regarding this topic.  He says some pit bulls are sweet and loving, but many are unpredictable and can kill quickly with a jaw more powerful than almost all other breeds.  

He says that he would never have one near his children, and he would not take his children to a home where a pit bull lived.  He is responsible for his children's safety first and foremost.

I am not looking for a debate, or pit bull owners to burn me alive with vitriol.  I am just sharing what one vet has to say about the situation.  I will not reply to any "debate-type" posts.




Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)