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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

I have no clue how to feed my baby.

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
What and how much should a one year old be eating? Is it pretty much anything? This is my first so I'm probably over thinking it but I just don't want to mess up.
Posted by Anonymous on Mar. 7, 2013 at 2:35 AM
Replies (41-50):
paganmommy4
by on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:09 AM


Those foods should be avoided UNTIL a year old. By a year old they should have teeth. My kiddo had teeth and she got smaller portions of what I made for dinner and easy to eat.. 

Quoting KennyPooPoo22:

I have an orange "allergy" it isn't life threatening at all, just breaks my mouth out. I also can eat tomatoes, any citrus fruit, mango, or pineapple. Never heard of them killing anybody though

Quoting crumpy_gat:

Um yeah.  Talk to anyone who has allergies or a child with allergies.  Ignorance is a dangerous thing.  Oranges is new to me though, is that an allergy risk now? 

Quoting stickyfingers:

Yes there is. Lol

Quoting lendales_mommi:

There is no evidence to prove any of this nonsense you just listed.....



Quoting stickyfingers:

They shouldn't have peanut butter, strawberries and other things that are common for allergies. I think even oranges. It's not just a free for all when they turn one. Some things are dangerous too like nuts and popcorn



Quoting Anonymous:

At a yr old why can't they eat anything?





Quoting stickyfingers:

No they can't eat anything if they have teeth don't listen to pp! Give her mashed fruit like bananas. I would give mine rice crispies all soggy lol if you give meat make sure it's teeny pieces but she should have mostly fruits and veggies right now. And milk. Are you still nursing or giving formula?









Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:10 AM
Oh.lol


Quoting lendales_mommi:

I dont know how lol



Quoting Anonymous:

Can you make it clicky? I'm mobile





Quoting lendales_mommi:

OP check out that link i posted it has lots of good info. I know every momma thinks they know everything LOL BUT the doctors dont even know what they are talking about. They have been lieing to us for years on what are children can eat...at age one the only thing i was worried about was choking as allergies are not an issue in our family......im sure if ur child had one you would know by now. That's why i always followed my heart with what to give my child. You live and ya learn :)







crumpy_gat
by No. on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:12 AM

Lol no, but is it recommended not to give it to babies now?  I've been wondering what age to introduce it to ds

Quoting KennyPooPoo22:

I have an orange "allergy" it isn't life threatening at all, just breaks my mouth out. I also can't eat tomatoes, any citrus fruit, mango, or pineapple. Never heard of them killing anybody though

Quoting crumpy_gat:

Um yeah.  Talk to anyone who has allergies or a child with allergies.  Ignorance is a dangerous thing.  Oranges is new to me though, is that an allergy risk now? 

Quoting stickyfingers:

Yes there is. Lol

Quoting lendales_mommi:

There is no evidence to prove any of this nonsense you just listed.....



Quoting stickyfingers:

They shouldn't have peanut butter, strawberries and other things that are common for allergies. I think even oranges. It's not just a free for all when they turn one. Some things are dangerous too like nuts and popcorn



Quoting Anonymous:

At a yr old why can't they eat anything?





Quoting stickyfingers:

No they can't eat anything if they have teeth don't listen to pp! Give her mashed fruit like bananas. I would give mine rice crispies all soggy lol if you give meat make sure it's teeny pieces but she should have mostly fruits and veggies right now. And milk. Are you still nursing or giving formula?








paganmommy4
by on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:12 AM

http://kidshealth.org/parent/pregnancy_newborn/breastfeed/feed12yr.html

http://www.babycenter.com/302_1-year-old_3658053.bc

Pretty much, but they should be wholesome foods in appropriately-sized portions.


By one year of age, a child's digestive system is normally mature enough to for him or her to eat the same foods as the rest of the family. You should make sure the child is getting enough water and fiber--which is found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains--because this will help prevent lower GI problems. Breast milk is still a great food, and may be continued along with complementary foods. If the child has been receiving formula, it is considered safe to substitute whole milk after 1 year of age (and then low-fat milk after 2 years). Note that children who drink too much cow's milk to the exclusion of solid foods can develop iron deficiency, as the milk is iron-poor and displaces foods that would provide iron. 

 

It is important to realize that small children need much smaller portions than adults, and that you should not force a child to eat more than he wants. Children have a built-in ability to eat enough but not too much, so you should offer small portions of healthful foods and allow the child to decide how much to eat (or even whether to eat at all). Insisting a child eat more can override this innate ability, and could possibly promote overweight later in life. 

 

Also, a 1-year-old child is learning eating habits that will be difficult to change later, so caregivers should offer healthful food choices--whole grains, vegetables, beans, and fruits--and limit the amount of junk foods the child consumes.  

Sources: Understanding Nutrition, 11th ed. by Ellie Whitney & Sharon Rolfes, Cengage-Wadsworth, 2008.
CV3
by Silver Member on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:12 AM
1 mom liked this
I heard that waiting to intriduce common allergy foods actually increases the chances of the child being allergic to them. I made a point to give my son peanut butter at six months. He hasnt had honey but only becausr I only use it to sweeten my tea. He had strawberrys and oranges at six months too. He had tomatoes at seven months and it flared his eczema so he hasnt had that since but thats it.


Quoting jjchick75:

We never started solids before 9 months and did baby led solids. I don't give honey(or nuts) either. We have several food allergies in our family so food and what is safe and what isn't is a large part of my life lol. I just meant after a year if parents feel comfortable with it, it's seen as safe to give honey. 



Quoting horseap:

 *sigh* I explained to a pp why I put it that I didnt realize what group this was, that we kept dd with a virgin gut until 7 months and she has allergies so we held off. Plus she just said 1 not 12 month 1, 18 months 1 or 1 going on 2. I always go better safe than sorry.


Quoting jjchick75:


Honey is fine at a year old also.


http://wholesomebabyfood.momtastic.com/infantbotulismhoney.htm#.UThGqhzryjQ




Quoting horseap:


 Um no honey first of all.  But are you talking snacks or meals?






 





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paganmommy4
by on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:13 AM

I suggest you google what to feed your kid just for the fact that everyone is a flipping expert in here.. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:14 AM
Regalia!


Quoting paganmommy4:

http://kidshealth.org/parent/pregnancy_newborn/breastfeed/feed12yr.html

http://www.babycenter.com/302_1-year-old_3658053.bc

Pretty much, but they should be wholesome foods in appropriately-sized portions.


By one year of age, a child's digestive system is normally mature enough to for him or her to eat the same foods as the rest of the family. You should make sure the child is getting enough water and fiber--which is found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains--because this will help prevent lower GI problems. Breast milk is still a great food, and may be continued along with complementary foods. If the child has been receiving formula, it is considered safe to substitute whole milk after 1 year of age (and then low-fat milk after 2 years). Note that children who drink too much cow's milk to the exclusion of solid foods can develop iron deficiency, as the milk is iron-poor and displaces foods that would provide iron. 

 

It is important to realize that small children need much smaller portions than adults, and that you should not force a child to eat more than he wants. Children have a built-in ability to eat enough but not too much, so you should offer small portions of healthful foods and allow the child to decide how much to eat (or even whether to eat at all). Insisting a child eat more can override this innate ability, and could possibly promote overweight later in life. 

 

Also, a 1-year-old child is learning eating habits that will be difficult to change later, so caregivers should offer healthful food choices--whole grains, vegetables, beans, and fruits--and limit the amount of junk foods the child consumes.  

Sources: Understanding Nutrition, 11th ed. by Ellie Whitney & Sharon Rolfes, Cengage-Wadsworth, 2008.

lendales_mommi
by on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:14 AM

http://www.babycenter.com/0_baby-food-revolution-new-rules-for-feeding-your-baby_10320504.bc


can someone make this a clicky please..its a link to the article about there being no evidence that what food you give has anything to do with allergies after 4-6 months

raye-chan
by Raye on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:16 AM
Here is a bump since I'm in a similar spot now. The inky thing I do is share my food with my little guy but I watch it since we do have a few intolerance issues that run in the family.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Mar. 7, 2013 at 3:16 AM
Regalia? Ha. I meant thanks!


Quoting paganmommy4:

http://kidshealth.org/parent/pregnancy_newborn/breastfeed/feed12yr.html

http://www.babycenter.com/302_1-year-old_3658053.bc

Pretty much, but they should be wholesome foods in appropriately-sized portions.


By one year of age, a child's digestive system is normally mature enough to for him or her to eat the same foods as the rest of the family. You should make sure the child is getting enough water and fiber--which is found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains--because this will help prevent lower GI problems. Breast milk is still a great food, and may be continued along with complementary foods. If the child has been receiving formula, it is considered safe to substitute whole milk after 1 year of age (and then low-fat milk after 2 years). Note that children who drink too much cow's milk to the exclusion of solid foods can develop iron deficiency, as the milk is iron-poor and displaces foods that would provide iron. 

 

It is important to realize that small children need much smaller portions than adults, and that you should not force a child to eat more than he wants. Children have a built-in ability to eat enough but not too much, so you should offer small portions of healthful foods and allow the child to decide how much to eat (or even whether to eat at all). Insisting a child eat more can override this innate ability, and could possibly promote overweight later in life. 

 

Also, a 1-year-old child is learning eating habits that will be difficult to change later, so caregivers should offer healthful food choices--whole grains, vegetables, beans, and fruits--and limit the amount of junk foods the child consumes.  

Sources: Understanding Nutrition, 11th ed. by Ellie Whitney & Sharon Rolfes, Cengage-Wadsworth, 2008.

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