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Gifted Child?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 12 Replies
My child will be 2 in a couple weeks. While all children are different, and special in their own way, I believe my child is gifted. Since I'm sure almost every parent thinks his/her child is above average, what kind of signs would make you agree?

I won't list the things my child does, as I know the CM moms will just say things like, "That's not gifted, my son did that at 6 months", etc.

I'm not obsessing over Kiddo's intelligence level or anything, but call me curious.
Posted by Anonymous on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:05 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:09 PM
Bump!
illinoismommy83
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:12 PM

If your child can read and write at 23 months, they are gifted. If your kid can make a sentence and pee in the potty your kid is normal.

However, if you have money then your child is surely gifted and there is some scam of a preschool for gifted toddlers who'd love to have your money.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:13 PM
Interesting reply. Thanks.


Quoting illinoismommy83:

If your child can read and write at 23 months, they are gifted. If your kid can make a sentence and pee in the potty your kid is normal.

However, if you have money then your child is surely gifted and there is some scam of a preschool for gifted toddlers who'd love to have your money.


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:16 PM
Bump.
christina0607
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:16 PM

Gifetd at 2? I guess if he's reading and beginning writing. If they are articulating full sentences, with a vocabulary that rivals lets say a 6yo. Understanding simple math and maybe working towards higher math.

I would think the child would need to be extremely advanced in order to be considered gifted at such a young age. 

My brother was reading before age 3, but he wasn't gifted...he just read early. 

There would need to be a lot more than that I guess. 

TranquilMind
by Ruby Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:21 PM

I've got a couple of them, and interestingly, they are the following two types of kids that the article I mention discusses: one that spoke extremely early (6 months) and had an enormous vocabulary, and astonishing memory, remembering every word of entire large books from the second or third reading.  Another that waited to speak, but his first sentence was a complex one for a beginner. (The article below uses the sentence, "Charlie, could you please pass the salt." which I thought was funny since mine said -without ever having talked before, really - " May I have some green beans, please?"   That second one also lined up everything in complex patterns,like toys and magnets, could answer math questions when still crawling, and could give me detailed directions to our destination at  age 4 or so.   

These following are typical signs, but not the only signs:  (article is large, but snippet below):

The clearest sign of accelerated development is in the area of language. Gifted children tend to

speak earlier, use more complex sentence structure, develop a larger vocabulary, show an early

interest in books and written works, and express themselves better than other children. In my study,

one child said his first word, “hi,” at 4 months of age. One-eighth of the group spoke before their

tenth month. Most parents indicated early and extensive vocabulary development. One mother said

that her daughter wanted to be read to constantly from the time she “sat up.” Another describes a

child who sat for two to three hours listening to books at the age of eighteen months.

There is also the case of the silent gifted child. In this child, language development is atypical. He

is unusually quiet after the babbling stage, but manages to communicate all of his needs.

nonverbally. He appears to understand everything and will follow lengthy sets of directions,

indicating high receptive ability. (If this does not occur, it is necessary to have the child's hearing

checked.) The moment of truth arrives when the child decides to speak and comes out with a full

sentence - often a complex one - as his first utterance (e.g., “Charlie, would you please pass the

salt?”). Some gifted children have been known not to speak until the age of four. One such case

was Einstein. But these late speakers most often begin oral communication with fully formed

sentences. Children who tend not to speak at all until they have full sentences may also rehearse

other activities in their heads until they have perfected the processes. Instead of creeping and

crawling and taking a fist step, they may break into a run one day with no warning.

Gifted children usually have extraordinary memories. In my study, excellent memory was the most

prevalent sign of giftedness reported. Parkinson (1990) reported that all of the gifted children she

studied had excellent memories. They may be able to repeat songs or television commercials well

before two years of age. They can frequently “read” a story which has been read to them several

times because they remember the words on each page. I once saw an 18-month-old do this with a

60-page beginning reader. She was able to recognize several written words at 11 months. Almost

half of the children in my study could recognize letters of the alphabet before they were two.

Avid interest in reading prior to school age is one of the signs of giftedness

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:24 PM
Great reply. Thanks!


Quoting TranquilMind:

I've got a couple of them, and interestingly, they are the following two types of kids that the article I mention discusses: one that spoke extremely early (6 months) and had an enormous vocabulary, and astonishing memory, remembering every word of entire large books from the second or third reading.  Another that waited to speak, but his first sentence was a complex one for a beginner. (The article below uses the sentence, "Charlie, could you please pass the salt." which I thought was funny since mine said -without ever having talked before, really - " May I have some green beans, please?"   That second one also lined up everything in complex patterns,like toys and magnets, could answer math questions when still crawling, and could give me detailed directions to our destination at  age 4 or so.   


These following are typical signs, but not the only signs:  (article is large, but snippet below):



The clearest sign of accelerated development is in the area of language. Gifted children tend to


speak earlier, use more complex sentence structure, develop a larger vocabulary, show an early


interest in books and written works, and express themselves better than other children. In my study,


one child said his first word, “hi,” at 4 months of age. One-eighth of the group spoke before their


tenth month. Most parents indicated early and extensive vocabulary development. One mother said


that her daughter wanted to be read to constantly from the time she “sat up.” Another describes a


child who sat for two to three hours listening to books at the age of eighteen months.


There is also the case of the silent gifted child. In this child, language development is atypical. He


is unusually quiet after the babbling stage, but manages to communicate all of his needs.


nonverbally. He appears to understand everything and will follow lengthy sets of directions,


indicating high receptive ability. (If this does not occur, it is necessary to have the child's hearing


checked.) The moment of truth arrives when the child decides to speak and comes out with a full


sentence - often a complex one - as his first utterance (e.g., “Charlie, would you please pass the


salt?”). Some gifted children have been known not to speak until the age of four. One such case


was Einstein. But these late speakers most often begin oral communication with fully formed


sentences. Children who tend not to speak at all until they have full sentences may also rehearse


other activities in their heads until they have perfected the processes. Instead of creeping and


crawling and taking a fist step, they may break into a run one day with no warning.


Gifted children usually have extraordinary memories. In my study, excellent memory was the most


prevalent sign of giftedness reported. Parkinson (1990) reported that all of the gifted children she


studied had excellent memories. They may be able to repeat songs or television commercials well


before two years of age. They can frequently “read” a story which has been read to them several


times because they remember the words on each page. I once saw an 18-month-old do this with a


60-page beginning reader. She was able to recognize several written words at 11 months. Almost


half of the children in my study could recognize letters of the alphabet before they were two.


Avid interest in reading prior to school age is one of the signs of giftedness


TranquilMind
by Ruby Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:24 PM

 It is true that it is only confirmed later on.  But the early signs are there, and you will see that your kid is capable of more than most other children early on, and that it stays consistent, not dropping off in early childhood.


Quoting christina0607:

Gifetd at 2? I guess if he's reading and beginning writing. If they are articulating full sentences, with a vocabulary that rivals lets say a 6yo. Understanding simple math and maybe working towards higher math.

I would think the child would need to be extremely advanced in order to be considered gifted at such a young age. 

My brother was reading before age 3, but he wasn't gifted...he just read early. 

There would need to be a lot more than that I guess. 


 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:26 PM

I have a 2 year old who I consider smarter than the average but not gifted.

faire_jour
by Ruby Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 2:27 PM

We got my child an IQ test (for a different reason, I swear!). Her IQ is above average, but who cares? She is who she is. (BTW, I am "gifted", whatever that means. I was in all the programs in school, and all it did was make me feel like I didn't have to work hard because I was smart.)

Oh, and I was a totally normal two year old, there were no signs of my "future greatness" :p

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