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anyone ever had sun poisoning???

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 29 Replies
What are the symptoms?? I got a horrible sun burn yesterday, worst ever. I had chills like crazy yesterday. Not so much now, but my eyes hurt, like when you have a fever. My skin is very red and swollen. I have been in bed all day bc it hurts to bad to move. I got up earlier today to attempt to get something to eat, but I got right back in bed bc I felt weak and nauseated. I just feel like crap, but I don't have any blisters. Im just freaking out bc I've never been this burnt and feeling so crappy. I just wanna see if anyone else felt like this???
Posted by Anonymous on Mar. 9, 2013 at 9:55 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MrsDavidB25
by Stacey on Mar. 9, 2013 at 9:56 PM

 That sounds awful. Where were you yesterday that you were out in the sun that much?

FL2AK
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 9:56 PM
1 mom liked this
My mom gets it and that is exactly how she feels.
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TexanMomOf6
by Platinum Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 9:58 PM
1 mom liked this

Maybe you are dehydrated?

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:01 PM
It is awful :( I will now think twice before going out with sunscreen. Ugh. And I was at the beach.

Quoting MrsDavidB25:

 That sounds awful. Where were you yesterday that you were out in the sun that much?

Bluescorpia
by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:02 PM
Yes I do .... this is why I can't hang out in the sun.
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:03 PM
That's what I was thinking. I went online to look up info on it and it mentioned dehydration. I never knew you could get dehydrated from sun burn.

Quoting TexanMomOf6:

Maybe you are dehydrated?

Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:03 PM

Skin Problems & Treatments Health Center

Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning doesn't really mean you've been poisoned. It is often the term used for a severe case of sunburn. This is usually a burn from ultraviolet (UV) radiation that inflames your skin.

Symptoms of Sun Poisoning

 Within just 15 minutes of being in the sun, you can be sunburned. But you might not know it right away. The redness and discomfort might not show up a few hours.

You can become severely sunburned if you stay in the sun a long time and don't wear protection. You are more likely to sunburn if you have light skin and fair hair.

Severe sunburn or sun poisoning can cause symptoms such as the following:

  • Skin redness and blistering
  • Pain and tingling
  • Swelling
  • Headache
  • Fever and chills
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • Dehydration

     

Treating Sun Poisoning

 For severe sunburn, these simple remedies usually do the trick:

  • Get out of the sun.
  • Take a cool (not cold) shower or bath or apply cool compresses.
  • Drink extra fluids for a few days.
  • Take ibuprofen or acetaminophen to relieve pain.
  • Use aloe gel or a moisturizer.
  • Completely cover sunburned areas when going outside.

Seek immediate medical care for these symptoms:

  • A sunburn that forms blisters, covers a large area, or is very painful
  • Facial swelling
  • Fever and chills
  • Upset stomach
  • Headache, confusion, or faintness
  • Signs of dehydration

 

Preventing Sun Poisoning

Follow the basics of sun safety:

  • Wear a sunscreen that has an SPF of at least 30 and says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means that it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Put it on all over about 15 to 30 minutes before going out in the sun. Reapply about every two hours and after you've been in the water.
  • Limit your sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and remember that water, snow, and sand can intensify the sun's damaging rays.
  • Wear sunglasses, a hat, and protective clothing.

Check on your medications. Ask your doctor if anything you take might make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. For example, some acne medications, antibiotics, antidepressants, diuretics, heart drugs, and birth control pills make skin more sensitive. So can some antibacterial medications and fragrances that go on your skin.

 

Other Types of Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning may also refer to two types of reactions to sunlight:

Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE). PMLE is a reaction that does not appear to be linked to drugs or diseases. It happens in people who are at risk and who are exposed to intense sunlight that they're not used to. For example, people living in northern climates could experience this if taking a winter vacation in a tropical climate.

Symptoms are a severe skin rash, usually appearing several hours after going out in the sun. The rash may be itchy and include:

  • Small bumps over the sun-exposed areas of the body
  • Dense clumps of bumps
  • Hives, usually on the arms, lower legs, and chest
  • Sun Poisoning

    (continued)

    Other Types of Sun Poisoning continued...

    An inherited form of PMLE occurs in Native Americans. It can last from spring until fall. Symptoms at first include redness, burning, and itching, which usually last two or three days but can persist for weeks. Other symptoms may begin within a few hours of sun exposure but go away in a few hours. They include:

    • Fatigue
    • Chills
    • Headache
    • Nausea

    Treatment for PMLE depends on its severity. Other than staying out of the sun and protecting yourself when you are in the sun, you may not need treatment. The rash can clear by itself within seven to 10 days.

    Solar urticaria. Symptoms may develop within minutes of exposure to sun. If large areas of skin are involved, symptoms may include:

    • Itchiness
    • Redness
    • Raised areas on the skin (wheals) or blisters
    • Wheezing
    • Dizziness
    • Loss of consciousness

    Although the blisters usually go away within hours, you may experience the reaction off and on throughout the years. Antihistamines can treat some cases, but see your doctor for advice.

    Other treatment or prevention for PMLE or solar urticaria may include:

    • Steroids that go on your skin
    • Sunscreen that says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB radiation
    • Phototherapy with psoralen UV light (PUVA) to desensitize skin to UV light

     http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/sun-poisoning

                             Betty Boop Lets go to the disco.    Betty Jean Newell Smith

ktwister
by Gold Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:03 PM

That's how I felt, I couldn't keep anything down as well.   Keep hydrated and you can take advil for the pain.  Even if it's just small amounts of liquids at a time. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:04 PM
Ugh that sucks :(

Quoting Bluescorpia:

Yes I do .... this is why I can't hang out in the sun.
Aamy
by Ruby Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:04 PM

Yup thats how i felt. Drink LOTS and LOTS of water. 

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