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Disability Rant... May offend...

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 23 Replies

Okay so someone please explain to me why this situation is justifiable. My BFF is a self-employed contractor and has one client. This client is in her 20's and has down syndrome. She is basically functioning at the level of an elementary school-aged child. The client is able to take care of her own personal grooming, eating etc. She doesn't have any violent outbreaks or anything like that.

This client receives full medical care, is given a large amount of money for living expenses (all paid out to her adoptive parents), and money for entertainment etc. In addition, my BFF makes about $30k a year (prior to taxes) to take this individual out into the community for socialization.

This is what I don't understand...

Why is it that this person's daycare is fully paid for by the government for ONE to ONE care? Children who get daycare assistance certainly aren't given one to one nannies. Before my BFF was assigned to this client the client was doing just fine in a group daycare kind of situation...

So if anyone can explain to me why my BFF is making as much money as many teachers to take care of one person during the day I would love to hear it. I have told my BFF I think the allocation of government funds in this situation is disproportionate to the actual need of this individual. She explained that the position of the government is that it allows her (the caretaker) to give her undivided attention to the client.

My confession is that I think that money could be better spent. For what the government is paying her, they could pay a provider to watch multiple kids or a center employee to watch multiple adults. This client also is given money from the government to pay for her trips to the movies, dinners/lunches out, field trips etc.

Am I wrong in thinking that this is a huge chunk of change to spend on one person's socialization/daytime care?

Posted by Anonymous on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:29 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:34 PM

Oh and I do realize that on a personal level this does not affect me at all, but as a tax-payer it bothers me...

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:37 PM
2 moms liked this
You don't know the full details of this individual and what other needs she may have that your BFF doesn't tell you about, at least I hope she doesn't do full discussions because she'd be violating HIPAA.
nbgg8687
by Bronze Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:38 PM
Hmm... I didn't know much of this. I workednot as an aid and the people I worked with were severely disabled. if they got any kind.of socialization, it was out of pocket of the families. the group home was covered only to a certain amount through insurance. for.insurance to pay for in home care it has to be pretty bad and its not easy to get. that's here anyways... so this surprises me. Not saying u are lying... I guess that the parents can't always be held accountable for the child's needs, including socializing funds. so maybe they have funds like that for them. if that makes sense?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:42 PM

Quoting Anonymous:

You don't know the full details of this individual and what other needs she may have that your BFF doesn't tell you about, at least I hope she doesn't do full discussions because she'd be violating HIPAA.

She hasn't violated HIPPA, but I hear stories about the things they do together and the client is basically operating at a nine-year-old child's capability... I guess from everything I know about the situation the person qualifies strictly for having Down's... I am personally not affected by this, but I don't understand the rationale. Apparently it is a pretty common scenario where we live.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:42 PM
I make about that being a personal care giver. I don't know what it's like where you live, but I'm on the low end of the pay scale for my job.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:43 PM
Well if shes an adult shes kinda outgrown a day care type setting, u cant compare adult care to childcare as special needs under age children have their parents to take care of them and their needs, however adults with special needs dont always have the luxury. As long as ur bff is actually taking care of her client I think its awesome.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:43 PM



Quoting Anonymous:

I make about that being a personal care giver. I don't know what it's like where you live, but I'm on the low end of the pay scale for my job.


Do you have just one client? Does that person truley need one-on-one care if you do?


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:45 PM



Quoting Anonymous:

Well if shes an adult shes kinda outgrown a day care type setting, u cant compare adult care to childcare as special needs under age children have their parents to take care of them and their needs, however adults with special needs dont always have the luxury. As long as ur bff is actually taking care of her client I think its awesome.


I think what she does is awesome too! I just wonder if the funds couldn't be better allocated to multiple people. This client does still live at home with her parents, but they call it a rental situation and the govt pays a big chunk of money for "rent".

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:53 PM
No, I have more than one, but I go to some people home for 8 hours at a time sometimes. Sometimes people just need an hour. I don't have a huge amount, but I have more than one.

Quoting Anonymous:




Quoting Anonymous:

I make about that being a personal care giver. I don't know what it's like where you live, but I'm on the low end of the pay scale for my job.




Do you have just one client? Does that person truley need one-on-one care if you do?


Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:54 PM
If you know that much about her, she has violated HIPAA and I have nothing more to say but, ugh!

Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

You don't know the full details of this individual and what other needs she may have that your BFF doesn't tell you about, at least I hope she doesn't do full discussions because she'd be violating HIPAA.



She hasn't violated HIPPA, but I hear stories about the things they do together and the client is basically operating at a nine-year-old child's capability...

I guess from everything I know about the situation the person qualifies strictly for having Down's...

I am personally not affected by this, but I don't understand the rationale. Apparently it is a pretty common scenario where we live.
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