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Atkins?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 22 Replies
Anyone have good results? In thinking about doing it, just was curious if any would recommend it.
Posted by Anonymous on Apr. 3, 2013 at 12:57 AM
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Replies (1-10):
LucyHourglass
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 12:59 AM

Dont do the atkins diet, do the paleo diet. its healthier.

LucyHourglass
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 12:59 AM

also i'm seeing AMAZING results on the paleo diet.

LucyMom08
by BS Intolerant on Apr. 3, 2013 at 12:59 AM

 Why? It's a gimmick diet...unless you plan on never eating carbs again...

 

 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 3, 2013 at 1:04 AM
You can eat carbs on Atkins you just get them from veggies instead of bread/pasta.

My sister did medifast and had great results. Medifast is also a reduced carb diet. I believe it's the process of ketosis that allows you to lose so much weight.


Quoting LucyMom08:

 Why? It's a gimmick diet...unless you plan on never eating carbs again...


 


 


Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 3, 2013 at 1:09 AM

What Are the Risks Linked to High Protein, Low-Carb Diets?

High protein, low-carb diets can cause a number of health problems, including:

  • Kidney failure. Consuming too much protein puts a strain on the kidneys, which can make a person susceptible to kidney disease.
  • High cholesterol. It is well known that high-protein diets (consisting of red meat, whole dairy products, and other high fat foods) are linked to high cholesterol. Studies have linked high cholesterol levels to an increased risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and cancer.
  • Osteoporosis and kidney stones. High-protein diets have also been shown to cause people to excrete a large amount of calcium in their urine. Over a prolonged period of time, this can increase a person's risk of osteoporosis and kidney stones. A diet that increases protein at the expense of a very restrictive intake of plant carbohydrates may be bad for bones, but not necessarily a high-protein intake alone.
  • Cancer. One of the reasons high-protein diets increase the risks of certain health problems is because of the avoidance of carbohydrate-containing foods and the vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants they contain. It is therefore important to obtain your protein from a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Not only are your needs for protein being met, but you are also helping to reduce your risk of developing cancer.
  • Unhealthy metabolic state (ketosis). Low-carb diets can cause your body to go into a dangerous metabolic state called ketosis since your body burns fat instead of glucose for energy. During ketosis, the body forms substances known as ketones, which can cause organs to fail and result in gout, kidney stones, or kidney failure. Ketones can also dull a person's appetite, cause nausea and bad breath. Ketosis can be prevented by eating at least 100 grams of carbohydrates a day.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 3, 2013 at 1:10 AM

 

Is a Low-Carb Diet Right for Me?

These theories of weight loss remain unproven, and most experts are concerned that high-protein, low-carb diets can cause a host of problems, particularly for the large segment of the population that is at risk for heart disease. What's more, the plan doesn't permit a high intake of fruits and vegetables, recommended by most nutrition experts because of the numerous documented health benefits from these foods.

The experts say to achieve permanent weight loss you must change your lifestyle. This means following a lower calorie diet that includes grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables combined with participating in regular physical activity.

Before starting this or any diet, be sure to talk with your doctor to determine what approach is right for you.

raeyliNlilysmom
by Silver Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 1:11 AM
No it sucks!!!!
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Apr. 3, 2013 at 1:13 AM
When I started atkins I lost 40-50 pounds. That was about 9 years ago I'd say. I guess you can say I'm still on the "diet" to this day, and my weight has stayed pretty level except during pregnancies. I don't consider it a diet anymore, its just the way I eat now.
zoo003
by Platinum Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 1:14 AM

I can tell you that my fil has been on the atkins diet for a few years and altough he refuses to see it, for the last  year, he has looked very sick and unhealthy.  I was on it for awhile and I would not recommend it to anyone. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 3, 2013 at 1:25 AM

 

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans released in 2010 recommends that 45 percent to 65 percent of daily calories come from carbohydrates. The Atkins Die, on the other hand, is a low-carb diet advocating a carbohydrate intake below 10 percent in daily intake in the first phase of the program. Critics of the Atkins diet say it is unsafe because of the low-carb intake it promotes. However, according to the 2005 "Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein and Amino Acids," by the Institute of Medicine, carbs are not required for life as long as the diet provides sufficient amounts of protein and fat, just like the Atkins diet does.

 

Regarding Ketosis:

The ketosis induced by the Atkins diet is not hazardous to your health, but many have confused ketosis with ketoacidosis, a truly dangerous condition associated with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes that does not involve ketosis and the Atkins diet

Long-Term Impact

Some studies have evaluated the long-term impact of low-carb diets, such as Atkins, in those who have used the diet and are obese, have high cholesterol and/or have type 2 diabetes, concluding that this way of eating is safe. A study published in 2004 in "Annals of Internal Medicine" showed that obese participants with high blood cholesterol had significant improvements after following an Atkins-style low-carb diet for 24 weeks, compared with the low-fat diet group. The low-carb group lost an average of 20.7 lbs., decreased their triglycerides by 74.2 mg/dL and boosted their "good" HDL cholesterol by 5.5 mg/dL. Another study in the August 2008 issue of "Nutrition and Metabolism" said people with type 2 diabetes benefited from a lower body weight and improved glycemic control after 44 months of following a low-carb diet


My point:
There is a study for everything.  Thank you for the info, but I just wanted to know what peoples results were.


Quoting Anonymous:

What Are the Risks Linked to High Protein, Low-Carb Diets?

High protein, low-carb diets can cause a number of health problems, including:

  • Kidney failure. Consuming too much protein puts a strain on the kidneys, which can make a person susceptible to kidney disease.
  • High cholesterol. It is well known that high-protein diets (consisting of red meat, whole dairy products, and other high fat foods) are linked to high cholesterol. Studies have linked high cholesterol levels to an increased risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and cancer.
  • Osteoporosis and kidney stones. High-protein diets have also been shown to cause people to excrete a large amount of calcium in their urine. Over a prolonged period of time, this can increase a person's risk of osteoporosis and kidney stones. A diet that increases protein at the expense of a very restrictive intake of plant carbohydrates may be bad for bones, but not necessarily a high-protein intake alone.
  • Cancer. One of the reasons high-protein diets increase the risks of certain health problems is because of the avoidance of carbohydrate-containing foods and the vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants they contain. It is therefore important to obtain your protein from a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Not only are your needs for protein being met, but you are also helping to reduce your risk of developing cancer.
  • Unhealthy metabolic state (ketosis). Low-carb diets can cause your body to go into a dangerous metabolic state called ketosis since your body burns fat instead of glucose for energy. During ketosis, the body forms substances known as ketones, which can cause organs to fail and result in gout, kidney stones, or kidney failure. Ketones can also dull a person's appetite, cause nausea and bad breath. Ketosis can be prevented by eating at least 100 grams of carbohydrates a day.


 

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