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my dog is peeing blood :(

Posted by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:36 PM
  • 14 Replies

We just got a german shepherd puppy about a month ago. She is 9 weeks old. I noticed she was peeing blood around 8 tonight. We called a few people and they said as along as she is being active and drinking and eating she should be fine until the morning. Im thinking she has a UTI because when she will pee she will whine a little. I feel so bad for her. I will be calling the vet in the morning but I just wanted to see you ladies thought.


by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:36 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:37 PM

worms?? we had a dog do that. they died.

DEJavu17
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:37 PM

 sounds like a UTI. Get her to the Vet asap!

firespurity
by Emerald Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:38 PM
sounds like uti. They can progress quickly so go first thing in the morning.
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:38 PM

Causes of Blood in Dog Urine

  • Urinary Tract Infections

Affected dogs exhibit blood in the urine often accompanied by other key symptoms such as frequent urination, painful urination, straining, licking genitals and fever. The condition can be easily treated with a course of antibiotics.

  • Bladder stones

Bladder stones also known as uroliths, are not uncommon in dogs. The two most common types of bladder stones found in dogs are: struvite stones and calcium oxalate stones. Dogs will bladder stones will develop painful urination, straining and bloody urine. Treatment mainly consists of dietary changes and in the case of large stones, surgical removal.

  • Prostate Infections

Prostrate infections occur only in intact male dogs. Symptoms suggesting prostate infection in dogs consist of: bloody urine, enlarged prostrate, difficult and painful urination, straining, lack of appetite and fever.

  • Estrus Cycle

While it may be obvious that an intact female dog will bleed during their heat cycle, there are novice dog owners that may not be aware of this occurrence. A dog will go in heat around six months of age and will produce some vaginal bleeding and vaginal swelling during their first week. Then the bleeding will halt after approximately 7-10 days and will be replaced by a straw colored fluid. This is generally when the dog is ready to mate.

  • Uterine Infections (Pyometra)

Uterine Infections occur only in intact female dogs. Often owners confuse pyometra with the dog's heat cycle, but are often surprised that a second heat has occurred only a few weeks after the last heat. This however, is typical of pyometra, presenting often between 4 to 8 weeks after the last heat. This condition can become quickly life-threatening.

When the pyometra is open female dogs will develop a foul, mucous, bloody vaginal discharge often resembling tomato soup. In this case, dogs are often given antibiotics to clear up the infections, fluids to hydrate them and often they uterus is removed.

  • Tick Born diseases

These annoying and disgusting creatures are known to cause various tick borne diseases that may cause bloody urine among other symptoms.

  • Poisons

The most common poison that causes bloody discharges is rodent poison. Dogs that ingest rat poisons containing Warfarin will develop blood clotting disorders and bloody urine may be a symptom.

There can be other various causes of bloody urine in dogs. Among these are trauma to the bladder and some forms of cancer involving the urinary or reproductive system.


Dogs exhibiting blood in the urine should always be seen by a veterinarian. In order to help a veterinarian come to a diagnosis quickly, a urine sample may be helpful. A small teaspoon size will generally suffix and the urine should be collected in a sterile container, possibly dated with the pet's name and the time it was collected.Urine samples should be very fresh, not older than 4 hours long. It is best to refrigerate the sample.

bowribbonmama
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:38 PM
I agree about the UTI.
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danandsamsmom
by Gold Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:39 PM
My cat did the same thing one time. It was an easily treated uti.
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GoddessNDaRuff
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:39 PM
Get her to the vet poor puppy. She needs medicine!
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:39 PM

I had a female dog that did that (shortly after she was spayed), it was a UTI, very easily fixed by the vet.  Get her to the vet ASAP.  Also she might need to pee more frequently, so keep an eye out.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:39 PM
Aww poor thing! If its a uti does it mean the pup was sitting in her own poop?
MommynMonster
by Silver Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:41 PM

Shes right about the age for her cycle to start, but get her to the vets anyways to make sure its nothing serious

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