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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Boys are NOT necessarily more immature than girls.

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

I am so sick of seeing this myth, stereotype, whatever you want to call it.

I have 2 boys, and they are plenty immature; I have lots of friends with girls who are just as immature as my boys if not more so in some ways.

I am tired of people saying boys need to be redshirted (meaning held back from Kindergarten another year if they turn 5 in the summer), I believe EVERY child is an individual and should not be grouped into some lump category based on gender.

My older son is 7 1/2 now and in 2nd grade. He started K at a young 5, he turned 5 two weeks before Kinder started. He had been in Prek for going on 3 yrs, he was in daycare and they start teaching at 2 1/2 or before.

He was ready so we sent him and he did great and still does great. He has been on the Honor Roll every grading period since K, is in the Accelerated Reader Program, he is very smart. ANd his teachers don't think he is any more immature than any of the other kids, boy or girl.

I just want to say, your child is an individual. Just because he's a boy doesn't mean he isn't ready for school.

Posted by Anonymous on Apr. 19, 2013 at 10:52 AM
Replies (31-40):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 19, 2013 at 11:40 AM

I feel the same as you regarding ADHD and similar terms. Overused and overabused, many children are overmedicated and I find that particularly sad. My own 7 yr old has a tendency to daydream and not pay attention in class, his teachers know this and we have had parent teacher conferences over this. Thankfully none of them think he has ADHD or it hasn't been mentioned. My Best friend has an 11 yr old boy, he is very smart but his school wants him in ADHD meds, I advised her not to medicate him, there are other ways to help kids rather than turn them into zombies. I've seen my cousin medicate her son since he was 4 or 5 and the kid is practically a zombie every time I see him.

Quoting yperez0209:

I agree with you, this type of thing gets under my skin. It also bothers me that so many boys are medicated when all they need is some time with a football and the ability to run around. Granted some really do have ADD or ADHD or whatever else the medical world can label them in order to make money. Why is there such a push to make boys behave, well, like girls? They are different and both equally challenging.

I have three boys and two girls. And I will tell you my 7yr old can easily be classified as one of those A terms but I choose to work with him. He has his good days and bad days in school but I work with his teacher and we use techniques to help him along. My son gets straight A's, it is possible.


yperez0209
by on Apr. 19, 2013 at 11:47 AM

Oh my, it saddens me to read what you wrote about your cousin. It's been proven that one hour of exercise releases the same chemicals in the brain as many of these tranquilizing medications. Just put the kid in karate. It's a given that there are cases of children ( not just boys ) that need it to function. I rather work with my son. This marking period we started a sticker behavioral chart that I sign daily and that has really helped him. 

About the zombie comment.... it's so true.

Quoting Anonymous:

I feel the same as you regarding ADHD and similar terms. Overused and overabused, many children are overmedicated and I find that particularly sad. My own 7 yr old has a tendency to daydream and not pay attention in class, his teachers know this and we have had parent teacher conferences over this. Thankfully none of them think he has ADHD or it hasn't been mentioned. My Best friend has an 11 yr old boy, he is very smart but his school wants him in ADHD meds, I advised her not to medicate him, there are other ways to help kids rather than turn them into zombies. I've seen my cousin medicate her son since he was 4 or 5 and the kid is practically a zombie every time I see him.

Quoting yperez0209:

I agree with you, this type of thing gets under my skin. It also bothers me that so many boys are medicated when all they need is some time with a football and the ability to run around. Granted some really do have ADD or ADHD or whatever else the medical world can label them in order to make money. Why is there such a push to make boys behave, well, like girls? They are different and both equally challenging.

I have three boys and two girls. And I will tell you my 7yr old can easily be classified as one of those A terms but I choose to work with him. He has his good days and bad days in school but I work with his teacher and we use techniques to help him along. My son gets straight A's, it is possible.



nybor48
by Member on Apr. 19, 2013 at 11:51 AM

 then explain all the grown men that go out and have babies and don't take care of them.....

matofour
by Silver Member on Apr. 19, 2013 at 11:51 AM
1 mom liked this
Boys brains ARE different than girls.

It's a fact, it can't be argued.

Boys tend to be active learners. Boys tend to do better when older starting K. Boys tend to be much more hands on learners (touch, feel, movement).

Girls tend to be more docile. More passive.

And at the age of 4, better in control of their bodies.

Boys tend to have a harder time sitting still, which leads to the term immaturity. Because they want to actively learn, not sit at a desk for six hours a day.

Redshirting not only benefits boys, it benefits girls.

And truth be told, if your oldest is only in 2, you don't know what the future will bring. You don't know how them being younger will affect them as they get older (because puberty is going to come In to play).

I understand every child is an individual. But, many of these stats about the differences in boys and girls are given after many studies and many years of experts watching boys and girls in school settings. And these things aren't said to put down boys, they are said so people understand there are just inborn differences between the sexes we can't deny.

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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 19, 2013 at 11:51 AM

it IS sad. That poor kid has been medicated for probably 10 years now, he is like 14 or 15 now. I sometimes wonder what he would be like if he hadn't been medicated so young and so long.

Quoting yperez0209:

Oh my, it saddens me to read what you wrote about your cousin. It's been proven that one hour of exercise releases the same chemicals in the brain as many of these tranquilizing medications. Just put the kid in karate. It's a given that there are cases of children ( not just boys ) that need it to function. I rather work with my son. This marking period we started a sticker behavioral chart that I sign daily and that has really helped him. 

About the zombie comment.... it's so true.

Quoting Anonymous:

I feel the same as you regarding ADHD and similar terms. Overused and overabused, many children are overmedicated and I find that particularly sad. My own 7 yr old has a tendency to daydream and not pay attention in class, his teachers know this and we have had parent teacher conferences over this. Thankfully none of them think he has ADHD or it hasn't been mentioned. My Best friend has an 11 yr old boy, he is very smart but his school wants him in ADHD meds, I advised her not to medicate him, there are other ways to help kids rather than turn them into zombies. I've seen my cousin medicate her son since he was 4 or 5 and the kid is practically a zombie every time I see him.

Quoting yperez0209:

I agree with you, this type of thing gets under my skin. It also bothers me that so many boys are medicated when all they need is some time with a football and the ability to run around. Granted some really do have ADD or ADHD or whatever else the medical world can label them in order to make money. Why is there such a push to make boys behave, well, like girls? They are different and both equally challenging.

I have three boys and two girls. And I will tell you my 7yr old can easily be classified as one of those A terms but I choose to work with him. He has his good days and bad days in school but I work with his teacher and we use techniques to help him along. My son gets straight A's, it is possible.




Gardeningmom4
by Ruby Member on Apr. 19, 2013 at 11:55 AM

blowing kisses

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:00 PM

I still don't believe redshirting benefits any kids at all. I'm not saying their brains aren't different and I'm not trying to refute any proven facts.

Quoting matofour:

Boys brains ARE different than girls.

It's a fact, it can't be argued.

Boys tend to be active learners. Boys tend to do better when older starting K. Boys tend to be much more hands on learners (touch, feel, movement).

Girls tend to be more docile. More passive.

And at the age of 4, better in control of their bodies.

Boys tend to have a harder time sitting still, which leads to the term immaturity. Because they want to actively learn, not sit at a desk for six hours a day.

Redshirting not only benefits boys, it benefits girls.

And truth be told, if your oldest is only in 2, you don't know what the future will bring. You don't know how them being younger will affect them as they get older (because puberty is going to come In to play).

I understand every child is an individual. But, many of these stats about the differences in boys and girls are given after many studies and many years of experts watching boys and girls in school settings. And these things aren't said to put down boys, they are said so people understand there are just inborn differences between the sexes we can't deny.


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:01 PM

That has nothing to do with this post.....

Quoting nybor48:

 then explain all the grown men that go out and have babies and don't take care of them.....


STVUstudent
by Silver Member on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:14 PM

I agree.  I have twins- a boy and a girl.  They turned 5 just before the age cutoff, and were actually 4 when kindergarten started.  Twin boy handled it much better than twin girl... he is much more mature, and also much stronger academically.  If not for his size (he is very small), no one would believe he is only kindergarten...

supercarp
by on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:19 PM

My brother's birthday is September 25th and he started kindergarten when he was 4. He ended up being in the top ten in his graduating class and captain of the swim team.

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