Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Which people should be allowed to get special treatment at an amusement park?

Posted by   + Show Post

I understand that people with physical disabilities, such as those in wheelchairs, will need some special assistance, a guest services pass. Hearing impaired people will need interpreters. But what other conditions? I have a friend whose son has Type 1 diabetes. Should he be allowed to skip the line at Six Flags or other amusement parks? Should a child with severe anxiety be allowed special treatment at an amusement park? Which conditions require special treatment? And I'm not bashing anyone who feels like their child needs this treatment. I'm just curious as to what other people think.

by on May. 4, 2013 at 9:20 PM
Replies (731-739):
kickymac
by on May. 11, 2013 at 8:51 PM

My son was the recipient of Make a Wish and he chose Disney.  We were able to move ahead in the lines and you should have seen the looks we would get because at that time, my son did not look ill.  I hope that you are able to wait in line because that means that you do not have a life threatening illness.  People are granted this special treatment for a very good reason because time is more precious than you know.  Next time you see someone getting this special treatment, don't be jealous, be thankful that you are not in their situation.

Pazamia
by on May. 15, 2013 at 4:47 PM

If you don't have an illness or disability just hush.  You don't have no idea what we go through.  I get around with crutches because of CP.  I am grateful for the privilege of cutting in line.  I can't stand for long periods, then I start getting tired.  I am sorry you don't  think it's fair.  Just be grateful you are healthy and have some compassion for those who are not.

PrincessTam
by on May. 18, 2013 at 3:59 AM


Yes you can at Six Flags but do you realize how EXPENSIVE they are...I think Fast Passes are the worst thing ever. It just teaches our kids that money CAN buy anything...

Quoting jillbailey26:

Well, there are passes you can buy to skip to the front of the line in some places.  They do have them at Disney, but I don't know about Six Flags.  Anyone can buy them, if I remember correctly.

Quoting pce68:

My friend get a pass for her son every time they go to Six Flags, and I assume every time they go to Disney. He has Type 1 diabetes, which yes is a serious condition, but they have everything he needs with them at all times, so I don't see why they need to skip lines or go in a special line to wait. When he went to Six Flags with my church group, there were rides that he and his friends got to ride that nobody else in our group got to go on bc the lines were too long, but bc he is diabetic he got to skip the line. Didn't seem fair to me.

Quoting jillbailey26:

Anyone who wants to be "treated like everyone else" should be treated like everyone else.  That includes waiting in like.





momto2crazykids
by Silver Member on May. 18, 2013 at 4:03 AM

 obviously your not fat so you don't know how tired we get


Quoting pce68:

WTH kind of answer is this?

Quoting Anonymous:

I think Fat people should be able to get special treatment. They can't stand in line as long, move to the front. Can't walk as far, ride in an electric scooter thing. Yes, fat people should get special treatment.

WTH kind of post is this? 



 

Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 19, 2013 at 3:58 PM
Staff at Disney have always been very accommodating for me and my kids. I have M.S. so waiting in lines, especially in the heat is very difficult. In the high heat of the day, they would take notice of where we entered the line, they would let us go inside the air conditioning to wait, then re-enter the line where we left it. Of course, there were only the three of us, not a whole group. With ONE adult, and young children, yes the accommodations SHOULD be made for the entire group, as it was for us. However, if there are more than ONE adult in the group, or if the other group members are capable of being on their own, then it should only be for the person with the disability plus maximum of two others. As long as there are at least 2 others left. My reasoning for this is that it also would not be fair for the other non assistance person to have to ride alone either. The last time that I took my kids, my ds was 8 and dd was 5. Rides that ds could go on, but not dd? They allowed dd and I to wait at the exit for ds. And since we've spent so much time there,there were a few times that I wanted to go on a ride and the 3 of us would go together. The kids and I also memorized the park including the locations of all of the 'cooling stations' and we would plan our excursions around them. We were also able to plan the day so that we were going to indoor shows and events during the hottest parts of the day to cool off, which made the day go easier. What annoyed me though, were the people who took advantage of the system. One day I was having a lot of mobility issues. I was moving slowly and I felt quite weak. Even my kids could see that I was struggling. We were considering getting a wheel chair, but when we got there, they were out. I get it. People get the chairs for their elderly relatives so that Grandma and Pops can enjoy their day at the park with the grandchildren. It's quite disconcerning when we would see the child (who we had just seen prancing around the park) sitting in the wheel chair while grandma with her support hose and sensible shoes is shuffling along behind the wheelchair struggling to push it b/c the kid weights almost as much (if not more than) she does. If you really think that your 10 y/o needs a stroller, and yes I have seen kids that age in strollers at WDW, and you are willing to pay for it, that is your business. I know that most parents of stroller age children will have their own stroller with them. And I believe that the elderly (AARP qualified ~ so please don't scream "age discrimination!") should have first entitlement to the rental wheelchairs. For many of them, they don't have their own wheelchairs b/c they wouldn't be using them on a regular basis. For people that are 'in' a wheel chair, chances are that they already have their chair with them. For the rest of the chairs, it would be seem impossible to determine who's disability is completely legit. With M.S, (like other auto-immunes such as Lupus) one day I am fine the next, not so. But I think that there needs to be a way devised to determine who should have entitlement to the rental of a wheel chair or assistance vs. not. I think that that way should be universal and anyone who would expect the special treatment needs to honestly divulge that information. We give blue parking placards to people to identify them as disabled people, so that when they park their cars in the handicap spots they are not towed. So why can't something like that be implemented in the parks? I think that most people with these types of situations don't just 'decide' to go to the park. It would take some planning, and part of that planning would be taking into consideration any issues your group may have. So yes, I believe that wheelchairs should be available for rental to those that legitimately need it. However, I also believe that the park staff should reserve the right to confiscate any wheelchair that is being misused (races? carrying packages?) or used by a person other than who it was rented for (grandma pushing a school age grandchild?), or being used by more than one person at a time (kids riding on grandma's lap? ~ and I'm not talking about babies who have not yet started to walk yet here). If families knew that they could lose the use of the chair and will end up having to leave grandma on a park bench all day, hopefully they would not be abusing the system. As far as devices such as audio assistance aids? Rent them like the wheel chairs are rented. OR collect id and have each one signed out and returned after each person uses it.
Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 30, 2013 at 8:04 PM
Glad to hear that your daughter is still with you. I love Make a Wish. Even none terminal children have the opportunity of Make a Wish. My friend's son has leukemia and went to Disney. He is very lucky. He got it when he was 4. He is 8 now and doing great. Hopefully it stays in remission forever. Whether he does or not, he still has one more Make a Wish opportunity before he is 18. It is a FABULOUS gift to families and children with life threatening illnesses. Good luck with your battle. My prayers are with your daughter, and your family. As for skipping the lines, it is hard not to question an otherwise healthy looking person moving to the front, but no matter what the reason, there is a REASON! :-)
coolwavves
by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 7:19 PM


Obviously, no one is obligated to do anything for anyone.  Unfortunately for you, parks and people with empathy and compassion feel differently, thank goodness.  How much weight did you carry by allowing "some obviously disabled kid" to go in front of you?  Did it mess up some portion of your day?  Did you feel immensely heavy carrying that burden of doing something nice for someone else???  I miss the days when people cared for one another and weren't just out for themselves.    

Quoting Anonymous:

Im not judging anyone. Having "more" (I doubt more, just different) issues in life than others does not mean other should be expected to carry your weight. Would I let some obviously disabled kid in front of me, its likely and has happened, its the expectation of them to that gets me and GOBryan clearly has that expectation. It the attitude that everyone is obligated to do something for you.

Quoting coolwavves:


Well put GOBryan! 

I think it may be a waste of time talking to "anonymous" as they simply have no empathy or understanding regarding autism or the special needs population in general.  As far as it goes anonymous, GOBryan was trying to give you insight.  With the numbers increasing, I wouldn't be surprised if your life is soon touched by autism and may it give you some compassion and courtesy.  We all have our own struggles, so who are you to judge others?

Quoting Anonymous:

Youre sitting here telling others life isn't fair so they are obligated to deal with YOUR problem. Life isn't fair to anyone so why should you get special treatment? People may let you in line in front of them but that doesn't mean they SHOULD.

Quoting GOBryan:

I think that's what I said. Life ISN'T fair so I don't know what your comment means. Exactly, it isn't but better to be have a few minutes of inconvenience to help another than a lifetime. 

Quoting Anonymous:

Someone could be saying the same thing to you. Life isn't fair so back of the line with ya.



Quoting GOBryan:

What many of you fail to understand is that these parks provide disabled passes in order for people to enjoy the parks or they would simply not attend and that would hurt their revenue. There are tens of thousands of persons with disabilities that attend the parks every year who would never have the opportunity to do so. 

No, life isn't fair. I ended up with two children with Autism and have to handle behavior issues and disability issues everyday while many of you have normal children and will never have to deal with the unfairness of the disability. So if you have to be put out for a short time due to a disabled child then consider yourself lucky that it's nothing compared to what we have to deal with everyday. 

No.. It may not be fair that you have to wait a little longer in line while my little boy and girl get a chance they wouldn't have otherwise. It's not fair that your child can speak and attend normal classes and have a normal chance at life while mine are quiet and will need assistance the rest of their life. 

Yes.. life isn't fair. 







Anonymous
by Anonymous on Jul. 17, 2013 at 11:16 PM
And I miss the days when people were out exploiting a small situation for personal, selfish, gain. Wanna complain... try doing so to those who take advantage rather than those who are sick of being taken advantage of. Guess what, if you know your child has some type of issue, then it is on you to care for that issue not everyone else. If others want to then great but no one is obligated. Don't sit here and turn it into a pity party people have no compassion bit (what is this, like a month later even... wtf). Everyone has problems.

Quoting coolwavves:


Obviously, no one is obligated to do anything for anyone.  Unfortunately for you, parks and people with empathy and compassion feel differently, thank goodness.  How much weight did you carry by allowing "some obviously disabled kid" to go in front of you?  Did it mess up some portion of your day?  Did you feel immensely heavy carrying that burden of doing something nice for someone else???  I miss the days when people cared for one another and weren't just out for themselves.    


Quoting Anonymous:

Im not judging anyone. Having "more" (I doubt more, just different) issues in life than others does not mean other should be expected to carry your weight. Would I let some obviously disabled kid in front of me, its likely and has happened, its the expectation of them to that gets me and GOBryan clearly has that expectation. It the attitude that everyone is obligated to do something for you.

Quoting coolwavves:


Well put GOBryan! 

I think it may be a waste of time talking to "anonymous" as they simply have no empathy or understanding regarding autism or the special needs population in general.  As far as it goes anonymous, GOBryan was trying to give you insight.  With the numbers increasing, I wouldn't be surprised if your life is soon touched by autism and may it give you some compassion and courtesy.  We all have our own struggles, so who are you to judge others?


Quoting Anonymous:

Youre sitting here telling others life isn't fair so they are obligated to deal with YOUR problem. Life isn't fair to anyone so why should you get special treatment? People may let you in line in front of them but that doesn't mean they SHOULD.



Quoting GOBryan:

I think that's what I said. Life ISN'T fair so I don't know what your comment means. Exactly, it isn't but better to be have a few minutes of inconvenience to help another than a lifetime. 

Quoting Anonymous:

Someone could be saying the same thing to you. Life isn't fair so back of the line with ya.





Quoting GOBryan:

What many of you fail to understand is that these parks provide disabled passes in order for people to enjoy the parks or they would simply not attend and that would hurt their revenue. There are tens of thousands of persons with disabilities that attend the parks every year who would never have the opportunity to do so. 

No, life isn't fair. I ended up with two children with Autism and have to handle behavior issues and disability issues everyday while many of you have normal children and will never have to deal with the unfairness of the disability. So if you have to be put out for a short time due to a disabled child then consider yourself lucky that it's nothing compared to what we have to deal with everyday. 

No.. It may not be fair that you have to wait a little longer in line while my little boy and girl get a chance they wouldn't have otherwise. It's not fair that your child can speak and attend normal classes and have a normal chance at life while mine are quiet and will need assistance the rest of their life. 

Yes.. life isn't fair. 









Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)