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birth control options for those who cant handle excess hormones?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 24 Replies

so i cannot handle hormonal birth control. it causes really bad abdominal pain and headaches. ive tried seasonique, lo estrin (i think thats what its called) and ive also tried the nuva ring and all 3 made me want to die. i tried this one pill i ordered online that was non hormonal pills i took once a week and it worked great for 4 months until i developed cysts in both ovaries that doubled the size of them. so now im 23 weeks pregnant and have no idea what to do when this babies born. im really not wanting to do the iud it scares me. anyone with similar BC issues that have any reccomendations? 

Posted by Anonymous on May. 7, 2013 at 11:00 AM
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Replies (1-10):
peanutsmommy1
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2013 at 11:00 AM

there is always condoms

notjstanothrmom
by Ruby Member on May. 7, 2013 at 11:01 AM
3 moms liked this
We use natural family planning. Effective and none hormonal or invasive.
TiffanyRose06
by Queso<3 on May. 7, 2013 at 11:01 AM
Hm... I think the pills they give bfing moms are non hormonal
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 7, 2013 at 11:02 AM


Quoting peanutsmommy1:

there is always condoms

i should've added that when me and dh to have sex i tend to tear slightly due to his size, its not too bad but if we use lube or anything it gets in the torn area and burns really bad and makes it even worse

stephy_85
by Silver Member on May. 7, 2013 at 11:03 AM
Natural family planning and condoms is what dh and I will be doing once he returns from Afghanistan. We also did that until I weaned our youngest son.
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Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 7, 2013 at 11:03 AM


Quoting TiffanyRose06:

Hm... I think the pills they give bfing moms are non hormonal

i havent found any non hormonal fda approved pills yet :/

MamaFLgurl
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2013 at 11:04 AM
1 mom liked this

 I have the Paragard IUD. I LOVE it.  I looked up some other ideas. Here's a pretty good list I found.

Nonhormonal Methods

Nonhormonal methods of birth control include methods that provide a barrier between the sperm and the egg. Barrier methods are generally not as effective as long-term or hormonal methods, but when used correctly and consistently their effectiveness can approach that of the pill.

Some of the barrier methods protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Male condom

What is it?

A male condom is a thin sheath, made out of latex or synthetic materials, that fits over an erect penis and can be used for vaginal, oral, or anal sex.

If condoms are used consistently and correctly, they are an effective method of birth control.

Regardless of what type of birth control method you select, condoms should always be used to protect against STIs, unless both you and your partner have been tested and have no STIs and are only having sex with each other.

Condoms are widely available without a prescription at many drug and grocery stores. Lamb skin condoms are available for those allergic to latex but are not considered as effective. Condoms come in different sizes, textures, flavors and colors, and spermicidal condoms are also available.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, the male condom is 85% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, the male condom is 98% effective.

Condoms and spermicides used together may be just as effective as birth control pills.

The male condom reduces the risk of many STIs.

Who should use it?

Everyone should use a male condom if at risk for a STI. Condoms are a reliable, inexpensive method of birth control but must be used correctly and every time you have sex, which can be difficult.

Some women or men may be allergic to latex, a material used in some condoms.

Male and female condoms should not be used together because the latex could tear.

Female condom

What is it?

The Reality Female Condom is a soft, loose pouch which is inserted into the vagina. Flexible rings at each end hold the pouch in place. The inner ring stays inside the vagina while the outer ring stays outside over the vulva.

The female condom should only be used one time and then discarded. It is prelubricated, but extra lubricant is recommended. It may be inserted up to 8 hours before sex.

Male and female condoms should not be used together because the latex could tear.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, the female condom is 79% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, the female condom is 95% effective

The female condom reduces the risk of many STIs.

Who should use it?

The female condom is a great method for women who do not want to rely on their partner to use a condom and for protection against STIs or an unintended pregnancy.

Vaginal Spermicides

What is it?

Spermicides contain a chemical that kills sperm on contact. They are easily available at drug or grocery stores without a prescription and have few side effects. Spermicides are more effective if they are used with another barrier method, such as a male condom or diaphragm.

Spermicides may be in the form of a gel, foam, cream, contraceptive film, suppository, or tablet. Instructions on how to use a spermicide are provided in the box or can be obtained from your health care provider.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, vaginal spermicides are 71% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, vaginal spermicides are 82% effective.

Spermicide does not protect against STIs.

Who should use it?

Spermicides are a relatively inexpensive form of birth control, that a woman can control, however it must be reapplied for each act of sex and effectiveness decreases after one hour.

Diaphragm

What is it?

The diaphragm is a dome shaped, rubber, flexible, rimmed cup, which is fitted by your healthcare provider. Before sex, a woman inserts the diaphragm into her vagina and covers the cervix creating a barrier to sperm. For added protection, about a tablespoon of spermicide (see above) is used on the inside of the diaphragm in case a sperm makes it over the rim.

If a diaphragm is fit correctly, you should not feel the diaphragm and should be able to wear it comfortably. Your partner may feel the latex of the diaphragm but it should not cause discomfort. You can insert your diaphragm up to 6 hours before sex and it may be left in place no longer than 24 hours after sex.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, the diaphragm is 86% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, the diaphragm is 94% effective.

The diaphragm does not protect against STIs.

Who should use it?

Women often choose the diaphragm, sponge, Fem Cap or Lea’s Shield® when they do not desire a hormonal method of birth control. To use any of these methods, a woman should be comfortable touching herself in order to insert and remove these barrier methods correctly.

Contraceptive Sponge

What is it?

The sponge is a small, soft round piece of synthetic sponge which contains a spermicide (see above). The sponge can be purchased at drug and grocery stores without a prescription. It is inserted into the vagina and over the cervix to create a barrier and to kill sperm. A polyester loop string is provided on the outer surface to assist in the removal of the sponge. You may leave the sponge in place for 24 hours, no matter how many acts of sex occur. The sponge should be left in place for 6 hours after sex before it is removed, so that the spermicide can be effective.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, the contraceptive sponge is 84% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, the contraceptive sponge is 91% effective.

It is less effective in women who have had prior vaginal births.

The contraceptive sponge does not protect against STIs.

Who should use it?

Women often choose the diaphragm, sponge, Fem Cap or Lea’s Shield® when they do not desire a hormonal method of birth control. To use any of these methods, a woman should be comfortable touching herself in order to insert and remove these barrier methods correctly.

Lea’s Shield®

What is it?

Lea’s Shield® is an oval device similar to a diaphragm made of silicon rubber and includes a loop which helps in removal. The shield covers the cervix and is only made in one size so there is no fitting required. In the United States, this method is by prescription only.

Lea’s Shield® is used with a spermicide and must be left in place for eight hours after sex.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, Lea’s Shield® is 84% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, Lea’s Shield® is 91% effective. It is less effective in women who have had prior vaginal births.

The LeaShield®does not protect against STIs.

Who should use it?

Women often choose the diaphragm, sponge, Fem Cap or Lea’s Shield® when they do not desire a hormonal method of birth control. To use any of these methods, a woman should be comfortable touching herself in order to insert and remove these barrier methods correctly.

Cervical Cap (FemCap)

What is it?

The FemCap is a silicon rubber hat-shaped with a brim that flares outward. The bowl of the cap covers the cervix completely. A spermicide is put on the inside and outside of the device before inserting it. The FemCap comes in 3 sizes and must be fit by a health care provider. The Fem Cap must be worn for at least six hours after sex and no longer than 48 hours.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, the FemCap is 85% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, the FemCap is 91% effective. It is less effective in women who have had prior vaginal births.

The FemCap does not protect against STIs.

Who should use it?

Women often choose the diaphragm, sponge, Fem Cap or Lea’s Shield when they do not desire a hormonal method of birth control. To use any of these methods, a woman should be comfortable touching herself in order to insert and remove these barrier methods correctly.

IUD (Intra-Uterine Device)

What is it?

Paragard® Intrauterine Device is a T-shaped copper-releasing device inserted into the uterus by a health care provider. The IUD works by interfering with the movement of the sperm inside the uterus. Sperm die within the uterus before they can fertilize the egg.

Using an IUD may increase the amount of bleeding during your period and increase menstrual cramping.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

The IUD is more than 99% effective and prevents pregnancy for 10 or more years.

The IUD does not protect against STIs.

Who should use it?

Women who want to avoid hormonal methods of birth control, do not desire a pregnancy for an extended period of time and want the convenience of not having to do anything on an ongoing basis.

See also http://www.paragard.com/

Withdrawal or Pull Out Method

What is it?

When the man is about to ejaculate (cum) he withdrawals his penis from the woman’s vagina. Withdrawal may prevent fertilization by decreasing the number of sperm that might fertilize an egg.

Withdrawal is not very effective because it is difficult to perform consistently and the pre-ejaculatory fluid may carry sperm into the vagina.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, withdrawal is 73% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, withdrawal is 96% effective.

Withdrawal does not protect against STIs.

Who should use it?

A couple may use withdrawal when no other method of contraception is available, but withdrawal is not a recommended or reliable method of birth control

Natural Family Planning including the Rhythm or Calendar Method and/or Fertility Awareness

What is it?

Natural family planning monitors the woman’s menstrual cycle in a variety of ways in an effort to determine those days where she is most likely to get pregnant from unprotected sex. The Rhythm method is a mathematical calculation of a woman’s cycle in order to determine periods of fertility and is only effective if a woman has regular 28-day periods. Fertility Awareness requires that the woman daily monitor cervical fluid, temperature and other factors to determine fertile days. In either case, either abstinence or use of a barrier method during fertile times is required in order to prevent pregnancy. Classes are offered and recommended before trying to use this method by yourself.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

With typical use, Natural Family Planning is 80% effective. If used correctly, consistently, and all of the time, Natural Family Planning is 98% effective.

Who should use it?

A woman who has regular twenty eight day cycles and can carefully monitor her fertility on a daily basis. A woman who wants to avoid any religious implications, health risks or side effects from other methods of birth control.

Abstinence

What is it?

Abstinence is refraining from any sexual activity including sex, which occurs when the penis enters the vagina, anus, or mouth.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

100% effective at preventing pregnancy and STIs.

Who should use it?

Those who for religious, cultural or other reasons can commit to not having sex.

Outercourse

What is it?

Outercourse is any kind of sexual activity in which the penis does not enter the vagina, mouth, or anus, such as stimulating each other with hands or rubbing. It allows a couple to be more intimate and even have an orgasm with one another without having sexual sex. With outercourse, no semen (the fluid that comes out of a man’s penis during sex), vaginal fluids, or blood is shared between partners.

How effective is it at preventing pregnancy?

100% effective at preventing pregnancy and STIs if the penis does not enter or come in contact with the vagina, anus or mouth.

Who should use it?

Couples who desire to be sexually intimate and can commit to not having sex.

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 7, 2013 at 11:04 AM


Quoting notjstanothrmom:

We use natural family planning. Effective and none hormonal or invasive.

i was thinking that like just tracking my cycles but i really dont know how to. like idk how long the sperm would live in me and im not sure on tracking ovulation.

kansasmom1978
by on May. 7, 2013 at 11:04 AM

DH was snipped. His choice. I can't take BC cuz of blood clots. And he hates condoms so I said well suck it up or get it snipped. 

TiffanyRose06
by Queso<3 on May. 7, 2013 at 11:05 AM
I wish I could remember what my doctor gave me. Good luck finding something that works for you :)

Quoting Anonymous:


Quoting TiffanyRose06:

Hm... I think the pills they give bfing moms are non hormonal

i havent found any non hormonal fda approved pills yet :/

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