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Special Delicate Snowflakes

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

Couple of posts really have me questioning the thinking of some of the special needs parents in this group...

Here are some of their contentions:

1) Special needs student should not miss a field trip for failing to meet classroom behavior expectations.

2)  Mom of special needs child should not be held financially responsible for the damage her child did at the neighbor's home because she is already burdened by his needs.

Really?  At what point do we not hold these kids and or parents accountable?  Yes they have extra challenges, but are we truly helping them by enabling and excusing bad behavior?

Posted by Anonymous on May. 8, 2013 at 9:17 AM
Replies (201-204):
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 10, 2013 at 8:27 AM

Experts can't even agree as to how Autism should be classified.  Right now, it is actually classifed as a mental disorder.


Quoting Anonymous:

Autism is a physical disability, so that's not a good example given. Perhaps you should educate yourself on autism. I'm not sure exactly what you mean by mental and emotional disability.

The ADA describes a disability as "...a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity.". Perhaps you aren't as educated on the act as you thought.

Typical children without disabilies have been know to get violent in school too. Why single out special needs children? I don't know any school that would allow any child, special needs or not, to throw things and bite people, etc. There are always consequences in place.

All special needs children are not violent, just like all typical children are docile.

Quoting jojo_star:

I am well aware of those, and I probably should have clarified, but I thought it was clear from the post: I'm talking about mental and emotional disabilities, not physical. That is something different. I know the ADA well. I don't know of any law that allows an adult to randomly lash out at people, or cause a loud disturbance, or throw things, or bite peoples legs (Happened in the elementary school in my district, an autistic child bit the teacher and drew blood). That is what I am talking about. Not deaf, blind, or paralyzed.

Quoting Anonymous:

"There aren't special laws in society, why should there be special laws in school?"



I take it that you are not familiar with the Americans With Disabilities Act. Yes, there are special accommodations for those with special needs in the adult world.





So, by your logic, children in wheelchairs should have to be able to go upstairs. Deaf children should be able to hear the intercom.



A child with autism can be the complete opposite of deaf child in that they hear the fire alarm extremely amplified. Of course, they would have to be taught what to do in case of an actual emergency, but why would they need to be subjected to torture (and yes that would be considered torture) in non-emergencies.





Quoting jojo_star:

Why? If the child gets special preference, especially in something like that, that puts the child, all the children, and the teachers, at a greater risk. If the child has never had a 'normal' drill, he/she won't know how to react. That will endanger the other children, because someone will need to make sure the SN child gets out and is safe, and that might be to the detriment of the other children. I stand by what I said. The same rules for all children. There aren't special laws in society, why should there be special laws in school? If they can't abide by the same rules as everyone else, they need to leave. 

Quoting Anonymous:

I would certainly hope that a school wouldn't allow bad behavior. However, they do need to accommodate special needs. An example would be to allow the child to exit the building before the fire alarm goes off when there is a fire drill.





Quoting jojo_star:

Exactly. And allowing special rules, allowing bad and disruptive behavior, is not going to get them there, not to mention it causes a disturbance for the other children. 

Quoting Anonymous:

They are put in public school to learn how to act. They just need the help to get there.







Quoting jojo_star:

I disagree with both. Special needs kids are either special and deserve special accommodations, which means NOT public school with all the other children, or they do deserve to be in public school to be integrated, but then, they have to play by the same rules as everyone else. You can't have it both ways. Either they are in public school, with regular kids, to adjust and learn how to live and act properly, or they are special children who deserve special consideration and circumstances, but then they don't have any business being with everyone else. 






Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 10, 2013 at 10:00 AM
1 mom liked this
It's a neurological disorder.

Quoting Anonymous:

Experts can't even agree as to how Autism should be classified.  Right now, it is actually classifed as a mental disorder.



Quoting Anonymous:

Autism is a physical disability, so that's not a good example given. Perhaps you should educate yourself on autism. I'm not sure exactly what you mean by mental and emotional disability.



The ADA describes a disability as "...a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity.". Perhaps you aren't as educated on the act as you thought.



Typical children without disabilies have been know to get violent in school too. Why single out special needs children? I don't know any school that would allow any child, special needs or not, to throw things and bite people, etc. There are always consequences in place.



All special needs children are not violent, just like all typical children are docile.



Quoting jojo_star:

I am well aware of those, and I probably should have clarified, but I thought it was clear from the post: I'm talking about mental and emotional disabilities, not physical. That is something different. I know the ADA well. I don't know of any law that allows an adult to randomly lash out at people, or cause a loud disturbance, or throw things, or bite peoples legs (Happened in the elementary school in my district, an autistic child bit the teacher and drew blood). That is what I am talking about. Not deaf, blind, or paralyzed.

Quoting Anonymous:

"There aren't special laws in society, why should there be special laws in school?"





I take it that you are not familiar with the Americans With Disabilities Act. Yes, there are special accommodations for those with special needs in the adult world.








So, by your logic, children in wheelchairs should have to be able to go upstairs. Deaf children should be able to hear the intercom.





A child with autism can be the complete opposite of deaf child in that they hear the fire alarm extremely amplified. Of course, they would have to be taught what to do in case of an actual emergency, but why would they need to be subjected to torture (and yes that would be considered torture) in non-emergencies.








Quoting jojo_star:

Why? If the child gets special preference, especially in something like that, that puts the child, all the children, and the teachers, at a greater risk. If the child has never had a 'normal' drill, he/she won't know how to react. That will endanger the other children, because someone will need to make sure the SN child gets out and is safe, and that might be to the detriment of the other children. I stand by what I said. The same rules for all children. There aren't special laws in society, why should there be special laws in school? If they can't abide by the same rules as everyone else, they need to leave. 

Quoting Anonymous:

I would certainly hope that a school wouldn't allow bad behavior. However, they do need to accommodate special needs. An example would be to allow the child to exit the building before the fire alarm goes off when there is a fire drill.







Quoting jojo_star:

Exactly. And allowing special rules, allowing bad and disruptive behavior, is not going to get them there, not to mention it causes a disturbance for the other children. 

Quoting Anonymous:

They are put in public school to learn how to act. They just need the help to get there.









Quoting jojo_star:

I disagree with both. Special needs kids are either special and deserve special accommodations, which means NOT public school with all the other children, or they do deserve to be in public school to be integrated, but then, they have to play by the same rules as everyone else. You can't have it both ways. Either they are in public school, with regular kids, to adjust and learn how to live and act properly, or they are special children who deserve special consideration and circumstances, but then they don't have any business being with everyone else. 







Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 10, 2013 at 10:52 AM

One anon says physical... one anon says neuro... Some say mental...

To me it doesn't really seem to make a difference either way... They are all connected and most disorders can fall into at least 2 catagories.

Do you find the term mental disorder offensive?  If so, why?


Quoting Anonymous:

It's a neurological disorder.

Quoting Anonymous:

Experts can't even agree as to how Autism should be classified.  Right now, it is actually classifed as a mental disorder.



Quoting Anonymous:

Autism is a physical disability, so that's not a good example given. Perhaps you should educate yourself on autism. I'm not sure exactly what you mean by mental and emotional disability.



The ADA describes a disability as "...a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity.". Perhaps you aren't as educated on the act as you thought.



Typical children without disabilies have been know to get violent in school too. Why single out special needs children? I don't know any school that would allow any child, special needs or not, to throw things and bite people, etc. There are always consequences in place.



All special needs children are not violent, just like all typical children are docile.



Quoting jojo_star:

I am well aware of those, and I probably should have clarified, but I thought it was clear from the post: I'm talking about mental and emotional disabilities, not physical. That is something different. I know the ADA well. I don't know of any law that allows an adult to randomly lash out at people, or cause a loud disturbance, or throw things, or bite peoples legs (Happened in the elementary school in my district, an autistic child bit the teacher and drew blood). That is what I am talking about. Not deaf, blind, or paralyzed.

Quoting Anonymous:

"There aren't special laws in society, why should there be special laws in school?"





I take it that you are not familiar with the Americans With Disabilities Act. Yes, there are special accommodations for those with special needs in the adult world.








So, by your logic, children in wheelchairs should have to be able to go upstairs. Deaf children should be able to hear the intercom.





A child with autism can be the complete opposite of deaf child in that they hear the fire alarm extremely amplified. Of course, they would have to be taught what to do in case of an actual emergency, but why would they need to be subjected to torture (and yes that would be considered torture) in non-emergencies.








Quoting jojo_star:

Why? If the child gets special preference, especially in something like that, that puts the child, all the children, and the teachers, at a greater risk. If the child has never had a 'normal' drill, he/she won't know how to react. That will endanger the other children, because someone will need to make sure the SN child gets out and is safe, and that might be to the detriment of the other children. I stand by what I said. The same rules for all children. There aren't special laws in society, why should there be special laws in school? If they can't abide by the same rules as everyone else, they need to leave. 

Quoting Anonymous:

I would certainly hope that a school wouldn't allow bad behavior. However, they do need to accommodate special needs. An example would be to allow the child to exit the building before the fire alarm goes off when there is a fire drill.







Quoting jojo_star:

Exactly. And allowing special rules, allowing bad and disruptive behavior, is not going to get them there, not to mention it causes a disturbance for the other children. 

Quoting Anonymous:

They are put in public school to learn how to act. They just need the help to get there.









Quoting jojo_star:

I disagree with both. Special needs kids are either special and deserve special accommodations, which means NOT public school with all the other children, or they do deserve to be in public school to be integrated, but then, they have to play by the same rules as everyone else. You can't have it both ways. Either they are in public school, with regular kids, to adjust and learn how to live and act properly, or they are special children who deserve special consideration and circumstances, but then they don't have any business being with everyone else. 









Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 11, 2013 at 4:39 PM
1 mom liked this
I wouldn't say that referring to autism as a mental disorder is necessarily offensive. However, by calling it a mental disorder, it makes it so people don't understand the physical problems that go along with autism. Seizures, GI issues, low muscle tone, apraxia, poor fine motor skills, etc. are physical disabilities that can be part of autism.

It is usually considered either a neurological disorder or developmental disability.

Quoting Anonymous:

One anon says physical... one anon says neuro... Some say mental...

To me it doesn't really seem to make a difference either way... They are all connected and most disorders can fall into at least 2 catagories.

Do you find the term mental disorder offensive?  If so, why?



Quoting Anonymous:

It's a neurological disorder.



Quoting Anonymous:

Experts can't even agree as to how Autism should be classified.  Right now, it is actually classifed as a mental disorder.




Quoting Anonymous:

Autism is a physical disability, so that's not a good example given. Perhaps you should educate yourself on autism. I'm not sure exactly what you mean by mental and emotional disability.





The ADA describes a disability as "...a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity.". Perhaps you aren't as educated on the act as you thought.





Typical children without disabilies have been know to get violent in school too. Why single out special needs children? I don't know any school that would allow any child, special needs or not, to throw things and bite people, etc. There are always consequences in place.





All special needs children are not violent, just like all typical children are docile.





Quoting jojo_star:

I am well aware of those, and I probably should have clarified, but I thought it was clear from the post: I'm talking about mental and emotional disabilities, not physical. That is something different. I know the ADA well. I don't know of any law that allows an adult to randomly lash out at people, or cause a loud disturbance, or throw things, or bite peoples legs (Happened in the elementary school in my district, an autistic child bit the teacher and drew blood). That is what I am talking about. Not deaf, blind, or paralyzed.

Quoting Anonymous:

"There aren't special laws in society, why should there be special laws in school?"







I take it that you are not familiar with the Americans With Disabilities Act. Yes, there are special accommodations for those with special needs in the adult world.











So, by your logic, children in wheelchairs should have to be able to go upstairs. Deaf children should be able to hear the intercom.







A child with autism can be the complete opposite of deaf child in that they hear the fire alarm extremely amplified. Of course, they would have to be taught what to do in case of an actual emergency, but why would they need to be subjected to torture (and yes that would be considered torture) in non-emergencies.











Quoting jojo_star:

Why? If the child gets special preference, especially in something like that, that puts the child, all the children, and the teachers, at a greater risk. If the child has never had a 'normal' drill, he/she won't know how to react. That will endanger the other children, because someone will need to make sure the SN child gets out and is safe, and that might be to the detriment of the other children. I stand by what I said. The same rules for all children. There aren't special laws in society, why should there be special laws in school? If they can't abide by the same rules as everyone else, they need to leave. 

Quoting Anonymous:

I would certainly hope that a school wouldn't allow bad behavior. However, they do need to accommodate special needs. An example would be to allow the child to exit the building before the fire alarm goes off when there is a fire drill.









Quoting jojo_star:

Exactly. And allowing special rules, allowing bad and disruptive behavior, is not going to get them there, not to mention it causes a disturbance for the other children. 

Quoting Anonymous:

They are put in public school to learn how to act. They just need the help to get there.











Quoting jojo_star:

I disagree with both. Special needs kids are either special and deserve special accommodations, which means NOT public school with all the other children, or they do deserve to be in public school to be integrated, but then, they have to play by the same rules as everyone else. You can't have it both ways. Either they are in public school, with regular kids, to adjust and learn how to live and act properly, or they are special children who deserve special consideration and circumstances, but then they don't have any business being with everyone else. 











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