Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Bout to seriously beat some one (son with Vernal keratoconjunctivitis ) *RANT*** UPDATE

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

AFter a year of seeing a doc off and on with a bunch of different eye drops and NO diagnosis I finally asked friends to recommond another doc after my son woke up like THIS

 

 

Vernal keratoconjunctivitis is the diagnosis we got THANK GOD finally have some idea what we're dealing with. 

We got two meds and I told the doc straight up, the reason we couldn't get the first few meds from the other doc was that they are too expensive, the insurance screamed for a prior authorization, and the doc office told me "oh we don't do those they take too long."  Yes, because sending six different perscriptions takes a shorter time than filling out a little paperwork.  WHATEVER.

Anyway, THIS doc filled out the prior auth forms before we even left the doc office so I KNOW they were done.  I get to the pharmacy a half hour away and get told they don't have the right forms.  I say fine, what is the cost I will pay out of pocket because we really need them NOW.  I get told over $300 FOR TWO EYE DROPS.  I call the doc office, he was with a patient but his receptionist said she'd get right on it.  I left the pharmacy and had to give my son his previous eyedrops that aren't that effective but it's all Ihave.  poor guy is screaming and wants to claw his eyes out.

About an hour later the doctor himself calls me, says he took care of it, called the pharmacy himself and they told him they have the forms, and it should be ready.  Alright then, my mom was on the road so I called her to go to the pharmacy for me.  She comes back with "they said they didn't have anything yet for him."

I'm seriously about to just go APE SHIT.  the swelling was starting to get worse so I made him a cold compress like the doc said and gave him some benadryl just so he could get SOME relief and calm him down so he stops rubbing so much.  Right now he's kinda zoned out on the sofa and he isn't fussing about it anymore so that's good.

The pharmacy closes at 8.  I am calling at 7 to find out wtf is going on -- if they have anything yet.  I am going to get those drops TODAY even if some one has to lose a limb.

Okay, I feel better.

Well, not really. I will feel better once my son can freaking open his eyes without looking like some strung-out crack head.

 

****Wow I go to bed, come back and there's this many posts! 

Yes, this doc is AMAZING he got the insurance to pay up on both eyedrops!!!  This morning his eye is damn near swollen shut but the doc did say it might take a day or two for the steriod drops to work.

What this condition is, is a severe allergic reaction to anything that is more common in boys his age than girls, and it is something they normally grow out of in puberty.  Weirdest thing I ever heard, but that's what he said and when I googled it, got told the same thing.

Thanks for all the well wishes!

****** He says his eyes FEEL better but they don't LOOK better after a full day's course of both drops.  Here's praying tomorrow he looks better.

****this morning there is only a tiny bit of swelling and the redness is almost completely gone!  He felt good enough to go to his gma's today, my uncles are over there frying fish.  I am taking this opportunity to catch up on homework and have a little bit quiet time.

Posted by Anonymous on May. 10, 2013 at 6:59 PM
Replies (161-170):
amandaxshawn08
by on May. 11, 2013 at 8:36 PM
Poor kid. Hope the new drops help!!!
Basherte
by Gold Member on May. 11, 2013 at 9:45 PM

I'm so glad that you finally got a diagnosis. 

I hope he feels better soon. 

What a wonderful Mom! 


CafeMom Tickers
Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 11, 2013 at 10:31 PM

 


Quoting Anonymous:

Sweetie, you need to look up the definition of the word disease and get the hell off google. Anyone that has allergies, seasonal or otherwise has a "disease", it's a catch all term. You are looking up the worst case scenarios. I get this all the time, activating, but it's JUST an allergic reaction. And guess what... I use breastmilk on my eye when it happens!! Releases the symptoms better and quicker then anything I've ever been prescribed. ;)

Quoting Anonymous:

 


 


Quoting kailu1835:

this is not a disease its an allergic reaction.


Quoting Anonymous:


 



 



Quoting kailu1835:

Only because you are willfully ignorant. Don't take my word for it, look it up.



Quoting Anonymous:



 




 




Quoting kailu1835:

Ignorant and uneducated much?




Quoting Anonymous:




 





 





Quoting kailu1835:

You TOTALLY beat me to it lol





Quoting svolkov:

Breastmilk. Free and works better than any drop imo! Sorry u r going thru so much crap :( I hate medical bs




Stupid is as stupid does.





 




Look in the mirror girl, look in the mirror. You're making a complete fool of yourself.




 



The only woefully ignorant one here is yourself. Breastmilk has it's place, it is not however a cure-all. Anyone who thinks breast milk will cure an eye disease that can lead to blindness is beyond ignorant, as well as a danger to mothers who'll actually take your breastmilk advice & not give their child the meds they need.



 



 


Oh for christs sake. It is not just an allergy. WTF are you about anyway?  You seem to be going out of your way to let the OP think her kid has a simple allergy,  that it's no big deal, just dab a little breast milk in his eyes, and he'll be A - okay.  Jesus, with a "friend" like you, who needs enemies?


Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is an allergic eye diseasethat especially affects young boys. The most common symptoms are itching, photophobia, burning, and tearing. The most common signs are giant papillae, superficial keratitis, and conjunctival hyperaemia.


Patients with VKC frequently have a family or medical history of atopic diseases, such as asthma, rhinitis, and eczema. However, VKC is not associated with a positive skin test or RAST in 42-47% of patients, confirming that it is not solely an IgE-mediated disease. On the basis of challenge studies as well as immunohistochemical and mediator studies, a Th2-driven mechanism with the involvement of mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes has been suggested. Th2 lymphocytes are responsible for both hyperproduction of IgE (interleukin 4, IL-4) and for differentiation and activation of mast cells (IL-3) and eosinophils (IL-5). Other studies have demonstrated the involvement of neural factors such as substance P and NGF in the pathogenesis of VKC, and the overexpression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors in the conjunctiva of VKC patients has introduced the possible involvement of sex hormones. Thus, the pathogenesis of VKC is probably multifactorial, with the interaction of the immune, nervous, and endocrine systems.


The clinical management of VKC requires a swift diagnosis, correct therapy, and evaluation of the prognosis.The diagnosis is generally based on the signs and symptoms of the disease, but in difficult cases can be aided by conjunctival scraping, demonstrating the presence of infiltrating eosinophils. Therapeutic options are many, in most cases topical, and should be chosen on the basis of the severity of the disease. The most effective drugs, steroids, should however be carefully administered, and only for brief periods, to avoid secondary development of glaucoma.


A 2% solution of cyclosporine in olive oil or in castor oil should be considered as an alternative. The long-term prognosis of patients is generally good; however 6% of patients develop corneal damage, cataract, or glaucoma.


 




Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a bilateral, chronic, external ocular inflammatory disease of unknown cause. It is a fairly common disease in hot, dry environments, representing as much as 3% of severe ophthalmic diseases and up to 33% of all eye pathology seen among young patients in eye clinics in Central Africa. Symptoms and signs can persist for years with an important visual morbidity and social impact. Corneal changes (e.g. corneal ulcers) can be sight threatening, occurring in up to 10% of VKC children. Topical steroid therapy remains the current standard treatment, but in developing countries its use often is chronic and not medically supervised, potentially leading to bacterial infections, steroid-induced glaucoma and cataract. Chromoglycate drops have less side effects but lack the power to control a flare-up. Topical cyclosporine has the potential to offer an efficient but safer alternative to steroid drops in the management of VKC in an African setting. Its safety and efficiency in the management of vernal keratoconjunctivitis have been described in several uncontrolled studies and double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, but those studies were relatively small and involved populations outside Africa with predominantly palpebral and mixed forms of VKC. Controversy still remains on the efficiency of cyclosporine in severe forms of allergic conjunctivitis like VKC. We therefore undertake a larger prospective randomized double-masked, standard treatment controlled clinical trial in Central Africa to compare the short-term efficiency of cyclosporine A (CsA) 2% eye drops, solved in olive oil vehicle, with that of steroid drops in predominantly limbal forms of VKC. During 4 weeks the participants will be randomised to either cyclosporine or dexamethasone as attack treatment for VKC. The 4 weeks thereafter all participants will receive chromoglycate drops as maintenance treatment. Additional objectives are to document any difference in rebound phenomenon while on chromoglycate during the maintenance phase between the 2 treatment groups and to evaluate safety and tolerance of the test medication.





 

"'Sweetie" you need to look up the definition of eye disease and get the hell of CM with your complete ignorance about children's eye diseases, & eye diseases in general. Three years ago I went from being able to see perfectly fine, to not being able to see very well thanks to an eye disease. My vision problem will never get better thanks to my eye disease.   I know a hell of a lot more about eye diseases now than I did in the past & I also know when something goes wrong with your eyes, or your childrens eyes, you don't be a stupid idiot like you, and brush it off as nothing more than a seasonal allergy.

 

Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 11, 2013 at 10:39 PM


smh, i was wondering if you ladies wouldve found a way to turn this post into a argument as well.. yall are so catty its not even funny!! geez.. 

OP so sorry about what you and your son and husband are going through,b:( i have SEVERE allergys as well and am now looking to find a allergist who can give me the once amonth shots.. smh the eye itching is the worst part of it too.

Quoting Anonymous:


seeing as she didn't say anything about a younger kid, I'm not going to assume there is one.  I'm also not going to assume she breastfed in the first place.  All we know is she has a kid with sick eyes

Quoting MilkLover0203:

Yeah, cause nobody ever has a second child or some frozen breast milk stored.

Quoting Anonymous:


what makes you think she's lactating?  that kid's like 5-6


Quoting svolkov:

Breastmilk. Free and works better than any drop imo! Sorry u r going thru so much crap :( I hate medical bs








Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 11, 2013 at 10:43 PM


Oh My Goodness! geez OP sorry about whats going on , and the fact that these idiots below stil some how found a way to start a drama fest on your post... smh this isnt about you and what your going through with your eyes or about you who is trying to preach a breastfeeding rally in this thread, gosh 

Quoting Anonymous:



Quoting Anonymous:

Sweetie, you need to look up the definition of the word disease and get the hell off google. Anyone that has allergies, seasonal or otherwise has a "disease", it's a catch all term. You are looking up the worst case scenarios. I get this all the time, activating, but it's JUST an allergic reaction. And guess what... I use breastmilk on my eye when it happens!! Releases the symptoms better and quicker then anything I've ever been prescribed. ;)

Quoting Anonymous:





Quoting kailu1835:

this is not a disease its an allergic reaction.


Quoting Anonymous:








Quoting kailu1835:

Only because you are willfully ignorant. Don't take my word for it, look it up.



Quoting Anonymous:











Quoting kailu1835:

Ignorant and uneducated much?




Quoting Anonymous:














Quoting kailu1835:

You TOTALLY beat me to it lol





Quoting svolkov:

Breastmilk. Free and works better than any drop imo! Sorry u r going thru so much crap :( I hate medical bs




Stupid is as stupid does.









Look in the mirror girl, look in the mirror. You're making a complete fool of yourself.







The only woefully ignorant one here is yourself. Breastmilk has it's place, it is not however a cure-all. Anyone who thinks breast milk will cure an eye disease that can lead to blindness is beyond ignorant, as well as a danger to mothers who'll actually take your breastmilk advice & not give their child the meds they need.








Oh for christs sake. It is not just an allergy. WTF are you about anyway?  You seem to be going out of your way to let the OP think her kid has a simple allergy,  that it's no big deal, just dab a little breast milk in his eyes, and he'll be A - okay.  Jesus, with a "friend" like you, who needs enemies?


Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is an allergic eye diseasethat especially affects young boys. The most common symptoms are itching, photophobia, burning, and tearing. The most common signs are giant papillae, superficial keratitis, and conjunctival hyperaemia.


Patients with VKC frequently have a family or medical history of atopic diseases, such as asthma, rhinitis, and eczema. However, VKC is not associated with a positive skin test or RAST in 42-47% of patients, confirming that it is not solely an IgE-mediated disease. On the basis of challenge studies as well as immunohistochemical and mediator studies, a Th2-driven mechanism with the involvement of mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes has been suggested. Th2 lymphocytes are responsible for both hyperproduction of IgE (interleukin 4, IL-4) and for differentiation and activation of mast cells (IL-3) and eosinophils (IL-5). Other studies have demonstrated the involvement of neural factors such as substance P and NGF in the pathogenesis of VKC, and the overexpression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors in the conjunctiva of VKC patients has introduced the possible involvement of sex hormones. Thus, the pathogenesis of VKC is probably multifactorial, with the interaction of the immune, nervous, and endocrine systems.


The clinical management of VKC requires a swift diagnosis, correct therapy, and evaluation of the prognosis.The diagnosis is generally based on the signs and symptoms of the disease, but in difficult cases can be aided by conjunctival scraping, demonstrating the presence of infiltrating eosinophils. Therapeutic options are many, in most cases topical, and should be chosen on the basis of the severity of the disease. The most effective drugs, steroids, should however be carefully administered, and only for brief periods, to avoid secondary development of glaucoma.


A 2% solution of cyclosporine in olive oil or in castor oil should be considered as an alternative. The long-term prognosis of patients is generally good; however 6% of patients develop corneal damage, cataract, or glaucoma.


 




Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a bilateral, chronic, external ocular inflammatory disease of unknown cause. It is a fairly common disease in hot, dry environments, representing as much as 3% of severe ophthalmic diseases and up to 33% of all eye pathology seen among young patients in eye clinics in Central Africa. Symptoms and signs can persist for years with an important visual morbidity and social impact. Corneal changes (e.g. corneal ulcers) can be sight threatening, occurring in up to 10% of VKC children. Topical steroid therapy remains the current standard treatment, but in developing countries its use often is chronic and not medically supervised, potentially leading to bacterial infections, steroid-induced glaucoma and cataract. Chromoglycate drops have less side effects but lack the power to control a flare-up. Topical cyclosporine has the potential to offer an efficient but safer alternative to steroid drops in the management of VKC in an African setting. Its safety and efficiency in the management of vernal keratoconjunctivitis have been described in several uncontrolled studies and double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, but those studies were relatively small and involved populations outside Africa with predominantly palpebral and mixed forms of VKC. Controversy still remains on the efficiency of cyclosporine in severe forms of allergic conjunctivitis like VKC. We therefore undertake a larger prospective randomized double-masked, standard treatment controlled clinical trial in Central Africa to compare the short-term efficiency of cyclosporine A (CsA) 2% eye drops, solved in olive oil vehicle, with that of steroid drops in predominantly limbal forms of VKC. During 4 weeks the participants will be randomised to either cyclosporine or dexamethasone as attack treatment for VKC. The 4 weeks thereafter all participants will receive chromoglycate drops as maintenance treatment. Additional objectives are to document any difference in rebound phenomenon while on chromoglycate during the maintenance phase between the 2 treatment groups and to evaluate safety and tolerance of the test medication.






"'Sweetie" you need to look up the definition of eye disease and get the hell of CM with your complete ignorance about children's eye diseases, & eye diseases in general. Three years ago I went from being able to see perfectly fine, to not being able to see very well thanks to an eye disease. My vision problem will never get better thanks to my eye disease.   I know a hell of a lot more about eye diseases now than I did in the past & I also know when something goes wrong with your eyes, or your childrens eyes, you don't be a stupid idiot like you, and brush it off as nothing more than a seasonal allergy.




conweis
by Platinum Member on May. 11, 2013 at 11:05 PM
Good to know he feels better
Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 11, 2013 at 11:10 PM

 


Quoting Anonymous:

 

Oh My Goodness! geez OP sorry about whats going on , and the fact that these idiots below stil some how found a way to start a drama fest on your post... smh this isnt about you and what your going through with your eyes or about you who is trying to preach a breastfeeding rally in this thread, gosh 

Quoting Anonymous:

 

 

Quoting Anonymous:

Sweetie, you need to look up the definition of the word disease and get the hell off google. Anyone that has allergies, seasonal or otherwise has a "disease", it's a catch all term. You are looking up the worst case scenarios. I get this all the time, activating, but it's JUST an allergic reaction. And guess what... I use breastmilk on my eye when it happens!! Releases the symptoms better and quicker then anything I've ever been prescribed. ;)

Quoting Anonymous:

 


 


Quoting kailu1835:

this is not a disease its an allergic reaction.


Quoting Anonymous:


 



 



Quoting kailu1835:

Only because you are willfully ignorant. Don't take my word for it, look it up.



Quoting Anonymous:



 




 




Quoting kailu1835:

Ignorant and uneducated much?




Quoting Anonymous:




 





 





Quoting kailu1835:

You TOTALLY beat me to it lol





Quoting svolkov:

Breastmilk. Free and works better than any drop imo! Sorry u r going thru so much crap :( I hate medical bs




Stupid is as stupid does.





 




Look in the mirror girl, look in the mirror. You're making a complete fool of yourself.




 



The only woefully ignorant one here is yourself. Breastmilk has it's place, it is not however a cure-all. Anyone who thinks breast milk will cure an eye disease that can lead to blindness is beyond ignorant, as well as a danger to mothers who'll actually take your breastmilk advice & not give their child the meds they need.



 



 


Oh for christs sake. It is not just an allergy. WTF are you about anyway?  You seem to be going out of your way to let the OP think her kid has a simple allergy,  that it's no big deal, just dab a little breast milk in his eyes, and he'll be A - okay.  Jesus, with a "friend" like you, who needs enemies?


Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is an allergic eye diseasethat especially affects young boys. The most common symptoms are itching, photophobia, burning, and tearing. The most common signs are giant papillae, superficial keratitis, and conjunctival hyperaemia.


Patients with VKC frequently have a family or medical history of atopic diseases, such as asthma, rhinitis, and eczema. However, VKC is not associated with a positive skin test or RAST in 42-47% of patients, confirming that it is not solely an IgE-mediated disease. On the basis of challenge studies as well as immunohistochemical and mediator studies, a Th2-driven mechanism with the involvement of mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes has been suggested. Th2 lymphocytes are responsible for both hyperproduction of IgE (interleukin 4, IL-4) and for differentiation and activation of mast cells (IL-3) and eosinophils (IL-5). Other studies have demonstrated the involvement of neural factors such as substance P and NGF in the pathogenesis of VKC, and the overexpression of oestrogen and progesterone receptors in the conjunctiva of VKC patients has introduced the possible involvement of sex hormones. Thus, the pathogenesis of VKC is probably multifactorial, with the interaction of the immune, nervous, and endocrine systems.


The clinical management of VKC requires a swift diagnosis, correct therapy, and evaluation of the prognosis.The diagnosis is generally based on the signs and symptoms of the disease, but in difficult cases can be aided by conjunctival scraping, demonstrating the presence of infiltrating eosinophils. Therapeutic options are many, in most cases topical, and should be chosen on the basis of the severity of the disease. The most effective drugs, steroids, should however be carefully administered, and only for brief periods, to avoid secondary development of glaucoma.


A 2% solution of cyclosporine in olive oil or in castor oil should be considered as an alternative. The long-term prognosis of patients is generally good; however 6% of patients develop corneal damage, cataract, or glaucoma.


 




Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a bilateral, chronic, external ocular inflammatory disease of unknown cause. It is a fairly common disease in hot, dry environments, representing as much as 3% of severe ophthalmic diseases and up to 33% of all eye pathology seen among young patients in eye clinics in Central Africa. Symptoms and signs can persist for years with an important visual morbidity and social impact. Corneal changes (e.g. corneal ulcers) can be sight threatening, occurring in up to 10% of VKC children. Topical steroid therapy remains the current standard treatment, but in developing countries its use often is chronic and not medically supervised, potentially leading to bacterial infections, steroid-induced glaucoma and cataract. Chromoglycate drops have less side effects but lack the power to control a flare-up. Topical cyclosporine has the potential to offer an efficient but safer alternative to steroid drops in the management of VKC in an African setting. Its safety and efficiency in the management of vernal keratoconjunctivitis have been described in several uncontrolled studies and double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, but those studies were relatively small and involved populations outside Africa with predominantly palpebral and mixed forms of VKC. Controversy still remains on the efficiency of cyclosporine in severe forms of allergic conjunctivitis like VKC. We therefore undertake a larger prospective randomized double-masked, standard treatment controlled clinical trial in Central Africa to compare the short-term efficiency of cyclosporine A (CsA) 2% eye drops, solved in olive oil vehicle, with that of steroid drops in predominantly limbal forms of VKC. During 4 weeks the participants will be randomised to either cyclosporine or dexamethasone as attack treatment for VKC. The 4 weeks thereafter all participants will receive chromoglycate drops as maintenance treatment. Additional objectives are to document any difference in rebound phenomenon while on chromoglycate during the maintenance phase between the 2 treatment groups and to evaluate safety and tolerance of the test medication.





 

"'Sweetie" you need to look up the definition of eye disease and get the hell of CM with your complete ignorance about children's eye diseases, & eye diseases in general. Three years ago I went from being able to see perfectly fine, to not being able to see very well thanks to an eye disease. My vision problem will never get better thanks to my eye disease.   I know a hell of a lot more about eye diseases now than I did in the past & I also know when something goes wrong with your eyes, or your childrens eyes, you don't be a stupid idiot like you, and brush it off as nothing more than a seasonal allergy.

 

 

 

Dictionary. A book that teaches how to spell and understand the meaning of words. You need one badly.

 

Gynx6188
by on May. 11, 2013 at 11:46 PM
I actually have something very similar but to a much less degree. Basically i have conjunctivitis plus chronic dry eye. So im on eye drops rastasis, that are expensive as HELL but luckily my eye doc is awesome and hooked me up with discounts etc. I hope the drops work for your boy and his eyes get better. No fun at all.
ndawnz
by Member on May. 12, 2013 at 4:44 AM

I hope your angel is doing lots better mom!

AmosFarkle
by on May. 12, 2013 at 6:51 AM

Hoping you and yours finally have the answer.  If this is your ped, you need to see an opthamologist.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)



Featured