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Bill Gates and Gov to take over Public Schools

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
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National Governors Association and State Education Chiefs Launch Common State Academic Standards

Suwanee, GA – Today, the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) released a set of state-led education standards, the Common Core State Standards, at Peachtree Ridge High School in Suwanee, GA. The English-language arts and mathematics standards for grades K-12 were developed in collaboration with a variety of stakeholders including content experts, states, teachers, school administrators and parents. The standards establish clear and consistent goals for learning that will prepare America’s children for success in college and work.  

Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue, Delaware Gov. Jack Markell, West Virginia State Superintendent of Schools Steve Paine, Florida Commissioner of Education Dr. Eric J. Smith, American Federation of Teachers (AFT) President Randi Weingarten, CEO of Baltimore City Public Schools Andres Alonso, and Vice President of the National Education Association (NEA) Lily Eskelsen have come out in support of the standards. 

 The event featured a panel discussion moderated by President of Alliance for Excellent Education and former West Virginia Gov. Bob Wise. Panelists were:

  •    Byron V. Garrett, CEO, National Parent Teacher Association (PTA);
  •    Michael Wotorson, Executive Director, Campaign for High School Equity;
  •    Steve Rohleder, Group Chief Executive, Health & Public Service Operating Group, Accenture;
  •    William Bradley Bryant, Member, Georgia State Board of Education; and
  •    Leah Luke, Wisconsin 2010 Teacher of the Year.


The release of the standards marks the conclusion of the development of the Common Core State Standards and signals the start of the adoption and implementation process by the states.  The year-long process was led by governors and chief state school officers in 48 states, 2 territories and the District of Columbia. The final standards were informed by nearly 10,000 public comments and by standards in other top performing countries so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global economy.

“American competitiveness relies on an education system that can adequately prepare our youth for college and the workforce,” commented Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue. “When American students have the skills and knowledge needed in today’s jobs, our communities will be positioned to compete successfully in the global economy.”

“Strong schools are the surest path to our nation’s long-term economic success. America’s students are now competing with children around the globe for jobs and opportunities after graduation. We need to maintain a national focus to ensure our kids are ready to compete and ready to win. That’s why our nation’s governors committed to this effort to create a common set of high expectations for students across the country.  The Common Core State Standards reflect what can come from cooperation to improve student achievement,” said Delaware Gov. Jack Markell, who joined via satellite from Delaware.

“The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents have a roadmap for what they need to do to help them. Further, these standards provide appropriate benchmarks for all students, regardless of where they live, and allow states to more effectively help all students to succeed,” commented Steve Paine, West Virginia State Superintendent of Schools. “I am excited to have a common framework from which to share best practices with fellow superintendents across the nation. With students, parents, and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed and build a strong future for themselves and the country.” 

“Our best understanding of what works in our schools comes from the teachers who teach in our classrooms every day. That is why these standards establish what students need to learn, but do not dictate how teachers should teach. Instead, the standards enable schools and teachers to decide how best to help students reach the standards,” said Florida Commissioner of Education Dr. Eric J. Smith. “We are entering the most critical phase of the movement for Common Core State Standards. It is now up to states to adopt the standards and carry on the hard work of the educators and community leaders that worked to develop them.”

These standards define the knowledge and skills students should have within their K-12 education careers so that they will graduate high school fully prepared for college and careers. The standards are:

  •    Aligned with college and work expectations;
  •    Clear, understandable and consistent;
  •    Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order skills;
  •    Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards;
  •    Informed by other top performing countries, so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global economy and society; and
  •    Evidence- and research-based.


In the coming months, each state will follow its own procedures and processes for adoption of the Common Core State Standards. The NGA Center and CCSSO recognize that meaningful and effective implementation of the Common Core State Standards is critical to achieving these goals. To that end, the two organizations are continuing to work closely with a range of partners on how to best support states and districts as they move from adoption to implementation. 



To learn more about the Common Core State Standards, please visit corestandards.org.

Posted by Anonymous on May. 15, 2013 at 6:46 AM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 15, 2013 at 6:49 AM

Gates gives $150 million in grants for Common Core Standards

cashFor an initiative billed as being publicly driven, the Common Core States Initiativehas benefited enormously from the generosity of the private philanthropy of Bill and Melinda Gates. How much? About $150 million worth.

Take a look at this list of grants, obtained from their foundation’s Web site. Note not only the amounts but the wide range of organizations receiving money. Universities. Unions. State education departments. Nonprofits. Think tanks. The grants were given for a range of reasons, including developing materials aligned to the standards and building support for the standards.

You can see how invested the Gates Foundation is in the success of the Common Core. What kind of Core support do these grants buy from the organizations that receive them?

If you want to see what each grant is for, click here and you can access each grant description.  At the bottom of the list are a few descriptions of specific grants.

WestEd2013College-ReadyUS Program$30,000
LearnZillion, Inc.2013College-ReadyUS Program$965,525
University of Kentucky Research Foundation2013College-ReadyUS Program$1,000,000
Delaware Department of Education2013College-ReadyUS Program$400,000
National Paideia Center Inc2013College-ReadyUS Program$659,788
The Aspen Institute Inc2013College-ReadyUS Program$3,615,655
The Achievement Network2012College-ReadyUS Program$3,002,252
Kentucky Department of Education2012College-ReadyUS Program$1,903,089
Colorado Legacy Foundation2012College-ReadyUS Program$1,748,337
Fund for Public Schools Inc2012College-ReadyUS Program$1,815,810
Council of Chief State School Officers2012College-ReadyUS Program$475,000
BetterLesson, Inc.2012College-ReadyUS Program$3,527,240
The NEA Foundation for the Improvement of Education2012College-ReadyUS Program$99,997
JUMP Math2012College-ReadyUS Program$698,587
Center for Curriculum Redesign Inc.2012College-ReadyUS Program$198,000
Pennsylvania Business Roundtable Educational Foundation2012College-ReadyUS Program$257,391
American Federation Of Teachers Educational Foundation2012College-ReadyUS Program$4,400,000
University of Arizona2012College-ReadyUS Program$3,416,901
American Enterprise Institute For Public Policy Research2012Global Policy & AdvocacyUS Program$1,068,788
State Education Technology2012College-ReadyUS Program$500,000
Student Achievement Partners Inc2012College-ReadyUS Program$4,042,920
Baton Rouge Area Foundation2012College-ReadyUS Program$500,000
National Governors Association Center For Best Practices2012Strategic PartnershipsUS Program$37,674
University of Michigan2012College-ReadyUS Program$1,999,999
The College-Ready Promise2011College-ReadyUS Program$300,000
Massachusetts Institute of Technology2011College-ReadyUS Program$2,889,132
Scholastic Inc.2011College-ReadyUS Program$4,463,541
New Venture Fund2011Global Policy & AdvocacyUS Program$378,000
Learning Forward2011College-ReadyUS Program$999,795
The University of the State of New York2011College-ReadyUS Program$600,000
Nellie Mae Education Foundation, Inc.2011College-ReadyUS Program$350,000
Americas Promise-The Alliance For Youth2011College-ReadyUS Program$500,000
Hillsborough County Council of PTA/PTSAs2011College-ReadyUS Program$25,000
Military Child Education Coalition2011Global Policy & AdvocacyUS Program$149,965
Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, Inc.2011Postsecondary SuccessUS Program$4,618,652
Council of State Governments2011College-ReadyUS Program$369,623
Khan Academy Inc.2011College-ReadyUS Program$4,079,361
National Writing Project2011College-ReadyUS Program$3,095,593
National Indian Education Association2011Strategic PartnershipsUS Program$500,000
Council Of The Great City Schools2011College-ReadyUS Program$4,910,988
Council of Chief State School Officers2011College-ReadyUS Program$9,388,911
Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence2011College-ReadyUS Program$198,206
Creative Commons Corporation2011College-ReadyUS Program$812,955
Louisiana Department of Education2011College-ReadyUS Program$7,351,708
Colorado Legacy Foundation2011College-ReadyUS Program$9,707,210
Kentucky Department of Education2011College-ReadyUS Program$9,125,277
American Federation Of Teachers Educational Foundation2011College-ReadyUS Program$1,000,000
Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction2011Community GrantsUS Program$75,000
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development2011College-ReadyUS Program$3,024,695
National Association of State Boards of Education2011College-ReadyUS Program$1,077,960
National Governors Association Center For Best Practices2011College-ReadyUS Program$1,598,477
Reasoning Mind, Inc.2011College-ReadyUS Program$742,996
MetaMetrics, Inc.2010College-ReadyUS Program$3,468,005
New Visions for Public Schools, Inc2010College-ReadyUS Program$8,149,935
Pennsylvania Department of Education2010College-ReadyUS Program$526,960
The University of the State of New York2010College-ReadyUS Program$892,500
Kentucky Department of Education2010College-ReadyUS Program$1,000,000
Georgia Department of Education2010College-ReadyUS Program$1,980,892
Center for Teaching Quality, Inc.2010College-ReadyUS Program$395,836
Alliance for Excellent Education, Inc.2010College-ReadyUS Program$3,200,004
Education Commission of the States2010College-ReadyUS Program$799,221
Albuquerque Public Schools2010College-ReadyUS Program$500,000
Khan Academy Inc.2010College-ReadyUS Program$1,464,667
School District of Philadelphia2010College-ReadyUS Program$500,000
Cleveland Metropolitan School District2010College-ReadyUS Program$497,752
Cristo Rey Network2010College-ReadyUS Program$556,006
Research for Action Inc2010College-ReadyUS Program$1,309,409
Purdue University2010College-ReadyUS Program$1,453,832
Massachusetts Business Alliance for Education, Inc.2010College-ReadyUS Program$151,431
Forsyth County Schools2010College-ReadyUS Program$151,200
New York University2010College-ReadyUS Program$40,282
Council Of The Great City Schools2010College-ReadyUS Program$100,000
Council of State Governments2010College-ReadyUS Program$399,953
Common Core Inc.2009 and earlierCollege-ReadyUS Program$550,844
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc.2009 and earlierCollege-ReadyUS Program$5,549,352
Alliance for Excellent Education, Inc.2009 and earlierCollege-ReadyUS Program$551,336
National Association of State Boards of Education2009 and earlierCollege-ReadyUS Program$450,675
Thomas B. Fordham Institute2009 and earlierCollege-ReadyUS Program$959,116
The Education Trust2009 and earlierCollege-ReadyUS Program$2,039,526
Military Child Education Coalition2009 and earlierGlobal Policy & AdvocacyUS Program$269,998
Cmgmqmmom
by Sass Queen on May. 15, 2013 at 6:51 AM
Where was Bill Gates mentioned in this article? Also, common core had been in place in lots of places. Not sure what the issue is.
I see you added the Bill Gates info..I think it's great that he is donating money for education.
zianneaaliyah
by 4ever LMFAO on May. 15, 2013 at 7:03 AM

LMAO! The government always ran public schools. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous on May. 15, 2013 at 7:03 AM

common core is just another thing that teachers/parents hate(and every state has it now)Many frustrated teachers/kids and parents with this

Mom2_Jimmy_Anka
by Samantha on May. 15, 2013 at 7:08 AM

There should be a common curriculum among states. It is ridiculous that a child can move from one state to another and be way ahead or behind depending on where they move.

anotherguatmom
by Member on May. 15, 2013 at 7:11 AM

It's not that big of a deal.  It's already been implemented here in Louisville.  My son is at a very competitive school and I've seen no difference in his circulium this year.  Yes, for the lower performing schools things are going o get more challenging.  But, until parents are held responsible things won't change.  It takes more than a teacher for a kid to get the most out of what they are offered.  If the parents aren't participating in the child's education and life it's a dead end no matter what they do.  

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 15, 2013 at 7:15 AM

until parents are held responsible for what?  Here in my town, the misappropriation of taxes is what is causing our schools to fail...cutting out music sports and physical education is tops on their list this month.   I think it's more like, until our town officials can pull their heads ouuta their ass and stop padding each others wallets, THEN maybe our schools could thrive a little better...my kids high school is using books that are 30yrs old. 


Quoting anotherguatmom:

It's not that big of a deal.  It's already been implemented here in Louisville.  My son is at a very competitive school and I've seen no difference in his circulium this year.  Yes, for the lower performing schools things are going o get more challenging.  But, until parents are held responsible things won't change.  It takes more than a teacher for a kid to get the most out of what they are offered.  If the parents aren't participating in the child's education and life it's a dead end no matter what they do.  



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