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Parents with kids who have autism. Also I have a question, what would you do about THIS school (parents of non autistic children are welcome too)

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
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Now obviously having kids with autism means we know that no two kids are exactly alike.

But what is your child like?

Like. Dislikes.

How high of low functioning is your child?

Do they get on kicks? (Like being on a my little pony kick for a few weeks and want to watch if non stop)

How old are they?

What type if school do they attend?

Do they have to take any medication?

I am raising my brother.
My mother passed away a year and a half ago and left me custody of my brother who was 11 at the timer and is 12 now.

He is severely autistic.

He is on medications. Prozac, serouquil and another one that I can't spell so ill dig the bottle out later and add it.

He still takes a nap every day after lunch at the same time that my 14 month old does. If he doesn't take a nap then he gets very grumpy and agitated just like she would.

He needs help bathing. Brushing his teeth and getting food.

He can get his own drinks. He uses the bathroom without any help. And can dress his self. He likes when he gets to pick his own clothes so I let him do that twice a week. Even if I means taking him to the store in his his scooby doo shirt, yellow shorts, beanie, and Greatest American Hero cape (that is literally what he wanted to wear to go do errands yesterday).

He's great with almost all forms of technology. He loves video games. Navigates YouTube. Can work my tablet better than I can.

He loves to draw. He will sit and draw for hours. If he does one little thing he doesn't like then he will toss the paper and start over.

My walls are frequently covered with papers. When he makes a drawing he really likes he will as for a sticker so he can hang it. Currently I have 5 UFOs above my couch. And several smiley faces across from my toilet.

He is not very verbal but will talk some. But a majority of his talking is in references from books, video games and movies. So you have to kind of decode what he is saying. Although he will tell you certain things plainly. Like if he's hungry, wants to each something, needs help finding something, or if he wants to go somewhere.

He is an escape artist. We have double aides dead bolts which were approved by CPS and the fire department. Window locks. Window alarms.

Knives and scissors (except his safety scissors. You know the ones that cut in zig zags) have to be kept in the highest cabinet that only my husband can reach.

When we go out he does have to wear a Harness with a "leash" that was made specifically for him. He is very quick. And strong. Fr some reason people see using a harness as a parent being lazy, but in all actuality it is to ensure his safety. I'm considering using one for dd too...she wants to walk every where and I don't want her running off...


He and dd get along great. They play together. Hold hands. Watch tv shows together. Color together. When he plays video games he will even hand her the fake controller.

He know his ABCs. And can count to 50 before he needs help.

He is starting to understand adding and subtracting.

I do flask cards with him for math and words.

He can write.

He can read. The school does not believe me. And he won't do it out loud. But he takes books off my shelves, books with no pictures, Will sit and flip through it. And then will speak in references from the book.

His current kick is Rollie pollie Ollie: the great defender of fun, he basically just wants to watch it on repeat and draws pictures of the characters.

He likes to rock. He will rock on the couch with a blanket over his head. That use to be a constant thing. But after he started playing video games and drawing now he only does it when he's tired or is listening to music.<

His favorite foods are pizza, home fries and spaghettie. It's hard to get him to eat veggies so I hide them in his favorite foods.


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He sees a behavioral specialists every 3 to 6 months depending on if he has switched meds.

He attends school for 2 hour a day.

It's summer now and I am considering finding him a new school. It seems to me like this school only has him coloring and not doing anything else. They don't want to listen to me. I've warned them of things that will trigger a meltdown and they just don't seem to care. I found out the reason he was rotting off the bus so upset each day is because the bus driver points at McDonalds on the way home to let him no he's almost there.

I've told her and the school that's pointing out a McDonald's when you aren't going there will cause a meltdown.

When it started I specifically asked her if he had been noticing the new McDonald on the way home and she said no. She the told the special education co op that that was the reason why and that she POINTS IT OUT.





They say he does work in class with writing, letters and numbers. But the only things he's brought home is his free time drawing. His progress report says he's doing well, but I've never seen ANY of the work they claim he is doing.

I feel like this school is just coloring time and isn't providing anything educational. I found out that if he gets upset they'll let him watch tv instead of working. Wtf? For awhile watching PBS took up a half hour of schooldays every day. But, it's the only school here. We couldn't move during the school year. Now we are looking for a new home in the next town over where there will be plenty of options for his schooling. What would you do in this situation with a school? Honestly if that's all they're doing I don't think they should e teaching at all, especially not special needs children..
Posted by Anonymous on May. 29, 2013 at 3:34 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 29, 2013 at 3:35 PM
Sorry for any typos. I suck when it comes to touch screens.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on May. 29, 2013 at 3:39 PM
Both my children are not autistic but my son who is
3 , when he was little used to watch bubble guppies all the time, would drive me nuts!! He would switch it up , sometimes, but he liked watching guppies. At that time though, he really didn't know other shows. And he is a pain to eat veggies , sigh*
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 29, 2013 at 3:49 PM
My dd isn't picky at all. She will eat anything and everything .

My brother on the other hand is extremely picky. Most of it has to do with texture though.


Quoting Anonymous:

Both my children are not autistic but my son who is

3 , when he was little used to watch bubble guppies all the time, would drive me nuts!! He would switch it up , sometimes, but he liked watching guppies. At that time though, he really didn't know other shows. And he is a pain to eat veggies , sigh*

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 29, 2013 at 3:59 PM
Oh and to add, he does have meltdown in which he will try to hurt himself. He won't run at anyone or try to hurt anyone other than himself. His one week meltdown free.
quickbooksworm
by Ruby Member on May. 29, 2013 at 9:37 PM
When I need to see what's going on in the classroom, I drop in at school and creep outside the door. Does he have an IEP? I'd flat out ask to see some work he has done.

I grew up with a low functioning autistic cousin. She went to a school outside of Atlanta for autistic children until she aged out. They did a LOT of facilitated communication in the 90's and it curbed her meltdowns. The schools stopped usingusing it at one point because of the controversy. I've heard a lot of non verbal autistic kids will use their tablets to communicate.
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 29, 2013 at 9:44 PM
See I can't just drop in. I would have to take a bus. And his hours are odd, so it would be hard to use the buss here that only has 3 pick up times. I've demanded to see some work several times. They'll send a paper or two home and that's it.

We are fine with moving though. In the next town over we will have across to some great resources for him. As well as great resources for dd. she doesn't get to be around a lot of other kids. In the next town over there is "play school". Like head start for babies and young toddlers. It can be used as a daycare or you can just take your kids or even stay with them. She will finally be able to socialize. And he will have much better help.


Quoting quickbooksworm:

When I need to see what's going on in the classroom, I drop in at school and creep outside the door. Does he have an IEP? I'd flat out ask to see some work he has done.



I grew up with a low functioning autistic cousin. She went to a school outside of Atlanta for autistic children until she aged out. They did a LOT of facilitated communication in the 90's and it curbed her meltdowns. The schools stopped usingusing it at one point because of the controversy. I've heard a lot of non verbal autistic kids will use their tablets to communicate.

Shy_Dia
by Emerald Member on May. 29, 2013 at 9:44 PM

i'd go to the school and see what he was doing. if possible, drop in every so often. i'd also schedule a parent teacher conference so you and the teacher can be 'on the same page'.

my son isnt autistic, but he rocks too. all the time. drives me NUTS! he does it from the time he wakes up til he goes to bed- and sometimes when he's sleeping too! lol actually- thats how he puts himself to sleep- bangs his head on the bed for a while.

i'd definitely pull him from the school and into a new one if you are already planning on moving. i'd go to each possible school, with a list of questions and see their curiculum (sp). i know that every kid is different- but at least they would have a somewhat idea of what they'd be teaching the kids, ya know.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 29, 2013 at 9:48 PM
He rocks when he's tired. Or upset. He use to do it constantly. My mom went through a ton of couches.

And we are planning on moving. And I WILL have a list. I'm not doing this crap with the schools. Either they can help with his education or they can't. I'm not sending him for coloring and cartoons.


Quoting Shy_Dia:

i'd go to the school and see what he was doing. if possible, drop in every so often. i'd also schedule a parent teacher conference so you and the teacher can be 'on the same page'.

my son isnt autistic, but he rocks too. all the time. drives me NUTS! he does it from the time he wakes up til he goes to bed- and sometimes when he's sleeping too! lol actually- thats how he puts himself to sleep- bangs his head on the bed for a while.

i'd definitely pull him from the school and into a new one if you are already planning on moving. i'd go to each possible school, with a list of questions and see their curiculum (sp). i know that every kid is different- but at least they would have a somewhat idea of what they'd be teaching the kids, ya know.


RoryPond
by Bronze Member on May. 29, 2013 at 9:53 PM
Getting an autistic kid in a good school can really help them, if you guys like the idea of moving then I would strongly recommend going for it, my autistic dd is 3 and a half and just the early intervention preschool they have done with her gas been amazing
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on May. 29, 2013 at 9:55 PM
My son is 5 and is low functioning. He goes to a public school but will be in special classes all day next yr and 90 min of regular kindegarten. He likes peter rabbit and yo gabba gabba. He doesn't like a lot and its too much to name but he loves his cars and american flags. He is a very picky eater. He also has short term memory issues so its hendering his learning because he doesn't remember what he has learned or that he just ate dinner 2 hrs ago. He is still in diapers, his speech is a mixture of jargon and tv commercials. I still dress him and feed him due to him not knowing how. He is being put on meds next week by his phsychiatrist because his regular ped isn't authorized to do so. He can't read, he can't write, he can't tell you his name or age, he can't tell you how he is doing, he will just repeat what you said or ignore you completly.
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