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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

The Amish Don't get Autism?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
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People outside the alternative health community are often confused by the lack of autism in the Amish people.  The Amish do not experience autism, or any of the other learning disabilities that plague our technological society.  The Amish live in a society that consists of outdated technologies and ideals, by contemporary standards.  Their diet consists of eating organic, fresh, locally-grown produce, and of course, they do not follow the established vaccination routines.  To the dismay of the mainstream media and the medical establishment, this has resulted in a healthier people, that are void of all of our chronic diseases.  Heart disease, cancer, and diabetes are virtually non-existent in Amish villages.  Equally non-existent are modern, chemically-engineered medicines, enhanced (chemically-engineered) foods, G.M.O. foods, and of course, vaccines.  How is it that those who are without the “miracles” of modern orthodox medicine are healthier?  The truth about health, medicine, and how they both relate to the Amish is becoming an embarrassment to some rather powerful people.

There have been 3 (yes three) verified cases of autism in the Amish, and at least two of those children were vaccinated.  No information is available for the third.  The strong correlation between vaccinations and autism is absolutely undeniable, unless you work for the medical establishment, the government, or Big Media.  Proponents of the status-quo claim that the Amish obviously have a special super gene that makes them immune to autism.  They pathetically try to rationalize that autism is some type of genetic failure (i.e. God’s fault), which attacks a brain based on religious affiliation.  We’re tentatively expecting a space alien theory next, in a similar vein to the aliens theory used to attack those who believe in a Creator.  This is truly is F.D.A. and A.M.A.science in all its shining glory.  Vaccine proponents are willing to espouse any ridiculous explanation, so long as they do not have to accept that their entire industry of vaccinations is causing chronic disease, leaving autism for1 in every 100 children now.

When the Amish are simply left alone, to live free of chemical toxins found in our medicines and foods, they are not plagued with diseases, learning disabilities, or autism.  They are categorically more intelligent, with the exception of advanced (college-level) writing skills, which is explainable by the fact that English is not their primary language.  Could it be those same Amish ‘super genes’ at work again?  Society could learn greatly from their example, if we would only stop poisoning ourselves, and our children on a routine basis.

Read More: The  Health Wyze Report

Photo Credit: Bob Jagendorf via Flickr

Posted by Anonymous on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:23 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:24 PM
Very interesting.
firemouse23
by Silver Member on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:26 PM
4 moms liked this

I still don't think it has anything to do with vaccines in humans...but hormones and vaccines in the animals we eat here in the mainstream.  The vaccinations haven't really changed over the years but the amount of chemicals in our food supply certainly has and so has autism.  In an effort to produce more and bigger we have sabotaged ourselves.

brandydesiree
by on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:27 PM
1 mom liked this
I could totally be Amish, it if wasn't for the clothes they wear and the fact that women must be silent. I like their way of life... Very clean living!
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:27 PM
6 moms liked this
Do they go to a doctor often?

Do they see specialists or psych doctors?

Are they routinely screened, like "regular" kids?
momto2boys973
by Emerald Member on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:28 PM
3 moms liked this
That's so not true...

https://imfar.confex.com/imfar/2010/webprogram/Paper7336.html

"Saturday, May 22, 2010
Franklin Hall B Level 4 (Philadelphia Marriott Downtown)
9:00 AM
J. L. Robinson , Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
L. Nations , Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
N. Suslowitz , Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
M. L. Cuccaro , Human Genetics, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL
J. Haines , Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
M. Pericak-Vance , Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
Background:
The prevalence rate of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) appears to be steadily increasing. The latest report from the Center for Disease Control estimates the rate of ASD is 1 in 91 children (Kogan, 2009), up from 1 in 150 in 2007. Understanding the seeming changes in ASD prevalence require careful exploration of genetic and environmental factors. A method that has proven useful in dissecting the etiology of complex diseases is the study of isolated populations. One population isolate that has been studied extensively is the Amish, with well over 250 genetic studies. Expanding studies of autism to the Amish may provide important information about etiology. A crucial first step in this process is a feasibility study to determine ASD prevalence rates in this population.

Objectives:

This study presents preliminary data on the estimated prevalence of ASD among the Amish in two Amish dominant counties as part of a larger epidemiological study. All children between ages 3 to 21 in those counties will be screened for the presence of an ASD.

Methods:

Screening occurred in Holmes County, Ohio and Elkhart-Lagrange County, Indiana, two of the largest Amish communities in the United States. Trained clinicians ascertained door to door using a published Amish Directory as a guide. Families were approached and asked to participate in a brief interview regarding their children. Two primary screening instruments were used: the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) and the DSM-IV-TR Checklist (a tool created by the authors). A Vaccination History and a brief family history including questions specific to the ASD phenotype were also taken. Children screening positive on either the SCQ or DSM-IV-TR Checklist were seen for a more comprehensive clinical evaluation by two licensed psychologists. This evaluation included the Autism Diagnostic Observational Schedule (ADOS) and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI).

Results:

From September 2008 to October 2009, 1899 Amish children were screened in the two Amish communities. A total of 25 children screened positive for ASD on either the SCQ or the DSM-IV-TR checklist. A total of 14 screened positive for ASD on both screeners. Of those 25 children, 14 were evaluated and seven children were confirmed as having a diagnosis of ASD using the ADI and/or ADOS, and clinical judgment. Interestingly, four of the seven only met ASD criteria on the ADOS but not the ADI. Three of the four who were not diagnosed by the ADI only missed criteria on the Behavioral Domain, which may be attributable to the reporting style of Amish caregivers.

Conclusions:

Preliminary data have identified the presence of ASD in the Amish community at a rate of approximately 1 in 271 children using standard ASD screening and diagnostic tools although some modifications may be in order. Further studies are underway to address the cultural norms and customs that may be playing a role in the reporting style of caregivers, as observed by the ADI. Accurate determination of the ASD phenotype in the Amish is a first step in the design of genetic studies of ASD in this population."
Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:30 PM
1 mom liked this
How do they know? They don't go to the doctors! Lol
momto2boys973
by Emerald Member on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:30 PM
More on this myth:

http://autism-news-beat.com/archives/29

(Sorry, can't make clickies on my phone)
Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:31 PM
1 mom liked this
If you Google it ...IT HAS TO BE TRUE! lol
jojo_star
by on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:32 PM
3 moms liked this

There are no proven links between vaccines and autism, in fact, that has been disproved. The Amish have a very different culture and way of living than we do, they eat healthy, they are exposed to very few chemicals, they live naturally. Also, who is to say they report any autism? They keep to themselves a lot and avoid Western Medicine. 

.betty.white.
by Platinum Member on Jun. 9, 2013 at 12:33 PM
Bump to read later
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