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Have you been to an endochrinologist? what goes on in the first visit?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 14 Replies

I have a referal for PCOS, possible pituitary adenoma. Is the first visit like going to a sergeon where its more of a consultation before the actual visit which is later? Or should I expect them to take tests and stuff the first visit?

Posted by Anonymous on Jun. 24, 2013 at 12:26 PM
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Replies (1-10):
4lilbundles
by Silver Member on Jun. 24, 2013 at 12:38 PM
I've never been to one but I assume they would ask you about your symptoms and draw blood for some tests.
DejaVooDoo
by Silver Member on Jul. 3, 2013 at 3:05 AM

I have a regular endocrinologist I see for previous pituitary surgery and now hormonal replacements. Any initial Endo consultation is the same when you see a new doctor. You go through your medical history together, you take your bloods if you have any, MRI of the tumour on your pituitary if any and go through case symptoms and history. They will then ask for more bloods and MRI's if necessary, and if it is something that they cannot treat (An Endocrinologist CANNOT treat a pituitary tumour if it needs surgery) then they will send you to a Neurosurgeon and in some cases an Ear, Nose, Throat Specialist (ENT) to discuss different alternatives to get the pituitary tumour out.

Have they told you yet what kind of pituitary tumour you have? There are many types. Non secreting tumours, hormonal secreting tumours (like prolactinomas, cushings disease, TSH secreting, acromegaly) and different sub classifications like rathke cleft cysts and craniopharyngiomas. There are even more, but you don't want to be hit too hard by information. My own old Endo thought I had a prolactinoma (prolactin excreting tumour) and it turned out to be a rathke cleft cyst. But they didn't know that until they went in and operated. I now have another one in the gland but there is no medicine treatment for it, except surgery and radiation. I'm holding off surgery or radiation at the moment. Because in a number of cases the masses inside the gland never grow and they may not be active. So I'm just watching. I prefer not to go through it again. But since the original surgery I had to have my cyst removed I'm on hormonal replacements. Thyroxine for thyroid, hydrocortisone/steroids for the adrenal glands and am waiting to get sexual hormone replacement (testosterone, progesterone and estrogen). Not all people who go through what I did ever need the hormonal replacement though. It depends on what your levels look like on blood reports. 

Supervane
by Ruby Member on Jul. 3, 2013 at 3:10 AM
I see an endocrinologist for my thyroid.
KGreen75
by on Jul. 3, 2013 at 3:11 AM
I see one for PCOS Andy thyroid.
You answer a lot of questions and they do blood work.
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SageAdvice
by on Jul. 3, 2013 at 3:12 AM

 My son has been, I think each persons visit is different depending on why they are there.

krissy920
by Gold Member on Jul. 3, 2013 at 3:12 AM

i take my daughter every 6 months for hormone growth issues and possibly back for a nasty pit gland test in october . The first and 2nd appointments for us were exact measurment and weight,  a lot of questions and labs.

sugarcrisp
by Ruby Member on Jul. 3, 2013 at 3:13 AM

We talked about my personal health history including number of pregnancies, live births, complications, family medical history, she did a physical exam and had my blood drawn. 

FlyingHottie
by Silver Member on Jul. 3, 2013 at 3:13 AM

Total medical history, mabey an ultrasound. Blood work, follow up visits... 

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Jul. 3, 2013 at 11:11 AM

prolactinoma is the current theory but I have not had a full work up yet. Other symptoms suggest it could be something different, but the milky boobs suggest prolactinoma. I was told that it is possible to get milky boobs from other kinds of tumors, but that one is the most likely.

Right now they are going to put me on a potassium sparring diurrettic that has androgen effects to hold me over until whatever they decide after that. My appointment has been moved 3 times. Right now it is on Friday at 5 pm, I am crossing my fingers that it stays there. If the diurretic helps, it could (supposedly, but I am unsure really) help either stop the growth or even shrink it, but not entirely. If either of those happens, I won't need surgery. I was also told that I need to weigh my risks and benefits as far as surgery is concerned. At this point I don't know what my longer term risks are if I do not have surgery. That is one of the questions I have.


Quoting DejaVooDoo:

I have a regular endocrinologist I see for previous pituitary surgery and now hormonal replacements. Any initial Endo consultation is the same when you see a new doctor. You go through your medical history together, you take your bloods if you have any, MRI of the tumour on your pituitary if any and go through case symptoms and history. They will then ask for more bloods and MRI's if necessary, and if it is something that they cannot treat (An Endocrinologist CANNOT treat a pituitary tumour if it needs surgery) then they will send you to a Neurosurgeon and in some cases an Ear, Nose, Throat Specialist (ENT) to discuss different alternatives to get the pituitary tumour out.

Have they told you yet what kind of pituitary tumour you have? There are many types. Non secreting tumours, hormonal secreting tumours (like prolactinomas, cushings disease, TSH secreting, acromegaly) and different sub classifications like rathke cleft cysts and craniopharyngiomas. There are even more, but you don't want to be hit too hard by information. My own old Endo thought I had a prolactinoma (prolactin excreting tumour) and it turned out to be a rathke cleft cyst. But they didn't know that until they went in and operated. I now have another one in the gland but there is no medicine treatment for it, except surgery and radiation. I'm holding off surgery or radiation at the moment. Because in a number of cases the masses inside the gland never grow and they may not be active. So I'm just watching. I prefer not to go through it again. But since the original surgery I had to have my cyst removed I'm on hormonal replacements. Thyroxine for thyroid, hydrocortisone/steroids for the adrenal glands and am waiting to get sexual hormone replacement (testosterone, progesterone and estrogen). Not all people who go through what I did ever need the hormonal replacement though. It depends on what your levels look like on blood reports. 



Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Jul. 3, 2013 at 11:14 AM

Also, my problem is: when they ask me what my symptoms are, I don't know what to say. I don't know what a symptom is, verses something that is just happening to my body. Like: I know milk in my boobs is a symptom, as well as acne. But do I say weight gain? Or is that just something that happened. I also get a rash on my skin and have serious issues with the heat and the sun. But do I tell the endochrinologist that? Or do I reserve that for my primary? I have belly aches and migraines alot. Are those symptoms? Or something totally different. I just don't know.

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