Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

How old was your child when they potty trained and how old are they now? Spin off question

I read a post and was just wondering.

I'm pretty old fashioned in my opinion about this. My kids were young, 18 months for my first and 14 months for my second. My first did regress though, due to a new daycare at about two and a half for a couple of months.

And if they were older than three, do you use pull-ups?
by on Jul. 5, 2013 at 10:35 PM
Replies (51-57):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 12 on Jul. 5, 2013 at 11:39 PM
18 months for my daughter who is now 15. She had accidents at night until she was almost 12.

3 years 3 months for my son just a few months ago.He has been dry since minus 2 accidents when he was playing and did not make it in time from outside...

Little one is 14 months. I am not going to rush it. When I think he is ready we will try.
HilbillyMamaof3
by on Jul. 5, 2013 at 11:39 PM
I think the routine is the same. We use diapers for sanitation purposes as to where even though available, these countries are poor, so they do not. They are still taking a child to a specific place to go and at a young age they are broke, not running around like animals.




Quoting Anonymous:

In America we are CIVILIZED and don't just let our kids piss and shit wherever they want. We teach them to use a toilet, and that's the hard part about potty training, any child could be trained if they could pop a squat anywhere. You want their potty training ideas, well you can have their sanitation, water and diseases too. 

Quoting TexanMomOf6:

(the following is quoted from the Global Post)


Kenya



The Digo people, a tribal group living in Kenya and Tanzania, start potty training infants when they are a few weeks old. Since there is nearly always someone tending babies in the Digo culture, they are able to immediately respond to the signs of discomfort. Babies who need to eliminate are taken outside and held over the ground in an appropriate place. By the time Digo children are 5 or 6 months old, they stay dry throughout the day and night.



China



Parents in China usually begin potty training when babies are a few months old. They hold the baby over a potty or by the edge of the road and whistle softly to imitate the tinkle of urine. Usually, by 6 months old, Chinese children are able to stay dry throughout the daytime. Most Chinese babies and toddlers wear open-crotch kaidangku training pants, as well, and by 12 to 14 months, they know to squat down to relieve themselves wherever they are.



India



In India, potty training starts when a child is about 6 months old. At frequent intervals, caregivers hold babies above the latrine and make a hissing sound to encourage them to eliminate at the scheduled times. In addition, most toddlers are left to walk around diaperless, wearing only a shirt. They are routinely praised for remaining clean and dry and scolded when they do not. The children are usually completely potty trained by the time they are 14 months old.



United States



The United States has a diverse population embracing several different approaches to potty training. However, a majority of U.S. parents watch for signs of readiness and then let their toddler set the pace. Parents often use special children's books, games and potty chairs to encourage their child’s cooperation and progress with potty training. They may also use positive reinforcement techniques such as rewards to get results. Most children are completely potty-trained between the ages of 2 to 3 years old.



Other Countries



Even though most parents in Great Britain now leave potty training completion until about 2 years old, a number of grandparents still advocate the completion of potty training by 6 months, as was the norm only a generation ago. Children in Cuba are usually completely potty trained by the age of a year and a half. On the other hand, German parents wait to introduce potty training to young toddlers and then let them progress at their own pace; most are out of diapers by age 3.



Anonymous
by Anonymous 11 on Jul. 5, 2013 at 11:41 PM

Uh huh. And you can't drink their water without getting really sick. 

Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I think the routine is the same. We use diapers for sanitation purposes as to where even though available, these countries are poor, so they do not. They are still taking a child to a specific place to go and at a young age they are broke, not running around like animals.




Quoting Anonymous:

In America we are CIVILIZED and don't just let our kids piss and shit wherever they want. We teach them to use a toilet, and that's the hard part about potty training, any child could be trained if they could pop a squat anywhere. You want their potty training ideas, well you can have their sanitation, water and diseases too. 

Quoting TexanMomOf6:

(the following is quoted from the Global Post)


Kenya



The Digo people, a tribal group living in Kenya and Tanzania, start potty training infants when they are a few weeks old. Since there is nearly always someone tending babies in the Digo culture, they are able to immediately respond to the signs of discomfort. Babies who need to eliminate are taken outside and held over the ground in an appropriate place. By the time Digo children are 5 or 6 months old, they stay dry throughout the day and night.



China



Parents in China usually begin potty training when babies are a few months old. They hold the baby over a potty or by the edge of the road and whistle softly to imitate the tinkle of urine. Usually, by 6 months old, Chinese children are able to stay dry throughout the daytime. Most Chinese babies and toddlers wear open-crotch kaidangku training pants, as well, and by 12 to 14 months, they know to squat down to relieve themselves wherever they are.



India



In India, potty training starts when a child is about 6 months old. At frequent intervals, caregivers hold babies above the latrine and make a hissing sound to encourage them to eliminate at the scheduled times. In addition, most toddlers are left to walk around diaperless, wearing only a shirt. They are routinely praised for remaining clean and dry and scolded when they do not. The children are usually completely potty trained by the time they are 14 months old.



United States



The United States has a diverse population embracing several different approaches to potty training. However, a majority of U.S. parents watch for signs of readiness and then let their toddler set the pace. Parents often use special children's books, games and potty chairs to encourage their child’s cooperation and progress with potty training. They may also use positive reinforcement techniques such as rewards to get results. Most children are completely potty-trained between the ages of 2 to 3 years old.



Other Countries



Even though most parents in Great Britain now leave potty training completion until about 2 years old, a number of grandparents still advocate the completion of potty training by 6 months, as was the norm only a generation ago. Children in Cuba are usually completely potty trained by the age of a year and a half. On the other hand, German parents wait to introduce potty training to young toddlers and then let them progress at their own pace; most are out of diapers by age 3.




Anonymous
by Anonymous 13 on Jul. 5, 2013 at 11:44 PM

My experience is the earlier you try doing it, the more you have to train yourself to remember to take them potty. My son and his wife are experiencing this. My granddaughter is constantly having accidents. She is 3-1/2yo but just doesn't care any more.

I really did not start potty training any of my four kids UNTIL 3 or 3-1/2yo and they just "got it" and did it. I waited until they were not having accidents at night.

Foolynroo2
by Emerald Member on Jul. 5, 2013 at 11:46 PM

My son was 35 months, He trained in two weeks, never used pull ups or any of that stuff.

Never had an accident since he was trained

He's 19 now.


carsonsmommytam
by Bronze Member on Jul. 5, 2013 at 11:46 PM
My son was fully day trained by 26 months ( he was fully pee trained at 22 months but struggled with the poo, lol) and night by 27 months. He just turned 4.
HilbillyMamaof3
by on Jul. 6, 2013 at 12:17 AM
No one is saying the 'specific place' isn't the back of the hut, or a hole right next to their water source. Education and economics have a lot to do with this. .

I just think that it's crazy, parents not potty training there kids. I've seen kids bring there parents a diaper when they need changed. Or hiding behind a chair to poop, while mom laughs about how cute it is. If the kid can control his BM until he is hidden, it's an easy next step. I've seen most kids do this around the walking stage, and a few when they were crawling. I guess I just don't get it.


Quoting Anonymous:

Uh huh. And you can't drink their water without getting really sick. 

Quoting HilbillyMamaof3:

I think the routine is the same. We use diapers for sanitation purposes as to where even though available, these countries are poor, so they do not. They are still taking a child to a specific place to go and at a young age they are broke, not running around like animals.









Quoting Anonymous:

In America we are CIVILIZED and don't just let our kids piss and shit wherever they want. We teach them to use a toilet, and that's the hard part about potty training, any child could be trained if they could pop a squat anywhere. You want their potty training ideas, well you can have their sanitation, water and diseases too. 

Quoting TexanMomOf6:

(the following is quoted from the Global Post)



Kenya





The Digo people, a tribal group living in Kenya and Tanzania, start potty training infants when they are a few weeks old. Since there is nearly always someone tending babies in the Digo culture, they are able to immediately respond to the signs of discomfort. Babies who need to eliminate are taken outside and held over the ground in an appropriate place. By the time Digo children are 5 or 6 months old, they stay dry throughout the day and night.





China





Parents in China usually begin potty training when babies are a few months old. They hold the baby over a potty or by the edge of the road and whistle softly to imitate the tinkle of urine. Usually, by 6 months old, Chinese children are able to stay dry throughout the daytime. Most Chinese babies and toddlers wear open-crotch kaidangku training pants, as well, and by 12 to 14 months, they know to squat down to relieve themselves wherever they are.





India





In India, potty training starts when a child is about 6 months old. At frequent intervals, caregivers hold babies above the latrine and make a hissing sound to encourage them to eliminate at the scheduled times. In addition, most toddlers are left to walk around diaperless, wearing only a shirt. They are routinely praised for remaining clean and dry and scolded when they do not. The children are usually completely potty trained by the time they are 14 months old.





United States





The United States has a diverse population embracing several different approaches to potty training. However, a majority of U.S. parents watch for signs of readiness and then let their toddler set the pace. Parents often use special children's books, games and potty chairs to encourage their child’s cooperation and progress with potty training. They may also use positive reinforcement techniques such as rewards to get results. Most children are completely potty-trained between the ages of 2 to 3 years old.





Other Countries





Even though most parents in Great Britain now leave potty training completion until about 2 years old, a number of grandparents still advocate the completion of potty training by 6 months, as was the norm only a generation ago. Children in Cuba are usually completely potty trained by the age of a year and a half. On the other hand, German parents wait to introduce potty training to young toddlers and then let them progress at their own pace; most are out of diapers by age 3.






Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)