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Thanks MIL!

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 16 Replies
So, I'm pregnant with our 3rd baby. No matter what after this child we are done. DF and I talked about what to do after this baby is born (in terms of BC) I suggested a vasectomy. I explained it was a simple procedure for him where for me it would be major surgery. He agreed and we've started saving.

Well his mom asked because she's nosey about what we were going to do after this baby is born. DF told her he was getting a vasectomy. So of course she looked at me and said "that's not going to stop you from getting pregnant." Um.. what? "Yeah you could still get pregnant by someone else."

Uh... thanks MIL for thinking either A. We aren't staying together or B. I'll cheat. Whacko.
Posted by Anonymous on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:32 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:34 AM
I don't tell mil that kind of stuff... She is queen of tmi as it is. I know all about FILs vasectomy, and how nothing comes out after his prostate cancer surgery. I didn't ask about either btw.
BekahBrownEyes
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:34 AM
1 mom liked this
What a fucking bitch. Pathetic too. Did DF say ANYTHING to her?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:37 AM
I don't tell her anything. We are looking into buying a minivan and I didn't even want to tell her that. She complains about everything. My DF has a big mouth though.


Quoting Anonymous:

I don't tell mil that kind of stuff... She is queen of tmi as it is. I know all about FILs vasectomy, and how nothing comes out after his prostate cancer surgery. I didn't ask about either btw.

Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:38 AM

Tubal Ligation isn't  "major surgery" well it isn't for most ladies. You could get it done if you are having a C-Section or a few days afterwards and before you leave the hospital.

MIL sounds like a Whacky doodle, lol

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:38 AM
Eh.. I think he said something. Not really what I wanted to say but I walked away.


Quoting BekahBrownEyes:

What a fucking bitch. Pathetic too. Did DF say ANYTHING to her?

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:40 AM
I don't have C-sections. I would have to be cut open and that's not cool. Lol.

She is nuts.


Quoting Sassy762:

Tubal Ligation isn't  "major surgery" well it isn't for most ladies. You could get it done if you are having a C-Section or a few days afterwards and before you leave the hospital.

MIL sounds like a Whacky doodle, lol


Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:43 AM
Damn if your df ever gets paranoid about you cheating you'll know where that seed of doubt started growing
Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:43 AM

Okay but you wouldn't be cut open....I googled this info for you

I almost had one after my 6th child BUT I chickened out right before they wheeled me in the delivery room, lol

Female sterilization

Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board
Last updated: August 2012

What is female sterilization?

Female sterilization is a procedure designed to make a woman infertile. It's done by blocking the fallopian tubes so sperm can't reach an egg and fertilize it.

One sterilization method is tubal ligation (formerly known as "getting your tubes tied) in which a doctor surgically closes the tubes. There's also a non-surgical method. In this case, a tiny device is threaded through the cervix into each fallopian tube where it causes scar tissue to grow and permanently plug the tubes.

These procedures are considered permanent, so some states require a waiting period before you can schedule them.

How much does it cost?

The cost of sterilization procedures ranges from $1,500 to $6,000. Most insurance companies will cover at least part of the cost of the procedure.

In fact, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, insurance plans must now cover contraception and sterilization with no cost to you. Plans that existed on March 23, 2010 – and some religiously affiliated employers -- are exempt, but many are complying with the changes anyway.

What's tubal ligation like?

Tubal ligation used to mean major abdominal surgery. These days it's usually a much less invasive outpatient procedure. You may have it done during delivery if you're having a c-section or within 48 hours of a vaginal delivery. Otherwise, you must wait six weeks to have it done.

First, the surgeon will give you a local, regional, or general anesthetic (whichever is best for you). Then, after inflating your abdomen with carbon dioxide gas, she'll make a small cut in or just below your belly button and insert a laparoscope — a narrow tube with a light and a tiny magnifying glass on the end. This tool allows the surgeon to find your tubes.

She may make another small incision (usually near your pubic bone) to insert the instrument used to block the tubes. There are several options here — you can have the tubes cauterized, cut and stitched closed, or pinched shut with an elastic band or metal clip. When the doctor's finished, she'll stitch up the small incisions in your abdomen.

(Tubal ligation can also be performed right after giving birth — either vaginally or via C-section. The uterus is still high enough in the abdomen right after delivery that the doctor can see the tubes easily without inflating the area with carbon dioxide.)

The procedure generally takes about 30 minutes. Afterward, you'll probably be up and around within eight hours, but you may feel some pain for several days. (See your doctor if the abdominal pain or swelling gets worse instead of better.) You should give yourself a few days to a week before you start exercising or having sex again.

How does nonsurgical sterilization work?

You must wait for at least six to eight weeks after your deliver to have nonsurgical sterilization.

In this procedure, a doctor inserts small metallic implants into the fallopian tubes by way of the vagina and cervix. (It's also known as transcervical sterilization.) No cuts or abdominal incisions are necessary. Once the implants are in place, scar tissue forms around each device, permanently blocking the tubes.

The procedure usually requires only local anesthesia and takes anywhere from a few minutes to half an hour. Aside from some minor cramping, you'll probably feel back to normal the same day.

You'll need a follow-up X-ray three months after the implants are inserted to make sure the tubes are blocked. (You'll need to use a back-up method of contraception until then.)

Quoting Anonymous:

I don't have C-sections. I would have to be cut open and that's not cool. Lol.

She is nuts.


Quoting Sassy762:

Tubal Ligation isn't  "major surgery" well it isn't for most ladies. You could get it done if you are having a C-Section or a few days afterwards and before you leave the hospital.

MIL sounds like a Whacky doodle, lol



Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:47 AM
1 mom liked this
Eh.. I've been through enough with 3 pregnancies. Lol. My wonderful DF can share the joy. :) Hospitals and doctors in general freak me out!! Lol.


Quoting Sassy762:

Okay but you wouldn't be cut open....I googled this info for you

I almost had one after my 6th child BUT I chickened out right before they wheeled me in the delivery room, lol

Female sterilization

Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board
Last updated: August 2012

What is female sterilization?

Female sterilization is a procedure designed to make a woman infertile. It's done by blocking the fallopian tubes so sperm can't reach an egg and fertilize it.

One sterilization method is tubal ligation (formerly known as "getting your tubes tied) in which a doctor surgically closes the tubes. There's also a non-surgical method. In this case, a tiny device is threaded through the cervix into each fallopian tube where it causes scar tissue to grow and permanently plug the tubes.

These procedures are considered permanent, so some states require a waiting period before you can schedule them.

How much does it cost?

The cost of sterilization procedures ranges from $1,500 to $6,000. Most insurance companies will cover at least part of the cost of the procedure.

In fact, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, insurance plans must now cover contraception and sterilization with no cost to you. Plans that existed on March 23, 2010 – and some religiously affiliated employers -- are exempt, but many are complying with the changes anyway.

What's tubal ligation like?

Tubal ligation used to mean major abdominal surgery. These days it's usually a much less invasive outpatient procedure. You may have it done during delivery if you're having a c-section or within 48 hours of a vaginal delivery. Otherwise, you must wait six weeks to have it done.

First, the surgeon will give you a local, regional, or general anesthetic (whichever is best for you). Then, after inflating your abdomen with carbon dioxide gas, she'll make a small cut in or just below your belly button and insert a laparoscope — a narrow tube with a light and a tiny magnifying glass on the end. This tool allows the surgeon to find your tubes.

She may make another small incision (usually near your pubic bone) to insert the instrument used to block the tubes. There are several options here — you can have the tubes cauterized, cut and stitched closed, or pinched shut with an elastic band or metal clip. When the doctor's finished, she'll stitch up the small incisions in your abdomen.

(Tubal ligation can also be performed right after giving birth — either vaginally or via C-section. The uterus is still high enough in the abdomen right after delivery that the doctor can see the tubes easily without inflating the area with carbon dioxide.)

The procedure generally takes about 30 minutes. Afterward, you'll probably be up and around within eight hours, but you may feel some pain for several days. (See your doctor if the abdominal pain or swelling gets worse instead of better.) You should give yourself a few days to a week before you start exercising or having sex again.

How does nonsurgical sterilization work?

You must wait for at least six to eight weeks after your deliver to have nonsurgical sterilization.

In this procedure, a doctor inserts small metallic implants into the fallopian tubes by way of the vagina and cervix. (It's also known as transcervical sterilization.) No cuts or abdominal incisions are necessary. Once the implants are in place, scar tissue forms around each device, permanently blocking the tubes.

The procedure usually requires only local anesthesia and takes anywhere from a few minutes to half an hour. Aside from some minor cramping, you'll probably feel back to normal the same day.

You'll need a follow-up X-ray three months after the implants are inserted to make sure the tubes are blocked. (You'll need to use a back-up method of contraception until then.)

Quoting Anonymous:

I don't have C-sections. I would have to be cut open and that's not cool. Lol.



She is nuts.





Quoting Sassy762:

Tubal Ligation isn't  "major surgery" well it isn't for most ladies. You could get it done if you are having a C-Section or a few days afterwards and before you leave the hospital.

MIL sounds like a Whacky doodle, lol





Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:49 AM

Quoting Anonymous:

Eh.. I've been through enough with 3 pregnancies. Lol. My wonderful DF can share the joy. :) Hospitals and doctors in general freak me out!! Lol.


Quoting Sassy762:

Okay but you wouldn't be cut open....I googled this info for you

I almost had one after my 6th child BUT I chickened out right before they wheeled me in the delivery room, lol

Female sterilization

Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board
Last updated: August 2012

What is female sterilization?

Female sterilization is a procedure designed to make a woman infertile. It's done by blocking the fallopian tubes so sperm can't reach an egg and fertilize it.

One sterilization method is tubal ligation (formerly known as "getting your tubes tied) in which a doctor surgically closes the tubes. There's also a non-surgical method. In this case, a tiny device is threaded through the cervix into each fallopian tube where it causes scar tissue to grow and permanently plug the tubes.

These procedures are considered permanent, so some states require a waiting period before you can schedule them.

How much does it cost?

The cost of sterilization procedures ranges from $1,500 to $6,000. Most insurance companies will cover at least part of the cost of the procedure.

In fact, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, insurance plans must now cover contraception and sterilization with no cost to you. Plans that existed on March 23, 2010 – and some religiously affiliated employers -- are exempt, but many are complying with the changes anyway.

What's tubal ligation like?

Tubal ligation used to mean major abdominal surgery. These days it's usually a much less invasive outpatient procedure. You may have it done during delivery if you're having a c-section or within 48 hours of a vaginal delivery. Otherwise, you must wait six weeks to have it done.

First, the surgeon will give you a local, regional, or general anesthetic (whichever is best for you). Then, after inflating your abdomen with carbon dioxide gas, she'll make a small cut in or just below your belly button and insert a laparoscope — a narrow tube with a light and a tiny magnifying glass on the end. This tool allows the surgeon to find your tubes.

She may make another small incision (usually near your pubic bone) to insert the instrument used to block the tubes. There are several options here — you can have the tubes cauterized, cut and stitched closed, or pinched shut with an elastic band or metal clip. When the doctor's finished, she'll stitch up the small incisions in your abdomen.

(Tubal ligation can also be performed right after giving birth — either vaginally or via C-section. The uterus is still high enough in the abdomen right after delivery that the doctor can see the tubes easily without inflating the area with carbon dioxide.)

The procedure generally takes about 30 minutes. Afterward, you'll probably be up and around within eight hours, but you may feel some pain for several days. (See your doctor if the abdominal pain or swelling gets worse instead of better.) You should give yourself a few days to a week before you start exercising or having sex again.

How does nonsurgical sterilization work?

You must wait for at least six to eight weeks after your deliver to have nonsurgical sterilization.

In this procedure, a doctor inserts small metallic implants into the fallopian tubes by way of the vagina and cervix. (It's also known as transcervical sterilization.) No cuts or abdominal incisions are necessary. Once the implants are in place, scar tissue forms around each device, permanently blocking the tubes.

The procedure usually requires only local anesthesia and takes anywhere from a few minutes to half an hour. Aside from some minor cramping, you'll probably feel back to normal the same day.

You'll need a follow-up X-ray three months after the implants are inserted to make sure the tubes are blocked. (You'll need to use a back-up method of contraception until then.)

Quoting Anonymous:

I don't have C-sections. I would have to be cut open and that's not cool. Lol.



She is nuts.





Quoting Sassy762:

Tubal Ligation isn't  "major surgery" well it isn't for most ladies. You could get it done if you are having a C-Section or a few days afterwards and before you leave the hospital.

MIL sounds like a Whacky doodle, lol






Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

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