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Why do birds and squrrels not get electracuted...

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 33 Replies
When running/landing on power lines? My 6 year old dd asted today. I honosly had never think about it? Why doent they? Lol.
Posted by Anonymous on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:45 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:46 PM
Asked*
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:46 PM
1 mom liked this

cause they aren't grounded to anything? yea that's my best guess, not sure....off to ask dh lol

TeamTARDIS
by on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:47 PM
Squirrels do if the touch more than one line.
MrsDavidB25
by Stacey on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:47 PM
2 moms liked this

 

bren_mom
by on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:47 PM

I think it's becuase:

1) the lines are insulated with a thick rubber coating

and

2) the lines are not grounded.  I think if you were to touch the ground and the line at the same time it could be bad... but I also think I heard that on Tango and Cash, so I'm not sure how accurate it is :) 

12345abcde54321
by Ruby Member on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:48 PM
1 mom liked this

yup, because they are not grounded. they have to be touching something else for the electricity to pass through their bodies and electrocute them. even then, most of those wires probably aren't exposed..

mattiehatter
by Mary on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:48 PM
1 mom liked this
I don't know, but I once saw a dead bird hanging upside-down from a power line. I laughed for a good half hour.
PinkHart
by on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:48 PM
How can birds sit on electrical wires and not get electrocuted? asks Jonathan Sanchez, a student in Lynbrook, NY.High above the ground, electrical and telephone poles and their connecting wires must seem made for birds, like artificial trees with limbs that stretch on forever. Sometimes a hundred birds will be stretched out along a wire, in a kind of high-tension convention.How come a bird on a wire doesn't get shocked? When the bird perches on a live wire, her body becomes charged--for the moment, it's at the same voltage as the wire. But no current flows into her body. A body is a poor conductor compared to copper wire, so there's no reason for electrons to take a detour through the bird. More importantly, electrons current flow from a region of high voltage to one of low voltage. The drifting current, in effect, ignores the bird.But if a bird (or a power line worker) accidentally touches an electrical "ground" while in contact with the high-voltage wire, she completes an electrical circuit. A ground is a region of approximately zero voltage. The earth, and anything touching it that can conduct current, is the ground.Like water flowing over a dam into a river, current surges through the bird (or person's) body on its way into the ground. Severe injury or death by electrocution is the result.That's why a squirrel can run across an electrical line, but sadly die when its foot makes contact with the (grounded) transformer on the pole at wire's end.It's also why drivers and passengers are warned to stay inside the car if it runs into a downed power line. Touching the ground with your foot would complete the circuit: Electrons would flow from the wire, into the car, and through you on their way into the earth. (Inside the car you are usually protected by the car's four rubber tires, which act as insulators between car and ground.)Likewise, birds can get in trouble with power lines if wing or wrist bones--or wet feathers--connect bare wires and grounds.Raptors (birds of prey) are especially likely to be killed by power lines, particularly in the western U.S. In wide-open plains and deserts, power poles are often the only high perches available for hunters like Bald and Golden eagles and Great Horned owls, who survey the landscape for prey and take off into rising wind currents.Such large birds can easily contact two wires or a wire and a transformer with their great wingspread. And raptors can easily brush against a live wire while settling onto a (grounded) pole-top. Thousands are killed by power lines each year.How to protect big birds? Power lines can be made less dangerous by widening the gap between conducting and ground wires, insulating wires and metal parts, and moving wires farther away from pole tops. And guards can be built around favorite raptor perches.
crazy4u49033
by Bronze Member on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:48 PM
Bc they are at the same potential. They are only touching the wire and are not grounded out.
Acid
by on Jul. 31, 2013 at 8:49 PM

Because no one gets electracuted.

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