Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Co sleeping death:(

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
http://www.wwmt.com/news/features/featured/stories/battle-creek-infant-dies-cosleeping-accident-2052.shtml?wap=0
Poor baby was smothered :(
Posted by Anonymous on Aug. 17, 2013 at 1:22 AM
Replies (211-212):
newmommy2131
by Member on Aug. 17, 2013 at 9:23 PM

That is so sad. :(


kailu1835
by Ruby Member on Aug. 17, 2013 at 10:35 PM

Biology doesn't lie, and you can't improve on nature.  No, the hormones are not the same, and the physiological changes are not the same in bottle feeders as in breastfeeders, no matter how desparately you wish it were so.  The two will never be the same, but bottle feeding is a good second option for moms who can't breastfeed, as long as you do have skin to skin to skin contact.  It will release some oxytocin, but nothing like what you're flooded with when you have nipple stimulation from a sucking baby.

Quoting Anonymous:

Biology doesn't lie. All humans produce the hormone from touch. I know breast feeders want to be the only special ones, oxitocin is released from skin to skin contact as well as endorphins.

Quoting kailu1835:

No, it really doesn't. if you are not breastfeeding, there are several hormones that you are incapable of producing. That is not to say that bottle feeders cannot bond well with their baby but study after study proves over and over again that it is not the same. The physiological changes that come with breastfeeding are absent when not bottle feeding, and the risk of smothering your baby are higher when not breastfeeding, no matter how hard you might wish otherwise.



And none of this refutes the benefits of skin to skin contact.




Quoting Anonymous:

Actually skin to skin contact and touching will produce the same hormones and release endorphins.





We have known for a long time that skin-to-skin contact with babies is important for their development. In what ways does it help them?


Particularly in the newborn period, it helps calm babies: they cry less and it helps them sleep better. There are some studies that show their brain development is facilitated—probably because they are calmer and sleep better.





Does skin-to-skin contact with their babies have benefits for the parents?


It seems to help the mothers, too. It reduces their stress level—they report lower levels of depression, they seem to be able to be more sensitive to their baby's cues and the babies are more responsive to the mother through the whole first three months. They're recognizing their mother earlier, so the relationship between the mother and baby is off to a facilitated start. It works the same way with fathers, too.





There is some interesting work showing that mothers who have just given birth, their skin area on their chest is a degree or two higher than the rest of their body, creating a natural warming area for the newborn. They have the ability to thermoregulate for the baby—if the baby's temperature drops, the mother's temperature rises, and if the baby's temperature rises, the mother's drops. There seems to be a connection between mother and baby from the birthing process itself.





What is happening in the body—of both parent and child—when there is skin-to-skin contact?


From the mother's perspective, it releases oxytocin. On the behavioral level, if you have a baby that is more relaxed and sleeping better, that's going to relax the mother more.





The newborn is coming out of a very restrictive environment, so anything that simulates that comforts them. Being touched or hearing a heartbeat is familiar because they heard it in the womb.























Quoting kailu1835:You didn't produce the same hormones. It isnt a stab at bottle feeders its a physiological fact.





Quoting TishHughes:Mmmmm, yeah. Ok. I bottle fed and was way in tune with where my child was, tit nazi.





Quoting poietes:They can, its just not as safe. Neither is formula feeding mothers. Breastfeeding mothers are just more in tune with where the baby is. If the father is a very very light sleeper it could probably be ok but its proven that generally its not as safe.





Quoting Anonymous:So dads can't co sleep? That's kinda ridiculous








Quoting 3MusketeerMama:Because safe bed sharing practice (or co-sleeping if you prefer) includes the baby sleeping next to the breastfeeding mother. Quoting Anonymous:Why is FATHER and BOTTLE capped?








Quoting 3MusketeerMama:Article says it was the FATHER after feeding the baby a BOTTLE. Enough said.



babiesbabybaby development

Hi!  My name is Jenn!

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN