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Grandmother Blames Library for Letting 9-Year-Old Check Out Erotic Book

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Grandmother Blames Library for Letting 9-Year-Old Check Out Erotic Book

by Sasha Brown-Worsham

library blamed erotic bookAn Indiana grandmother is furious after her 9-year-old grandson was allowed to check out Night Games by Crystal Jordan via self check-out at the library. The book, apparently, is a sexually explicit erotic novel and is wholly inappropriate for young children. That much is true. But the library was fairly unapologetic, telling the grandmother that it's her responsibility to keep her kids from reading that stuff.

The question: Was the library in the right? I am going with yes.

While I agree with the grandmother that it's disturbing -- and lord knows I would be bothered -- the library is right here. It's a public library, which means they can and should have a lot of books for people to choose from and some of those books may not be for children.

See video here.

The reality is, as parents or guardians, it's our job to protect our kids from what they see. It's one thing to keep things out of a school library, but even that is a slippery slope.

Some of my earliest "erotic" memories come from stealing books from my parents' friends and reading them. Obviously my parents didn't condone this, but hey, they should have kept a better eye on me, right?

We are parents. As parents it's OUR job and our job only to protect our kids. I am sorry for this grandmother. That is upsetting. But the library is right here. As a public library, their job is to make sure the public has access to books.

Hiding books from people isn't the job of the library, and much as I don't think a 9-year-old should be reading that stuff, at least he's reading, right? He's showing an avid interest in books! It's not all bad.

Do you think the library is at fault here?

by on Aug. 22, 2013 at 8:20 AM
Replies (31-40):
lwalker270
by Ruby Member on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:31 AM

I agree with the library.  It's my job as a parent to ensure that the books my children check out are age-appropriate.  


zetajen
by on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:32 AM
1 mom liked this

do books have standards of ages. Like dirty magazines, you have to be a certain age to buy it. Is there something similar for books? If so, a library should age check any literature on the mature list and this would be the library's fault. if there is no such system, perhaps there should be.

Parents are responsible for keeping an eye on children, but I believe it takes a villiage too. communities should work together towards providing a safe, healthy enviroment for children in any way they can. I think that means having categories of books based on age. Any parent would be welcome to let their child read something outside of the realm deemed appropriate for that age. I think a simple safe guard would be a good thing. I personally don't want my child to read a graphic description of a murder before he is capable of dealing with that and not having nightmares.

SusanTheWriter
by on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:32 AM

There IS an explicit label on the book! It says "WARNING! This is a REALLY HOT book. (Sexually Explicit)" right on the back!

And just because it's intended for adults, doesn't mean it's porn. There is a difference between erotic literature and pornography.

I'm convinced the kid knew what he was doing when he went through the self check-out.

Quoting TranquilMind:

Where was the book?  Did someone stick it in the children's section?

It is our job, but geez...a 9 year old shouldn't be able to check out pornography.   There should at least be an explicit label or something.


ms-superwoman
by on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:33 AM

Where was the grandmother at when he was checking out this book? She should have been watching.

SusanTheWriter
by on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:39 AM
2 moms liked this

Then you're assuming that every child reads on grade level or has the same level of maturity based on their age. You're also assuming that parental values are all the same, and nothing could be further from the truth.

Parents are ultimately responsible for what their kids read, but if they use the library as a drop-off service, then do they expect the library to pick up where they're leaving off? Is that a library's duty? Certainly not! As I said before, a library is responsible for making certain people have access to all kinds of reading material. They are NOT responsible for judging what people read, no matter their age.

Quoting zetajen:

do books have standards of ages. Like dirty magazines, you have to be a certain age to buy it. Is there something similar for books? If so, a library should age check any literature on the mature list and this would be the library's fault. if there is no such system, perhaps there should be.

Parents are responsible for keeping an eye on children, but I believe it takes a villiage too. communities should work together towards providing a safe, healthy enviroment for children in any way they can. I think that means having categories of books based on age. Any parent would be welcome to let their child read something outside of the realm deemed appropriate for that age. I think a simple safe guard would be a good thing. I personally don't want my child to read a graphic description of a murder before he is capable of dealing with that and not having nightmares.


JanineDeer
by Janine on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:41 AM

NINE? NO they should not have access to porn.   That is soft-core porn and no no no we are to protect their non- fully formed brains yet from that until they are a lot older.

When I was a kid, I had to have special permission from my parents to go into the "regular" section of the library- otherwise one had to be happy with the junior section.

I would not be happy either if my nine year old was allowed to check out a book like that.

MrsSexyCurtains
by on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:45 AM
I agree. We have self check outs at our library back home. I always double check what books dd picks out and let her scan them herself. She loves it and feels like a librarian lol.

The boy knew what he was checking out, there's no way you can think that book was about video games. Grandma needs to stop blaming others for what her grandson did. If she wants something done, then she needs to go with him every time he goes.


Quoting SusanTheWriter:

If you've seen the cover of the book, it's not like it wasn't INCREDIBLY obvious that it was inappropriate for children. The boy knew what he was checking out and by using the self-checkout, he was probably trying to sneak something past. Luckily, his father caught him (not his grandma).

So Dad did his job, but Granny is making a stink because she thinks it's the library's responsibility to raise children.

No. It's the library's responsibility to serve the reading public, no matter what they choose to read.

And age-restricted library cards are usually only for kids who are 6 and under.


TranquilMind
by Ruby Member on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:53 AM

 Oh, ok.  Glad there is a label.  This is not the kind of thing I would read, so I didn't know.

I disagree with you .  "Erotic literature" is just another name for porn.  Or "women's porn", as a friend of mine calls it.  Women are more verbal and would rather read descriptions than look at photos. 
A rose by any other name...

Quoting SusanTheWriter:

There IS an explicit label on the book! It says "WARNING! This is a REALLY HOT book. (Sexually Explicit)" right on the back!

And just because it's intended for adults, doesn't mean it's porn. There is a difference between erotic literature and pornography.

I'm convinced the kid knew what he was doing when he went through the self check-out.

Quoting TranquilMind:

Where was the book?  Did someone stick it in the children's section?

It is our job, but geez...a 9 year old shouldn't be able to check out pornography.   There should at least be an explicit label or something.


 

MamaRae85
by *you're on Aug. 22, 2013 at 10:57 AM

I agree. I'm surprised and disappointed at how many replies to this post have said their library has restrictions on juvenile cards. I think it's a slippery slope that these libraries are finding themselves on.

Quoting fraujones:

The library is absolutely right. This kind of issue angries up my blood! I work in a library, and it is not our job to censor what kids read. In fact, its ethical to do the opposite. Once we start making judgment calls, things go to hell. It's up to the parents/guardians to be invested in what their kids are reading. 


Anonymous
by Anonymous on Aug. 22, 2013 at 11:00 AM

Our library doesn't have erotic books, and I've never seen one in Ohio that does and I've been to a lot of libraries here since I'm a bibliophile.  I'd like to check out a good really sexy book from the library.  Unfortunately, there are none here, ever.  If you want an erotic novel you have to buy it.

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