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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

HE CAN'T CARRY HIS INHALER!!!! EDIT/UPDATE EDIT 2

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 371 Replies
1 mom liked this

I find it ridiculous that an 8th grader is not allowed to carry his emergency inhaler w/him at school!

So now if he's at gym & has an attack someone needs to hurry up & run all the way to the other end of the school, get his inhaler & run all the way back.

Goodness, this isn't elementary school!

EDIT:  I am making sure he carries his inhaler at all times. He takes his bookbag from class to class so he can keep it in there.  He is responsible w/his & knows the risks of sharing so I know he won't share or just waste his inhaler.

I called & spoke w/the principal & told him I had an issue w/the police when the Dr sent in a note & there was an issue at the end of last year when nobody could find the nurse to get my son his meds & I refused to take that risk this year.  We have a meeting next week.

Oh & he will be keeping a Drs note w/him as well until this issue is cleared up.

We also had a Drs note for him to carry it w/him at all times, the nurse said it did not matter as it is against school policy.

EDIT 2: Ok bc I question myself all the time does this mean these states have laws that students CAN carry their inhalers?

Unfortunately the link they provided at the bottom is not working for me.  But here is the link where I found this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1448405/

STATE LAWS AND POLICIES ALLOWING INHALERS

As of April 2004, 38 states allow self-medication among students at school. Twenty-three states (Alabama,15 Delaware,16 Florida,17 Georgia,18 Illinois,19 Kentucky,20 Maine, 21 Massachusetts,22 Michigan,23 Minnesota,24 Mississippi,25 Missouri,26 New Hampshire,27 New Jersey,28 New York,29 Ohio,30 Oklahoma,31 Rhode Island,32 Tennessee,33 Texas,34 Utah,35 Virginia,36 and Wisconsin37) have enacted legislation specifically to allow students with asthma to possess and self-administer inhaled asthma medications while at school. These laws require parental consent and permission from a physician or other health care provider. Also, the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2000 found that an additional 10 states (Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, and Washington) have adopted policies allowing students to self-medicate at school with prescription inhalers.38 Five other states (California,39 Connecticut,40 Indiana,41 Iowa,42 and Oregon43) have laws broadly providing for the self-administration of medications. Because state laws are often changing, interested readers can access the National Conference of State Legislatures Web site to monitor legislative action related to asthma, including self-medication laws (http://www.ncsl.org/programs/esnr/asthmamain.htm).

I also found this(http://www.aanma.org/advocacy/meds-at-school/):

AANMA and supporters pushed for years to make sure all 50 states had laws protecting students’ rights to carry and use asthma and anaphylaxis medications at school. It wasn’t easy, but the last state passed its asthma-medication law in 2010! Now that Rhode Island passed legislation in May, New York is the last state that still needs an anaphylaxis law.

AANMA’s Breathe: It’s the Law awareness campaign doesn’t stop once these laws are on the books. Parents, teachers, school nurses — YOU can contact local schools and make sure they know this law exists and what it means for them. Here’s an FAQ sheet to share with your child’s teachers, school nurse, P.E. teacher and coaches. We’re grateful to legislators for helping us get these laws passed — now it’s time to save lives!

What is Breathe: It’s the Law?
A campaign to make sure students in EVERY state can carry and self-administer their life-saving asthma and anaphylaxis medications. AANMA spearheaded this campaign with support from volunteers and legislators in every state.

Why is it important?
Every school year students have died because they were unable to get to their asthma or anaphylaxis medications on time. The medications were locked in a nurse’s cabinet or stowed away in a place too far to get to when the student needed them. Minutes count when asthma or anaphylaxis strikes. Students need to carry these medications on them, know when and how to use them — and then do it!

Do we have these laws in every state?
In 2010 we celebrated that all 50 states protect students’ rights to carry and self-administer asthma medications. But our work’s not done – one state – New York — still needs to pass a law permitting students to carry and use their anaphylaxis medications.

AANMA supports New York Senate Bill 2210 and Assembly Bill 2566, which would permit students to carry and self-administer prescribed auto-injectable epinephrine during the school day.

We urge all New York legislators to support S2210 and A2566, introduced in 2013, to permit students in New York state to carry and self-administer prescribed auto-injectable epinephrine during the school day.

New York residents: contact your legislators by phone or email and urge them to vote “YES” on S2210 and A2566. Find your Assembly and Senate representative at http://assembly.state.ny.us/ and http://www.nysenate.gov/

I live in a state that has passed these laws — how can I make sure my school knows about the laws and allows students to carry and use their medications?

Visit your school and hand them this fact sheet! Bring copies for the principal and school nurse, a few extra for other teachers. They can visit www.aanma.org/advocacy/meds-at-school and click on their state to read exactly what the law is.

The Breathe: It’s the Law campaign was sponsored by Mylan Specialty L.P.

- See more at: http://www.aanma.org/advocacy/meds-at-school/#sthash.UXTDQc2v.dpuf

So seriously schools all across the country are breaking laws?  Do I have that right?

 

Posted by Anonymous on Sep. 5, 2013 at 3:57 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Roxygurl
by Emerald Member on Sep. 5, 2013 at 3:58 PM
9 moms liked this
Welcome to a no tolerance drug free school :-/
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conniejo75
by Platinum Member on Sep. 5, 2013 at 3:58 PM
13 moms liked this
My son can't either and he's in high school.... BUT... I have him carry it anyway .
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alt075
by Silver Member on Sep. 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM

I agree. That is not right. He is not a little kid anymore. :(

mistie900
by Gold Member on Sep. 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM
I think it's dumb too but I see why they do it. I remember hearing about boys in school using inhalers in the locker room trying to get high. At our school you could not carry any medicine at all and you had to go to the office if you wanted a cough drop.
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Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Sep. 5, 2013 at 4:01 PM

 How do you do that?

The forms have you mark if he has asthma & if he needs an inhaler.  Do you just not send one in?


Quoting conniejo75:

My son can't either and he's in high school.... BUT... I have him carry it anyway .


 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Sep. 5, 2013 at 4:01 PM
6 moms liked this

Don't take no for an answer.  Get your doc on board.  My fifth grader has carried her inhaler since Kinder.

conniejo75
by Platinum Member on Sep. 5, 2013 at 4:02 PM
3 moms liked this
Yea I filled it out. One is left at office, but he carries an extra in his backpack


Quoting Anonymous:

 How do you do that?


The forms have you mark if he has asthma & if he needs an inhaler.  Do you just not send one in?




Quoting conniejo75:

My son can't either and he's in high school.... BUT... I have him carry it anyway .



 


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Roxygurl
by Emerald Member on Sep. 5, 2013 at 4:03 PM
You realize though if he gets caught with it in his backpack they will more than likely suspend him?

Please don't quote me if you're you g to say something like I don't give a fuck if my kid is suspended his life is more important that a suspension. I wasn't trying to dissuade the op I was simply bringing it to her attention that if e was caught with it they will suspend him because I didn't know if she knew that or not.


Quoting Anonymous:

 How do you do that?


The forms have you mark if he has asthma & if he needs an inhaler.  Do you just not send one in?




Quoting conniejo75:

My son can't either and he's in high school.... BUT... I have him carry it anyway .



 

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Sep. 5, 2013 at 4:03 PM
1 mom liked this

 I just got a special note from the Dr so he could carry cough drops w/him.  Ridiculous.

I get some kids are stupid, but honestly I'm tired of rules that hinder the majority.  It isn't ok.

Those kids should've been in a world of trouble, the mother of the child passing around his inhaler should've whooped his butt (yeah I'm sure I'll catch hell for that comment).  Those kids should be cracked down on, you don't make rules hindering everyone else.

Quoting mistie900:

I think it's dumb too but I see why they do it. I remember hearing about boys in school using inhalers in the locker room trying to get high. At our school you could not carry any medicine at all and you had to go to the office if you wanted a cough drop.


 

tracy0812
by Silver Member on Sep. 5, 2013 at 4:03 PM
Same with my son's inhaler. It is to be kept in the nurses office and if it is needed, he has to go there to use it. The nurses office is on the other side of the school!
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