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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Applicants for my Rental Home- Rant

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

WHY do people not read the ad in its entirety and only respond if appropriate?

If the ad says no pets, then NO, your pet is not an exclusion. 

If the ad says $1,000 per month, don't waste my time by responding and then tell me that you can only pay $700 per month.  You are out of your price range. 

If the ad says a certain amount of income is required, normally 3 times the monthly rental amount (or 4 times rent if you have a lot of debt), do not assume that this does not apply to you. 

If the ad says 1200 square feet, NO, you and your brother and 19 other people cannot move in.

No criminal history means NO criminal history.  Your little robbery a couple years back is not ok.

If the ad says good credit, and you are in massive debt, behind on payments and being evicted, no, I'm not advertising to you. 

I go through all this every single time.  Fortunately, I now weed them out by email instead of wasting a bunch of my time running around.  Much better.  But still.   

Posted by Anonymous on Sep. 15, 2013 at 2:09 PM
Replies (141-149):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 8 on Sep. 15, 2013 at 4:52 PM
Thanks! We currently rent a beautiful home. I do wish the rent was a little less. LOL. We went from $700 a month in one state and pay $1200 now, plus lost my income. LOL

Quoting Anonymous:

 I will rent to you!  ;)


Quoting Anonymous:

Not always. We have high income, great credit and rent. We have to have the ability to move with very little notice with Dh's job. Buying does not make sense for us right now


Quoting Anonymous:


People with high incomes and good credit buy their own houses.  Just sayin'


 

RUMyMummy
by Bronze Member on Sep. 15, 2013 at 5:50 PM
I get why it's all annoying but unfortunately there are enough landlords out there who does things like say "No Pets!" and then make allowances that the ones who actually mean who they say are getting crappy responses. Sorry you're frustrated.
MDWife12
by on Sep. 15, 2013 at 10:43 PM

 Landlords lose a lot of money when their property sits empty. We want them to be rented. I can't speak for your landlord but there are reasons we do non renewals. One of them would be if you have had too many infractions or can't pay rent ontime! But like I said I can't speak for your landlord.

Quoting Anonymous:

I'm curious, if from a landlord's perspective, you could share with me why something happened with my last rental. I loved that house like it was my own. We didn't damage it. We lost a huge chunk of the security deposit, but that was fine because they's pretty normal around here. (Like $80 because there were ants in  the yard. In Florida. I honestly thought they should take up that issue with their pest control company, but it was fine. All landlords around here do those things.) My big issue was that our lease was not extended. I would have loved to have continued living there. We love the neighborhood, so we moved into a house across the street that was for rent. Now the house we lived in has been vacant since March 1st. Why would a landlord prefer having a home vacant for over six months to having tenants continue to live there? It was for rent at a very competitive price for the area before we moved into it, and I was told it was because it had already been on the market for four months by that point. So, since December 2011, it's only been rented for 11.75 months. Why would a landlord decide to do that? Is there any benefit to having a vacant home?

 

MDWife12
by on Sep. 15, 2013 at 10:51 PM

 False. I see this on a daily basis. Not everyone with high incomes and good credit want to buy their own homes :)

Quoting Anonymous:

People with high incomes and good credit buy their own houses.  Just sayin'

 

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Sep. 16, 2013 at 1:26 AM

 It depends on why there is bad credit.  I did take a chance on one couple who had bad credit because of a business failure that I could verify.  They have been great tenants for years. 

I would take someone with good references who was behind on some major medical bills.

What I will not accept is late pays or charge-off on utilities, credit cards or loans without a serious, verifiable reason like medical problems. 

I run the other way if they say they have bad credit "because of a divorce".  No, you have bad credit because you do not pay your bills.  People who have divorced still pay their bills.  I had a tenant divorce and I never knew it.  He did not take his problem and make it my problem.   

Quoting Lordgodempress:

I do have a question, just because I am curious would you be willing to accept people with excellent rental history with bad credit?  I have bad credit because of some life circumstances but my rent has always been paid on time and we have excellent references from previous landlords.  We are not in the market for a rental right now and hope to be buying a house in the next year, I am just curious.

 

2Percent
by Member on Sep. 16, 2013 at 3:47 AM
I do not the best credit but ive always paid rent and utilities on time... I just turned 30 and im still paying for me being 18-21 and maxing out all my credit cards I had at the time and paid min... ive now grown up and have 2 kids with my boyfriend of 6 years.. we just moved into a very nice house with a letter from my employer whom just happens to be an attorney... just before I started working wwith him 4byears ago, I setup payment arrangements with all my old creditors not knowing if I paid them it would hurt my credit for another 7 years... the attorney I work for informed me the creditor can report for 7 years after last payment/contact..
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Sep. 16, 2013 at 4:56 PM

 Thank you for paying your debts off instead of just ditching them, raising costs and scrutiny for all of us. 

Quoting 2Percent:

I do not the best credit but ive always paid rent and utilities on time... I just turned 30 and im still paying for me being 18-21 and maxing out all my credit cards I had at the time and paid min... ive now grown up and have 2 kids with my boyfriend of 6 years.. we just moved into a very nice house with a letter from my employer whom just happens to be an attorney... just before I started working wwith him 4byears ago, I setup payment arrangements with all my old creditors not knowing if I paid them it would hurt my credit for another 7 years... the attorney I work for informed me the creditor can report for 7 years after last payment/contact..

 

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Sep. 16, 2013 at 5:02 PM

The initial batch of applicants (assuming truthfulness - we will not be proceeding to the verification):

1.  Good credit and stable employment.  But "Oh, I have a cat (ad said no pets) and by the way, I can't afford your rent - can you knock off several hundred dollars for me since I am a good tenant?"  

[NO. I don't even know you.  You have not earned the right to negotiate with me, as a long term tenant would have done.]

2.  Answers no questions whatsoever and gives no information except (and I quote the errors): " I wnt to move in at the end of the mont here is my phone number XXX-xxx-xxxx"

[The ad said it would not be available until November!]

3.  "Here's my phone number XXX-xxx-xxxx.  call me"

[The ad requested some specific information about when and why you are moving and also stated that incomplete replies would not get any response.]

4.  "Can you cut your rent $200 and let me sublet it for you, saving you the hassle of management?"

[No, spammer...go away!]

Not much luck on the first advertisement.  It is sad how few can read and follow directions but it does help weed out people I do not want.

 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 22 on Sep. 25, 2013 at 8:37 PM

We paid on time. Someone else said that it might be for sale, and they wanted it free of tenants to show. I was curious, so I looked online and it was sold three months after we moved out. It's now for rent, but the new owners raised the price we had been paying by $300 a month.

Quoting MDWife12:

 Landlords lose a lot of money when their property sits empty. We want them to be rented. I can't speak for your landlord but there are reasons we do non renewals. One of them would be if you have had too many infractions or can't pay rent ontime! But like I said I can't speak for your landlord.

Quoting Anonymous:

I'm curious, if from a landlord's perspective, you could share with me why something happened with my last rental. I loved that house like it was my own. We didn't damage it. We lost a huge chunk of the security deposit, but that was fine because they's pretty normal around here. (Like $80 because there were ants in  the yard. In Florida. I honestly thought they should take up that issue with their pest control company, but it was fine. All landlords around here do those things.) My big issue was that our lease was not extended. I would have loved to have continued living there. We love the neighborhood, so we moved into a house across the street that was for rent. Now the house we lived in has been vacant since March 1st. Why would a landlord prefer having a home vacant for over six months to having tenants continue to live there? It was for rent at a very competitive price for the area before we moved into it, and I was told it was because it had already been on the market for four months by that point. So, since December 2011, it's only been rented for 11.75 months. Why would a landlord decide to do that? Is there any benefit to having a vacant home?

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