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valentine Rd./ child murder/Religion/..

Posted by on Oct. 9, 2013 at 11:25 PM
  • 20 Replies
Has anyone seen the documentary "Valentine Road" ( HBO) ?

Or follow the story of 14year old Larry King being shot twice in the head by a school mate because he cross dressed , asked the boy to be his valentine and said he want to be called by a female name.this was in Ca.

Anyone ? I am so outraged over so many comments made by school employees , educaters , jury members etc.. I'm disgusted and shocked! The victim blaming and saying the dead boy will go to hell because he wore woman's boots ..ugh !!!

Below is an article about the movie in case you have no idea what I am talking about ;


*************


documentary Valentine Road, which premiered at Sundance in January, takes on a 2008 school shooting in the small town of Oxnard, California. The victim, Lawrence “Larry” King, is an openly transgendered, mixed race, 15-year-old boy who had been in and out of foster care and group homes most of his life. The 14-year-old perpetrator, Brandon McInerney, also endured a traumatic childhood and had joined a neo-Nazi gang just prior to the attack. He’s currently serving a 21-year prison sentence.

The film hinges on intimate interviews conducted by Cunningham. She respects her subjects, and they respond by opening up about their emotions and memories with heart-wrenching detail. Cunningham’s greatest strength lies in her ability to present both victim and perpetrator as sympathetic children. Like any real tragedy, Larry’s murder and the events around it are rife with injustice, prejudice, fear, loneliness, misunderstandings and missed prevention opportunities.

There’s little disagreement as to the day’s events. Multiple students witnessed Brandon fatally shoot Larry at close range in the school’s computer lab. He was apprehended by police near the school shortly thereafter. But Cunningham has her work cut out for her as she explores the causes, motivations, mistakes, and, most significantly, the blame surrounding this horrific crime.


who loved Larry, the teacher who encouraged him to embrace his transsexual identity, the attorneys emotionally and financially invested in the movement to stop minors from being tried as adults, Brandon’s broken family members and his devoted girlfriend, school administrators who botched any opportunities for healing or change, and, most damningly, the Christian members of the community who believed that Larry was “asking for it.”

The film is full of such comments. One of the teachers at Oxnard’s E.O. Green Junior High School says that Larry was inviting mistreatment when he was open about his sexuality and calmly surmises that he is probably “in hell” now. A handful of other teachers pronounce similar judgments on the victim and those who’d attempted to support him. Of course, Larry wouldn’t have been served well if the adults around him had failed to warn him that he might encounter violence in the world, but it’s unnerving to hear average adult Americans—teachers, parents, community members—imply that a young teenager deserved his own murder.

Why was Larry’s life any less sacred than the unborn whose lives many Christians fight to protect? It seems that the Christians interviewed in Valentine Road deem Larry’s life less valuable—and his death at least explainable—because he identified as transgender and was open about it. But no matter what one’s views on sexuality are, Larry was a human being. All humans are valuable, especially for those who believe that all humans are created in God’s image. That belief is fundamental to the conviction that all human life is inherently worth protecting.

Cunningham is to be commended for piecing together a chilling and complex story that required years of her attention as a filmmaker, and especially for her ability to remain calm while talking to people who almost certainly offended her own liberal convictions. Still, I wonder why more Christian filmmakers aren’t drawn to these issues. I imagine it is because a director must feel a deep sympathy for the subject with such a film, and perhaps some or even many Christians lack that depth of sympathy when it comes to people who identify as anything other than heterosexual.

Christians are called to protect those that are weak, ostracized, alien or victimized. I think of the many social outcasts who found refuge and belonging in the presence of Christ, and I wonder who those people are today. Who are the “tax collectors and prostitutes” of the contemporary world? I imagine they would be anyone society has written off, anyone we would generally think of as worthless or beyond hope. I’m not assuming a particular conclusion about the Bible’s teaching on homosexuality, but simply pointing out that violation of the sixth commandment, “Thou shalt not kill,” should be at least as upsetting to Christians as seemingly wrong sexual identity choices. Whether or not we think of homosexuality as acceptable, we should feel sympathy toward those among us facing bigotry or threats on their lives.

This is compounded by the fact that our culture generally lacks the courage to take a stand on anything. On the other end of the spectrum from the damning conservative Christian is the open-minded liberal who endeavors to treat all voices and opinions as equal. Valentine Road does exactly that, showing us how both Larry and Brandon were victims of childhood abuse, how the adults around them failed to protect them, how unloved and isolated they had been. Larry is portrayed as having been a free spirit, a person who had come to terms with who he was and was openly exploring what that would mean for him in the world. Brandon is a tortured and confused youth, loved by his devoted girlfriend but scarred by a traumatic childhood and misled by neo-Nazi gang members, who is being tried as an adult for a crime he committed right after his 14th birthday.

While it’s evident that both the crime and the response to the crime were a mess, Cunningham fails to bring Valentine Road to an appropriate conclusion. Instead she leaves the audience in artful ambiguity. Is it right or wrong to try a child for murder? Were the adults in Larry’s life protecting him sufficiently from the discrimination he would face? Why had no one noticed Brandon’s burgeoning neo-Nazi fascination and realized violence was brewing? Cunningham fails to take on these big questions. She falls into the postmodern trap of raising questions and then standing back with an all-knowing look and declaring “but there are no right answers.”

This is not to say a film can’t revel in telling ambiguities. But I think there is a right answer to whether or not a minor should be tried as an adult. The answer is no. There is also a right way to honor young Lawrence King’s memory. While candlelight vigils may comfort his friends, they do not address the source of the problem. Teachers and parents in small-town America need to face the hatred that they have tolerated for too long and take some adult measures to prevent emotionally disturbed children from walking around with guns.

Link -- http://www.curatormagazine.com/sarahhanssen/valentine-road-a-moral-tale/

by on Oct. 9, 2013 at 11:25 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Mackenzie40
by Ruby Member on Oct. 9, 2013 at 11:27 PM
Anyone
Mackenzie40
by Ruby Member on Oct. 9, 2013 at 11:42 PM
Bump
csxt99
by Jennifer on Oct. 10, 2013 at 3:02 AM

I have never seen the HBO documentary, but I do know the story.  I think it's a giant clusterfuck of wrong on so many levels.  The kid did not deserve to die because he was transgendered and asked a boy to be his Valentine.  Considering the comments made by the adults in the area, I am not in the least bit surprised that the perpetrator thought it was okay to kill the boy.  It sounds very similar to honor killings, which are also ridiculous situations.  The teacher who tried to help Larry has since quit teaching.  She couldn't handle the boy's death and the blame she got for it, which I also find to be another major loss.  She was a teacher who cared and tried to help, and it backfired in a horrible manner.

EntrepeneurMom
by The Major on Oct. 10, 2013 at 3:10 AM
3 moms liked this
I am a progressive Christian. I'm sick of being made to feel like I'm not a "real" Christian because I choose to support love and freedom instead of hate. Nowhere in the bible does it tell us to actively condemn and hurt others. The God I know loves us all equally. Yet I feel like I'm losing a battle. In my lifetime, I've met only a handful of Christians who weren't hateful to those of a different color, gender, sexuality or religion. I keep telling myself these people are not the face of God but sometimes I can't help but doubt myself, and wonder if I have the entire religion wrong.
Mackenzie40
by Ruby Member on Oct. 10, 2013 at 11:56 AM
Yeah she's now working at a Starbucks . I don't understand why she doesn't teach at a different school. She seemed like a great teacher ..supportive , kind ,empathetic. The other adults including special Ed teachers and counselors made almost unbelievable comments. Completely blamining the victim. It was shocking to me how many people had a problem with this little boys self expression. I didn't realize how prominent these views could be in a school district still. The jury also. The one jury all ended up wearing bracelets to support the shooter ,and most of them were educated people. I was pretty floored.

Quoting csxt99:

I have never seen the HBO documentary, but I do know the story.  I think it's a giant clusterfuck of wrong on so many levels.  The kid did not deserve to die because he was transgendered and asked a boy to be his Valentine.  Considering the comments made by the adults in the area, I am not in the least bit surprised that the perpetrator thought it was okay to kill the boy.  It sounds very similar to honor killings, which are also ridiculous situations.  The teacher who tried to help Larry has since quit teaching.  She couldn't handle the boy's death and the blame she got for it, which I also find to be another major loss.  She was a teacher who cared and tried to help, and it backfired in a horrible manner.

Mackenzie40
by Ruby Member on Oct. 10, 2013 at 11:58 AM
For what iys worth I think you're the one who has it right !!

Quoting EntrepeneurMom:

I am a progressive Christian. I'm sick of being made to feel like I'm not a "real" Christian because I choose to support love and freedom instead of hate. Nowhere in the bible does it tell us to actively condemn and hurt others. The God I know loves us all equally. Yet I feel like I'm losing a battle. In my lifetime, I've met only a handful of Christians who weren't hateful to those of a different color, gender, sexuality or religion. I keep telling myself these people are not the face of God but sometimes I can't help but doubt myself, and wonder if I have the entire religion wrong.
chicklopez
by ItsFunnierInEnochian on Oct. 10, 2013 at 12:09 PM

 It's sad that a community like the one featured, exists. To say a child, teenager, adult, anyone deserved to be murdered and is probably in hell, because they are transgendered... It just hurts to know there are still people like this in the world...

I feel scared for my ODS. He loves to wear his sister's princess outfits. He loves to play with her barbies, and baby dolls. He also loves to steal my makeup, and put on princess shoes. But at the same time, he loves trucks, and ninja turtles.  We caught him staring at a woman in the store the other day, and when we told him it wasnt polite to stare, he simply said, She's so pretty!

Im not concerned with what gender my son gravitates to, Im afraid of what bigots and close-minded people will do to him if he does turn out to like the same sex.

EntrepeneurMom
by The Major on Oct. 10, 2013 at 12:14 PM
I hope I'm not wrong, put it that way.


Quoting Mackenzie40:

For what iys worth I think you're the one who has it right !!



Quoting EntrepeneurMom:

I am a progressive Christian. I'm sick of being made to feel like I'm not a "real" Christian because I choose to support love and freedom instead of hate. Nowhere in the bible does it tell us to actively condemn and hurt others. The God I know loves us all equally. Yet I feel like I'm losing a battle. In my lifetime, I've met only a handful of Christians who weren't hateful to those of a different color, gender, sexuality or religion. I keep telling myself these people are not the face of God but sometimes I can't help but doubt myself, and wonder if I have the entire religion wrong.

Mackenzie40
by Ruby Member on Oct. 10, 2013 at 12:26 PM
I can understand what you're afraid of . Who could blame you? When being seen as "different" can get you picked on , beaten or even killed. Very scary. I would watch how he was being treated in the school community and would be ready to take action if needed. I hope he doesn't face cruelty :( .. its a good thing he has a great mom !!

Quoting chicklopez:

 It's sad that a community like the one featured, exists. To say a child, teenager, adult, anyone deserved to be murdered and is probably in hell, because they are transgendered... It just hurts to know there are still people like this in the world...


I feel scared for my ODS. He loves to wear his sister's princess outfits. He loves to play with her barbies, and baby dolls. He also loves to steal my makeup, and put on princess shoes. But at the same time, he loves trucks, and ninja turtles.  We caught him staring at a woman in the store the other day, and when we told him it wasnt polite to stare, he simply said, She's so pretty!


Im not concerned with what gender my son gravitates to, Im afraid of what bigots and close-minded people will do to him if he does turn out to like the same sex.

Mackenzie40
by Ruby Member on Oct. 10, 2013 at 1:14 PM
How could you be? That school district was full of people that used their faith as an excuse to be judgemental and cruel . That's what the adults there modeled for their children , that's the attitude that had a fourteen year old believing he was justified in killing another person. I can't imagine a loving God would want anyone to pass around such a destructive attitude and outlook in his name.

Personally I don't have a belief in a God but many of my friends and family do and their belief is that God wants us to be empathetic , kind , loving to each other. Accepting a person as they are is what we should do , at least that's what I believe. I hope people treat me with acceptance and so that's how I treat others .. So do you think its possible that God wants you to not show all people acceptance ? Do you believe that bigots might be right??


Quoting EntrepeneurMom:

I hope I'm not wrong, put it that way.




Quoting Mackenzie40:

For what iys worth I think you're the one who has it right !!





Quoting EntrepeneurMom:

I am a progressive Christian. I'm sick of being made to feel like I'm not a "real" Christian because I choose to support love and freedom instead of hate. Nowhere in the bible does it tell us to actively condemn and hurt others. The God I know loves us all equally. Yet I feel like I'm losing a battle. In my lifetime, I've met only a handful of Christians who weren't hateful to those of a different color, gender, sexuality or religion. I keep telling myself these people are not the face of God but sometimes I can't help but doubt myself, and wonder if I have the entire religion wrong.

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