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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

striving for mediocrity

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 63 Replies
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I find it so sad that this generation has a large focus on being "average" or just not striving for something better.

I see it too often: let them be kids. They're too young to learn that. I'm not worried about teaching them letters/ colors/ etc at a young age. Just let them play.

Parents don't have to force their young children to sit in workbooks at a young age in order to teach them, either.

It is possible to do both! Teach them while they play. Feed them knowledge while their brains are absorbing absolutely everything. Don't pressure them to learn, but don't hold back information just because they're "too young"

I want more for my children. I want them to think critically and embrace learning. Our activities are always fun, and people are shocked with how much they know. Sometimes they surprise me, too!

For those with toddlers: Do you teach through play? Or do you not teach at all?
Posted by Anonymous on Nov. 3, 2013 at 4:47 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Nov. 3, 2013 at 4:53 AM
Bump.
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:02 AM
Bump....
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:02 AM
1 mom liked this
I think its pretty rare that the age you learned to count and recognize colors has any impact on your life as an adult lol. Who cares when someone teaches their kid the basics? That doesn't indicate whether they'll be mediocre or not
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:02 AM
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I absolutely do! I have a two year old, my first. We constantly learn during play. I have wooden puzzles that teach letters, numbers, colors.. We play with those almost daily and I talk about what everything is while we are playing. We have a dozen board books with learning activities. One for example has pictures of certain things on the left page like a tree, dog, cat, hairbrush, sun, etc. Then on the right page is has everything hidden into a scenery. I will ask him to find each object.
Another activity we do is I have an elmo book attached to one of those magnet boards with the pencil. I will go through the numbers with him and shapes, then help him draw them.
Sometimes I just hide objects around the house then ask "where is mommas..." then we look for it.

Sometimes I will go through a book of animals and asks him what noises they make. He only knows a few of those so far.. But we do a bunch of learning games. He also has time to just play with his trains or balls without having to think. I like him to get time away from that as well!
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:09 AM
Finding joy in learning and accomplishments at an early age will absolutely help them later in life. How would it help to suddenly be forced into a classroom with no previous knowledge or experience? I think it matters. Our public schools are failing... and I think a lot of parents aren't seeing their role in that. (I don't think one particular party is at fault)

Quoting Anonymous:

I think its pretty rare that the age you learned to count and recognize colors has any impact on your life as an adult lol. Who cares when someone teaches their kid the basics? That doesn't indicate whether they'll be mediocre or not
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:12 AM
1 mom liked this
That's great! My children love puzzles. I point out a lot of things as we use or see them. When they take a crayon, I say the color (until they know it on their own.). We count things often, and they soon started counting on their own. Animals, tools, etc- they just soak it up! :)

Quoting Anonymous:

I absolutely do! I have a two year old, my first. We constantly learn during play. I have wooden puzzles that teach letters, numbers, colors.. We play with those almost daily and I talk about what everything is while we are playing. We have a dozen board books with learning activities. One for example has pictures of certain things on the left page like a tree, dog, cat, hairbrush, sun, etc. Then on the right page is has everything hidden into a scenery. I will ask him to find each object.

Another activity we do is I have an elmo book attached to one of those magnet boards with the pencil. I will go through the numbers with him and shapes, then help him draw them.

Sometimes I just hide objects around the house then ask "where is mommas..." then we look for it.



Sometimes I will go through a book of animals and asks him what noises they make. He only knows a few of those so far.. But we do a bunch of learning games. He also has time to just play with his trains or balls without having to think. I like him to get time away from that as well!

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:16 AM
1 mom liked this
Toddlers understand more than what most give them credit for...
Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:17 AM

Keep em away from the television at least until they are past the age of 3, and that alone will do wonders for brain development.  I side with the American Academy of Pediatrics on this one.  My son is 6 and I still don't let him watch much television....nor will we give him video games....ever!  LOL

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:22 AM
1 mom liked this
I let my children watch very little television. They love Sid the Science Kid. My oldest son has a tablet, but the only games are educational ones. Still, they spend more time with books and crafts than screens.

Quoting Anonymous:

Keep em away from the television at least until they are past the age of 3, and that alone will do wonders for brain development.  I side with the American Academy of Pediatrics on this one.  My son is 6 and I still don't let him watch much television....nor will we give him video games....ever!  LOL

justpeachy71904
by peachy on Nov. 3, 2013 at 5:26 AM
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When my dd was a toddler I thought her all the time.

I was poor but I hand made flash cards. I couldn't afford to buy them. I drew numbers on one side and shapes on one side, animals, etc...

I had a friend give us tons of books. We read day in and out. That didn't really help.my kid hates reading still.

as I became more stable and was able to invest in toys I only bought educational. I wanted to make sure she could read and write. Going into preschool she was reading and writing above her classmates


I have always had high expectations for my child. I dont see anything wrong with it.
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