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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Every kid does not have some kind of processing disorder. Ffs

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
A girl on my fb just posted that she thought that her ds may have sensory processing disorder because he hates having his hands dirty. Wtf?!?

He's almost 2. O.o

It is so annoying to me to see people say that their kids have spd, ofh, oddes, hhhdj, hent etc. (made up abbreviations)

Why can't people just realize that everything doesn't have to be a disorder.

Now I know that some kids truely do have disorders, but I feel like they are WAAAAY over diagnosed.

my kid picks his nose, I think he has something. *eyeroll*
Posted by Anonymous on Nov. 10, 2013 at 6:58 PM
Replies (161-164):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 34 on Nov. 12, 2013 at 7:37 AM

My neighbor across the road has 3 boys who have Autism.  They are fighting to get SSI for the kids.  Personally, I think that the 2 younger ones are just assholes like their father.  The oldest one (who has a different father) is just odd.  


Quoting susannah2000:

I couldn't agree more. It's like every kid in the freaking country has to have autism or Asperger's. I am so sick of hearing about people's little snowflakes who the whole world has to revolve around. I am sick of even hearing the names. It's a pathology, this need to jump on the autism bandwagon and get that diagnosis, whether the diagnosis is correct or not. Doctors have diagnosed any number of conditions as autism for  forty years, and now they have just decided, "the hell with it, EVERYONE's autistic!" If a person is a little socially unsure, they MUST have Asperger's. If kids don't like to sit still, they MUST have ADD. If a kid doesn't like crowds, or doing what they are told, they MUST be autistic.


susannah2000
by Platinum Member on Nov. 12, 2013 at 8:29 AM


Quoting Anonymous:

It is fine if you want to talk more.  The beauty of online communication is if it becomes too much, I can walk away and the question will still be there when I'm ready to address it. I find that many people don't understand Aspergers, and I don't mind sharing information.


Quoting susannah2000:
























I have never talked with anyone with Asperger's and have found this very interesting and educational. I'd like to talk more but don't want to stress you out.





Like I said, I have never talked with anyone with Asperger's before. I think what you said about everyone having quirks and little weird things that they do, but the difference being the impact on one's life that they have for people with Asperger's, makes alot of sense. I can understand the similarity, possibly, to OCD. I have also heard, but I don't know if it is true, that people with Asperger's have it difficult forming emotional attachments with people and also day inappropriate things in conversations. You described how difficult it is to follow a conversation and try to organize your thoughts to add, but that is not the same thing as being inappropriate or out there. Is there alot of misinformation out there about it? When and how were you diagnosed? Is there medication that helps?

ProudMommaBear
by on Nov. 12, 2013 at 8:32 AM
This is what happens when people turn to the internet for medical things...
Anonymous
by Anonymous 19 on Nov. 12, 2013 at 9:31 AM

I don't really think the problem is misinformation exactly just stereotypes.  Most of the people I know only know about Aspergers through exposure to characters on TV.  As we all know, characters on TV are purposefully over the top and dramatic.

 I will be the first to admit that I was an obnoxious child.  I thought I was smarter than everyone else. I was constantly correcting people and rambling on and on about the books that I was reading and the facts that I knew.  (I still do the rambling a bit.) What most TV shows fail to acknowledge is that we grow up.  I've seen several parents say that their kids act just like Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory.  Most of the parents that I've seen say this had kids less than 10.  Most people with Aspergers do learn some semblance of social rules. We know that calling someone fat isn't appropriate by adulthood. Simple things like that we do learn over time. Most of the adults with Aspergers that I know can detect most sarcasm.

A good example of a person with Aspergers is Max from Parenthood. He has actually grown and developed and his understanding of social situations has changed with him.

Now, I still do socially inappropriate things, but they are not as overtly wrong to me.  I do not read body language and situations well so I may react in a way that doesn't quite fit the situation.  I've said that I cannot determine my own emotions well, and I'm even worse at determining someone else's emotions. Things like crying I get, but the more subtle indicators of emotions are usually lost on me. I sometimes overreact, sometimes underreact, sometimes there is no reaction at all when I should have reacted.  My husband who is really good at reading people cannot read me.  He says my tone, inflection, and body language are all off.  I do not have a southern accent despite having lived in the southern U.S. my entire life; my younger brother has quite the accent as do my parents, but I do not.

As far as having difficulty forming emotional attachments, I don't think that is exactly accurate. I think what we (at least I do) have issues with is expressing those attachments in a way that other people can understand. There was a point in our marriage where my husband didn't think that I cared about him at all. Emotions are hard for me to process and understand, but I still have them. This trouble in our marriage is actually what led up to my diagnosis.

He was actually the first to suspect that I might have Aspergers. In all honesty, I actually scheduled the evaluation originally to prove to him that I was in fact normal, and he was being ridiculous.  Well, clearly it didn't go that way.  I was evaluated in February of this year by a clinical psychologist at a local university.

There is no medication for Aspergers.  Many people with Aspergers have problems with depression and anxiety.  I've never had any issues with depression.  I probably could have used some anxiety medication when I was working; however, I was not diagnosed at that time.  I now stay home and since I'm in control of most situations that anxiety isn't an issue.


Quoting susannah2000:


Quoting Anonymous:

It is fine if you want to talk more.  The beauty of online communication is if it becomes too much, I can walk away and the question will still be there when I'm ready to address it. I find that many people don't understand Aspergers, and I don't mind sharing information.


Quoting susannah2000:
























I have never talked with anyone with Asperger's and have found this very interesting and educational. I'd like to talk more but don't want to stress you out.





Like I said, I have never talked with anyone with Asperger's before. I think what you said about everyone having quirks and little weird things that they do, but the difference being the impact on one's life that they have for people with Asperger's, makes alot of sense. I can understand the similarity, possibly, to OCD. I have also heard, but I don't know if it is true, that people with Asperger's have it difficult forming emotional attachments with people and also day inappropriate things in conversations. You described how difficult it is to follow a conversation and try to organize your thoughts to add, but that is not the same thing as being inappropriate or out there. Is there alot of misinformation out there about it? When and how were you diagnosed? Is there medication that helps?



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