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Adults should have a breeding limit

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

It is reported that the UK government-sponsored Sustainable Development Commission believes that curbing people‚Äôs right to reproduce should be central to the fight against global warming (1).  Jonathon Porritt, who chairs the commission and is also a patron of the Malthusian campaigning group the Optimum Population Trust, wants to turn population control into the key objective of environmental campaigning. So the totalitarian impulse towards controlling people‚Äôs reproductive lives has now received the blessing of sections of the British political elite.

Porritt’s estrangement from the newborn puts him in the company of a growing band of dreary misanthropists. King Herod’s fear of the newborn was confined to one baby. Today’s misanthropic fear-merchants have a wider target. One Australian professor of obstetric medicine, Barry Walters, believes that the very survival of the planet demands stringent controls on the number of children parents can have. This is what he has to say:

‚ÄėAnthropogenic greenhouse gases constitute the largest source of pollution, with by far the greatest contribution from humans in the developed world. Every newborn baby in Australia represents a potent source of greenhouse gas emissions for an average of 80 years, not simply by breathing, but by the profligate consumption of resources typical of our society. What then should we do as environmentally responsible medical practitioners? We should point out the consequences to all who fail to see them, including, if necessary, the ministers for health. Far from showering financial booty on new mothers and thereby rewarding greenhouse-unfriendly behaviour, a ‚ÄúBaby Levy‚ÄĚ in the form of a carbon tax should apply, in line with the ‚Äúpolluter pays‚ÄĚ principle.‚Äô (2)

Throughout history, different cultures have celebrated birth as a unique moment signifying the joy of life. The reinterpretation of birth as a form of ‚Äėgreenhouse-unfriendly behaviour‚Äô speaks to today‚Äôs degraded imagination, where carbon-reduction becomes the supreme moral imperative. Once every newborn baby is dehumanised in this way, represented as a professional polluter who is a ‚Äėpotent source of greenhouse gas emissions‚Äô, then it becomes increasingly difficult to feel anything other than apprehension about the growth of the human race.

Posted by Anonymous on Nov. 17, 2013 at 3:57 AM
Replies (41-50):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 12 on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:04 PM
1 mom liked this
Anecdotal. Your situation does not necessarily speak for the populace.

Fact: we're using our resources at an alarming rate.


Quoting jen2150:

If we have too many people please explain why I can live on 40 acres by myself. People that go hungry is more of a fact of government control. You really need to educate yourself. This is not the first time this idea has come up. People should always have the freedom to have as many kids as they can afford. I personally have two kids because it is what I can afford. Others are able to afford more. The important part is not how many kids you have but raising responsible adults that will benefit society.




Quoting GaleJ:

WE HAVE TOO MANY PEOPLE AND NOT ENOUGH RESOURCES!!! It really is that simple and America uses resources and produces garbage completely out of proportion to our population. There can be reasonable and voluntary population control now or great suffering down the line, to deny that is to condemn the generations that follow us.






Quoting jen2150:

The planet is not over populated. Cities but not the planet. No one has a right to tell you how many kids you should have. The UK governmwnt is a highly intrusive government and their citizens have few rights. So glad my country's fore fathers saw them for what they were. Population control has nothing to do with resources. It is just another way of exerting control.



Anonymous
by Anonymous 12 on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:09 PM
Unfortunately, it usually works the exact opposite.


Quoting Anonymous:

I think and "breeding" limit should be tied to intelligence. The smarter you are the more kids you should be encouraged to have.

AutymsMommy
by Platinum Member on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:13 PM
1 mom liked this

Trying to implement this in a country like the United States would require overturning basic religious freedoms. I'm Catholic - our faith dictates we do not use birth control measures and only use NFP in extreme circumstances, barring medical reasons. You wouldn't just be able to say "okay, we have a population issue, now we're placing a limit on how many children you can have!" - the rights we have in this country would, essentially, have to be completely obliterated.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff:  we're Catholic, we're conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee















Melissa_4
by Ruby Member on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:15 PM

Um, the birth rate in the US is the lowest it's ever been.  

With humanity's numbers expected to hit 7 billion by 2012, countries around the world are trying to address overpopulation and overcrowding. But some nations are struggling with the opposite problem: low birthrates. For example, Japan's government is so worried about its birthrate that it cheered recent news about a slight increase in fertility‚ÄĒa June report stated that married couples had an average of 1.37 kids in 2008, up from 1.34 in 2007.

This slight increase didn't help Japan much; it still has the second-lowest birthrate in the world, after Hong Kong. They aren't the only places worrying about low birthrates. Austria, Germany, Greece, and Italy all face this problem, and their governments are taking different steps to deal with it. This pressing challenge is having enormous effects economically and culturally.

Here's BusinessWeek's list of the countries with birthrates that are too low to fully replace their populations.

Ukraine

9.8 births per 1,000 people

Population: 45,700,395
Urban Population: 68% of total
GDP per capita: $6,900
Unemployment: 6.8%
Women as % of Workforce: 49.3

Ukraine's population dilemma is one of the most urgent in the world. The country must contend not only with its birthrate, which has fallen sharply since it declared independence from Russia in 1991, but also with a fast-growing HIV/AIDS epidemic and high mortality rates from smoking and drinking. In March 2009, Ukraine's government pledged to reform the health-care system by creating a national network of family doctors and by making improvements in emergency medical services.

Switzerland

9.59 births per 1,000 people

Population: 7,604,467
Urban Population: 73%
GDP per capita: $40,900
Unemployment: 3.9%
Women as % of Workforce: 45.8

Switzerland's low birthrate doesn't seem to be related to its economy. Although the country's gross domestic product is expected to fall 2.5% to 3% this year, Switzerland's finances remain relatively healthy overall. The low birthrate may be partly due to women finding it difficult to juggle career obligations with raising a family. For example, unlike other European countries such as Sweden, Switzerland did not have laws mandating paid maternity leave until 2004.

Bulgaria

9.51 births per 1,000 people

Population: 7,204,687
Urban Population: 71%
GDP per capita: $12,900
Unemployment: 8.9%
Women as % of Workforce: 46.2

Bulgaria's government has been trying to stem the dwindling of its population for years, encouraging parents to have more children, but many couples find they cannot afford to have more than one. Many Bulgarians continue to seek work opportunities abroad. As the country inches toward membership in the European Union, the shrinking population will have an enormous impact on Bulgaria's ability to grow economically.

Hungary

9.51 births per 1,000 people

Population: 6,962,845
Urban Population: 68%
GDP per capita: $19,800
Unemployment: 7.4%
Women as % of Workforce: 45.2

Like Bulgaria, Hungary has seen many of its citizens leave the country to find work elsewhere. This factor, along with falling marriage rates, has caused Hungary's birthrate to drop to its low level.

Greece

9.45 births per 1,000 people

Population: 10,737,428
Urban Population: 61%
GDP per capita: $32,000
Unemployment: 9.0%
Women as % of Workforce: 40.4

What's behind Greece's low birthrate? A number of factors. A troubled economy could be one, but the birthrate has been declining for years. Analysts believe that greater choices for women, including better access to contraception and abortion services, played a major role in forcing down the birthrate. As in Hong Kong, Japan, and Taiwan, the government is trying to stem the population decline, but it is focusing more on trying to attract Greek expatriates back to the country.

Serbia

9.19 births per 1,000 people

Population: 7,379,339
Urban Population: 52%
GDP per capita: $10,900
Unemployment: 18.8%
Women as % of Workforce: 42

During the 1990s, when Serbia was involved in armed conflicts in Bosnia, Croatia, and Kosovo, its birthrate dropped from 1.73 children per woman to 1.41. Its current economic woes aren't helping increase the birthrate, either. Although no country is safe right now from the global downturn, Serbia has a particularly high unemployment rate of 18%, as well as a large current account deficit. Still, the country's paid-leave policies for mothers are more generous than in Switzerland or the U.S.

Lithuania

9.11 births per 1,000 people

Population: 3,555,179
Urban Population: 67%
GDP per capita: $17,700
Unemployment: 4.3%
Women as % of Workforce: 49.5

Lithuania is currently dealing with a battered economy. Its GDP fell by more than 10% in the past year, and the head of Lithuania's central bank recently had to reassure investors that the country would not need an international bailout, after fears of a currency devaluation arose in neighbor Latvia. Along with these economic woes, Lithuania's birthrate has stalled at 9 births per 1,000 people. The government has not introduced any major initiatives to promote higher fertility rates.

Monaco

9.10 births per 1,000 people

Population: 32,965
Urban Population: 100%
GDP per capita: $30,000
Unemployment: 0%
Women as % of Workforce: N/A

Monaco may be the most densely populated country in the world, but its birthrate is one of the world's lowest‚ÄĒjust 1.75 children per woman.

Taiwan

8.99 births per 1,000 people

Population: 22,974,347
Urban Population: 69%
GDP per capita: $31,900
Unemployment: 6.3%
Women as % of Workforce: 42

The Taiwanese government has spent the past few years trying to recover from the family planning initiatives it encouraged in the 1950s and '60s. In 2006 the government amended employment laws to allow fathers to receive up to six months of leave benefits, and passed laws to improve the quality of child care in the country. In 2008 the government approved a white paper that proposed expanded educational subsidies for children under the age of 5. The paper warned that Taiwanese over the age of 65 would make up nearly 40% of the country's population by 2051.

Slovenia

8.97 births per 1,000 people

Population: 2,005,692
Urban Population: 48%
GDP per capita: $29,500
Unemployment: 6.7%
Women as % of Workforce: 45.9

Slovenia has one of the lowest birthrates in Europe, though like European countries such as the Netherlands and Bulgaria, it has a high rate of out-of-wedlock births. Slovenia's low birthrates will have a significant effect on the country's demographics: A 2008 report from Eurostat, the European Union's statistics office, stated that the total population of Slovenia will start to decline in 2020.

South Korea

8.93 births per 1,000 people

Population: 48,508,972
Urban Population: 81%
GDP per capita: $26,000
Unemployment: 3.8%
Women as % of Workforce: 40.8

South Korea's fertility rate has dropped from an average of 1.78 children per woman in 1992 to just 1.19 in 2006. South Korean government think tanks have been issuing warnings during the past few years about the aging of the country's population, saying that the national pension system will run out of money by 2047 if current demographic trends continue.


PestPatti
by on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:16 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Rust.n.Gears:

I just think you should be licensed. It is harder to get a dog than to have a baby.  

  Who gets to make the determination whether you pass or fail .   

Melissa_4
by Ruby Member on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:16 PM

Macao

8.88 births per 1,000 people

Population: 559,846
Urban Population: 100%
GDP per capita: $30,000
Unemployment: 3.0%
Women as % of Workforce: 47.2

Macao's reputation as a tourist destination popular with gamblers (the territory depends on gambling levies for its tax revenues), along with its high-density urban layout, makes it a less-than-ideal place to live with a large family. Immigration does not make up for the low birthrate of Macao residents. Like neighboring Hong Kong, Macao is a special administrative region of China, and while the government may need Chinese tourists, it cracks down hard on illegal immigrants from the mainland.

Bosnia and Herzegovina

8.85 births per 1,000 people

Population: 4,613,414
Urban Population: 47%
GDP per capita: $6,500
Unemployment: 31.1%
Women as % of Workforce: 46.1

Since the end of the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1995, the country has maintained a low birthrate. In 2003 and 2004, respectively, Bosnia's birthrate was 12.65 and 12.49 per 1,000 people. In 2005 it dropped to 8.75 per 1,000 and has hovered around there since. Unlike other countries, Bosnia has not taken any government initiatives to encourage citizens to have more children.

Czech Republic

8.83 births per 1,000 people

Population: 10,211,904
Urban Population: 73%
GDP per capita: $26,100
Unemployment: 5.5%
Women as % of Workforce: 44.2

Despite the Czech Republic's relatively strong economy (thanks to its manufacturing base closely tied to Western European markets), many women choose to have just one child, if they have children at all. During the past five years, the birthrate has held steady between 8 and 9 births per 1,000 people. (By comparison, Mongolians, a growing immigrant group in the Czech Republic, had an estimated birthrate of 21.05 births per 1,000 people back in their homeland.)

PestPatti
by on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:18 PM

There have been homeless and hungry all over the world, its not new.  

Quoting Lilfootmommy:

If the world isnt over populated then why are there SOOOO many people all over the world who are homeless and starving? There arent enough resources to support the entire population of the earth


Quoting jen2150:

If we have too many people please explain why I can live on 40 acres by myself. People that go hungry is more of a fact of government control. You really need to educate yourself. This is not the first time this idea has come up. People should always have the freedom to have as many kids as they can afford. I personally have two kids because it is what I can afford. Others are able to afford more. The important part is not how many kids you have but raising responsible adults that will benefit society.




Quoting GaleJ:

WE HAVE TOO MANY PEOPLE AND NOT ENOUGH RESOURCES!!! It really is that simple and America uses resources and produces garbage completely out of proportion to our population. There can be reasonable and voluntary population control now or great suffering down the line, to deny that is to condemn the generations that follow us.






Quoting jen2150:

The planet is not over populated. Cities but not the planet. No one has a right to tell you how many kids you should have. The UK governmwnt is a highly intrusive government and their citizens have few rights. So glad my country's fore fathers saw them for what they were. Population control has nothing to do with resources. It is just another way of exerting control.




Melissa_4
by Ruby Member on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:18 PM

Singapore


8.82 births per 1,000 people

Population: 4,657,542
Urban Population: 100%
GDP per capita: $52,000
Unemployment: 2.3%
Women as % of Workforce: 42.7

Singapore was rated the world's most innovative country in 2009, but it has been hurt by the global financial crisis. The country is heavily dependent on exports and has promoted economic policies that welcome foreign workers. Despite a shrinking GDP, Singapore may pull out of its recession; but even with a healthy economy the country must contend with changing demographics.

Singapore achieved independence in 1965; four years later, its government introduced a policy encouraging parents to have no more than two children, as part of an effort to stem population growth because of Singapore's small size and limited natural resources. The policy had a tremendous effect‚ÄĒtoday, 1 of every 12 Singaporeans is 65 or older; by 2020 the numbers will be 1 in 5. Singapore's foreign workers, who come from countries like the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Indonesia, do not have a significant impact on the birthrate.

Austria

8.65 births per 1,000 people

Population: 8,210,281
Urban Population: 67%
GDP per capita: $39,200
Unemployment: 5.4%
Women as % of Workforce: 44.7

The low-birthrate trend is not a new one in Austria. Since the 1970s, Austria has seen a growth in the average life expectancy of its citizens and a drop-off in its birthrate. Like other European countries, Austria has experienced an influx of immigrants, and they have accounted for the greatest part of Austria's net population growth. Austria's economy has been relatively stable amid the global financial turmoil; its diversified economy has helped it cope with an aging population and the economic downturn.

Germany

8.18 births per 1,000 people

Population: 82,329,758
Urban Population: 74%
GDP per capita: $34,200
Unemployment: 9.0%
Women as % of Workforce: 44.8

The second-most-populous country in Europe (after Russia), Germany has one of the lowest birthrates. Despite a huge boost from immigration, especially from countries such as Turkey, the population is getting older and less productive. The shrinking population will have a huge effect economically. In April, economists at the IMF said Germany's economic performance in 2009 would be the worst of any country in the euro zone except for Ireland.

Rust.n.Gears
by on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:19 PM
No clue. I'm too busy helping kids who don't have decent parents. I'm sick of it. Some people shouldn't be allowed to breed.

Quoting PestPatti:


Quoting Rust.n.Gears:

I just think you should be licensed. It is harder to get a dog than to have a baby.  

  Who gets to make the determination whether you pass or fail .   

Anonymous
by Anonymous 13 on Nov. 17, 2013 at 12:22 PM

I have one child, my choice, you have no more right to tell me to have more than I have to tell you to have less.  Do I think you should be stable before you bring any child into the world or be able to sport the ones you do, absolutely.

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