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The truth about Food Stamps cuts S/O

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 34 Replies

The proposed compromise measure would save $8.7 billion by restricting so-called “Heat and Eat” policies on the state level. The District of Columbia, New York, California, and 13 other states currently use the policy as a way to reduce paperwork and claim additional food stamp benefits for low-income citizens.

Here’s how “Heat and Eat” works: In most states across the country, people who spend more than half their income on housing and utilities are eligible for deductions which increase their benefit levels. For the most part, that means food stamp recipients need to show state agencies their housing and utility bills in order to claim the deduction. But in “Heat and Eat” states, anyone who qualifies for energy assistance is assumed to also qualify for the shelter deduction. That means that state agencies can automatically increase how much their citizens receive in food stamps by giving them a purely symbolic energy subsidy. Anyone who receives even $1 in energy assistance is eligible for more food stamp benefits than they would otherwise receive.

If the proposed $8.7 billion cut went through, then only people who receive a minimum of $20 in energy assistance would qualify for the deduction. Last week, the Washington Post editorial board said that would mean closing a massive “loophole” in nutrition law which provides some food stamp recipients with unearned benefit hikes.

 

 

It is closing a loophole which allows ANYONE who gets even a $1 in heating assistance take a shelter deduction.  It's a GOOD thing.  Meant to only give people what they qualify for.

Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 5, 2014 at 11:04 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Feb. 5, 2014 at 11:09 AM
So people won't be cut but will actually get more on FS?
katherinemcp
by Silver Member on Feb. 5, 2014 at 11:09 AM
Interesting.
Lo428
by get over yourself on Feb. 5, 2014 at 11:11 AM

People aren't oriental; rugs are.

Dzyre1115
by Desiree` on Feb. 5, 2014 at 11:14 AM

 I am sure everyone will manage......and if not they will have to make changes and/or sacrifices in other areas.  Just like people that are not on food stamps have to do when their income changes.

VicVinegar
by Gold Member on Feb. 5, 2014 at 11:16 AM

I just don't understand why there are people, like my ex, who don't work or look for a job get PA . While others who work their ads off but are only scraping by get nothing

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Feb. 5, 2014 at 11:20 AM
This is what everyone claims they want...trimming the government fat from these programs. This Heat and Eat program seems counterintuitive to me...if you are getting help with energy costs, shouldn't you have more money for food?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 5, 2014 at 12:23 PM

 

Quoting Anonymous: This is what everyone claims they want...trimming the government fat from these programs. This Heat and Eat program seems counterintuitive to me...if you are getting help with energy costs, shouldn't you have more money for food?

 One would think....It's MEANT for people wtih very large "shelter costs" USUALLY they have to show rental receeipts. In some states they only have to be getting fuel assistance...they are getting rid of that automatic increase.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Feb. 5, 2014 at 12:25 PM
How many people are only getting $1 in assistance and how much are they getting, on average, in food stamps?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 5, 2014 at 12:28 PM

 

Quoting Anonymous: How many people are only getting $1 in assistance and how much are they getting, on average, in food stamps?

 

The proposed compromise measure would save $8.7 billion by restricting so-called “Heat and Eat” policies on the state level. The District of Columbia, New York, California, and 13 other states currently use the policy as a way to reduce paperwork and claim additional food stamp benefits for low-income citizens.

Here’s how “Heat and Eat” works: In most states across the country, people who spend more than half their income on housing and utilities are eligible for deductions which increase their benefit levels. For the most part, that means food stamp recipients need to show state agencies their housing and utility bills in order to claim the deduction. But in “Heat and Eat” states, anyone who qualifies for energy assistance is assumed to also qualify for the shelter deduction. That means that state agencies can automatically increase how much their citizens receive in food stamps by giving them a purely symbolic energy subsidy. Anyone who receives even $1 in energy assistance is eligible for more food stamp benefits than they would otherwise receive.

If the proposed $8.7 billion cut went through, then only people who receive a minimum of $20 in energy assistance would qualify for the deduction. Last week, the Washington Post editorial board said that would mean closing a massive “loophole” in nutrition law which provides some food stamp recipients with unearned benefit hikes.

 

If you read this, it is a combined 8.7 BILLION dollars. They aren't entitled to it by income, but because they get energy assistance.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Feb. 5, 2014 at 12:42 PM
Yes, I read all of that initially, which is what prompted my question. How many people are benefitting from this loophole: 10, 2000, 1 million?

Quoting Anonymous:

 


Quoting Anonymous: How many people are only getting $1 in assistance and how much are they getting, on average, in food stamps?

 


The proposed compromise measure would save $8.7 billion by restricting so-called “Heat and Eat” policies on the state level. The District of Columbia, New York, California, and 13 other states currently use the policy as a way to reduce paperwork and claim additional food stamp benefits for low-income citizens.


Here’s how “Heat and Eat” works: In most states across the country, people who spend more than half their income on housing and utilities are eligible for deductions which increase their benefit levels. For the most part, that means food stamp recipients need to show state agencies their housing and utility bills in order to claim the deduction. But in “Heat and Eat” states, anyone who qualifies for energy assistance is assumed to also qualify for the shelter deduction. That means that state agencies can automatically increase how much their citizens receive in food stamps by giving them a purely symbolic energy subsidy. Anyone who receives even $1 in energy assistance is eligible for more food stamp benefits than they would otherwise receive.


If the proposed $8.7 billion cut went through, then only people who receive a minimum of $20 in energy assistance would qualify for the deduction. Last week, the Washington Post editorial board said that would mean closing a massive “loophole” in nutrition law which provides some food stamp recipients with unearned benefit hikes.


 


If you read this, it is a combined 8.7 BILLION dollars. They aren't entitled to it by income, but because they get energy assistance.

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