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do you believe dyslexia is real?

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
My dd is being tested for dyslexia at a private learning center because the school refused to give her the dyslexia test and just gave her the normal testing including a iq test...she past everything through school and has a iq of 125...(most dyslexic people pass the normal testing and have average to higher then average IQ's) So we decided to have her specifically tested for dyslexia at a private place so the school will have to supply extra help once she is officially diagnosed...
Anyways after talking with a friend tonight about it and what my dd is going through (struggling really bad in school)...
She told me my dd was just being lazy in school and with a iq of 125 that just proves it and dyslexia was not a real learning issue...

Edit...dd is severely dyslexic and struggles a lot, but she is very intelligent and has some amazing skills including music (singing), gymnastics and art...
Posted by Anonymous on Feb. 19, 2014 at 2:10 AM
Replies (81-90):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 19 on Feb. 20, 2014 at 8:22 AM
My dh is. While he can't spell or write very well he's a fucking genius with everything else (well a genius to me)
Anonymous
by Anonymous 20 on Feb. 20, 2014 at 8:27 AM
Dh is dsylexic. It is a real issue. Your friend is insane
zacmacsmomm
by Platinum Member on Feb. 20, 2014 at 8:42 AM

Of course dyslexia is real.  Learning disabilities have NOTHING to do with IQ scores.

SalemWitchChild
by Blessed be on Feb. 20, 2014 at 9:03 AM

It's different for different people. It can be things like b and d. Or it can be a big jumble. For DH it's a jumble.

Quoting Wendi2247: I need to research dyslexia. I thought people with dyslexia basically flip flop certain letters that look similar in appearance. Example, b and d? I never knew it made them see every word as a word jumble. Definitely going to educate myself on dyslexia. Off to research!

Quoting SalemWitchChild:

DH is dyslexic. Yes it is real, and yeah he is very smart. He had to be to teach himself how to read when the letters were a jumbled mess. You know those activities your teacher gave you that had letters jumbled up on a line and you were to figure out what the word was? Well that is how a dyslexic person sees words everyday. Except they are expected to read it in a second. They have to rearrange those letters in their head to figure out the word. So anyone who judges dyslexic people are just being an ass.


Anonymous
by Anonymous 21 on Feb. 20, 2014 at 9:13 AM

I have a 2nd grader who is only now reading at a kindergarten level.  And the only reason she has come this far is because she was diagnosed dyslexic in the fall and is now receiving special ed.  It is very real.

j3st3r
by Jedi on Feb. 20, 2014 at 9:15 AM
It sounds like they gave her a full scale psychoeducational evaluation, which includes tests for LD reading. Dyslexia is a form of LD reading.
desertlvn
by Gold Member on Feb. 20, 2014 at 9:22 AM
Some of our staff was given training. I don't know if they got certification after the training.

Quoting AutymsMommy:

Who provides Wilson? A certified OG tutor?

Quoting desertlvn: My school provides The Wilson Method for our dyslexic students. Is OG different?



Quoting AutymsMommy:

My daughter is in a specialized private school for bright/gifted dyslexic children. Our state public education system, as a whole, doesn't recognize dyslexia as a special need; they have no OG tutors on staff, not even a reading specialist in our local school, and haven't the resources to test specifically for it. We can turn in a privately administered psych ed eval, but we can't make them come up with the resources needed to help her succeed. Even with an IEP, she would rate generic resource help - when dyslexics need a very specific type of tutoring (most often Orton Gillingham tutoring).

Quoting Anonymous: In our case the school did refuse to test her specifically for dyslexia....I gave the school three different options to test her specifically for dyslexia...1) I would pay for the specific test and the school could keep it and use it to test other students 2) the school in the next town offered our school to borrow their test and 3) the school could buy the correct test themselves...they chose neither option





Quoting Heisenberg:

Your friend is ill informed and ignorant.

I am dyslexic, of course it's real. And it's not that the school refuses to test your daughter, it's that they don't have the means or resources. I suspect my son is dyslexic too, but he's only 3 so we have a long way to go before we get to diagnosing.



Anonymous
by Anonymous 22 on Feb. 20, 2014 at 9:25 AM
I have it. Mine isn't bad enough to really affect me day to day. Numbers are another deal altogether.

My IQ is 136 but I struggle with math especially when they toss in letters because my brain jumbles everything up in a math problem :(
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Feb. 20, 2014 at 10:53 AM
She struggles with math because she reverses her number...for example she will write 52 instead of 25....however if she doesn't have to write it down she does pretty well...flash cards she does great at

Quoting Anonymous:

My daughter has severe dyslexia but has an IQ of 121. When the school did the tests for her (several years ago) the Dr told us that she had Dyslexia but due to new regulations they weren't allowed to make a specific diagnosis through the school, even though it was an outside office that did the testing, and that if I wanted an official diagnosis on paper I would have to take her for private testing.

Luckily every school she has been to has been very accomodating and they are aware of the regulations and are willing to listen to me and her previous school and come up with an IEP to accomodate her.

My daughter is a junior now and reads on her grade level. She still struggles with some things but she has learned a lot of great skills over the years and she is her own best advocate. She's not afraid to ask for help if she needs it and she makes sure she uses the tools built into her IEP, like extra time on tests or books on tape if she needs them. Now that she's older she doesn't automatically get those things, she has to ask for them ahead of time and make the proper arrangements. 

Just out of curiosity, how is your daughter with math?

Anonymous
by Anonymous 15 on Feb. 20, 2014 at 12:35 PM

My daughter has no problem with numbers, only letters. She actually loves math and does very well in with it.

Does your daughter have a nook or kindle to read from? I know a lot of people with Dyslexia say it helps them because they can adjust the font size and spacing to what works best for them. Some people, like my daughter, prefer the black and white ones with a black case, but other people say the color ones with a colored case works best for them. I just depends on the person. My daughter downloads all of her reading books and even most of her textbooks onto the nook and uses that about 90% of the time. It's even in her IEP that she can use it in school. It has helped her a lot.

Quoting Anonymous: She struggles with math because she reverses her number...for example she will write 52 instead of 25....however if she doesn't have to write it down she does pretty well...flash cards she does great at

Quoting Anonymous:

My daughter has severe dyslexia but has an IQ of 121. When the school did the tests for her (several years ago) the Dr told us that she had Dyslexia but due to new regulations they weren't allowed to make a specific diagnosis through the school, even though it was an outside office that did the testing, and that if I wanted an official diagnosis on paper I would have to take her for private testing.

Luckily every school she has been to has been very accomodating and they are aware of the regulations and are willing to listen to me and her previous school and come up with an IEP to accomodate her.

My daughter is a junior now and reads on her grade level. She still struggles with some things but she has learned a lot of great skills over the years and she is her own best advocate. She's not afraid to ask for help if she needs it and she makes sure she uses the tools built into her IEP, like extra time on tests or books on tape if she needs them. Now that she's older she doesn't automatically get those things, she has to ask for them ahead of time and make the proper arrangements. 

Just out of curiosity, how is your daughter with math?


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