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Dogs

Posted by on Mar. 12, 2014 at 9:51 AM
  • 25 Replies

 Hasanyone ever owned or owns now a Corgi, I found one that my son wants very badly it is mixed with Pekignese. I was wondering what their temperments are how, if they are very rambunctious. I know puppies can be wild at times, but just wondering what their temperments are and how they are as adult dogs.

by on Mar. 12, 2014 at 9:51 AM
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lanes_mom0109
by Silver Member on Mar. 12, 2014 at 9:51 AM
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Idk but here's a bump. All the info I have on them is how adorable they are :/
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Mar. 12, 2014 at 9:53 AM
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My sister had one and it was really good with her kids but it would fight with her other dog.
jamminmomma
by Silver Member on Mar. 12, 2014 at 9:59 AM

 Thank you, I really want to get a dog that will be a forever part of our family. We do not have other dogs just cats, we had a wonderful little chihuahua and had to heve her put to sleep due to sickness and no hope for her other than suffering and I could not let her suffer. Ever since we lost her he has done nothing but beg for another dog he could love on and love him back.

Quoting Anonymous: My sister had one and it was really good with her kids but it would fight with her other dog.

 

babyspots17
by Gold Member on Mar. 12, 2014 at 10:00 AM
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What Kind of Temperament Does the Pembroke Welsh Corgi Have? Much as children from one family differ in personality, so do puppies differ within a litter. While the Corgi as a breed is a bright, outgoing, happy dog with a droll sense of humor, they can also be either very soft and submissive or quite dominant and bossy. The trick is to make sure the puppy you select out of the litter matches your personality and lifestyle. An overly soft or very bossy Corgi would not be a good choice for an active family with children. A Corgi that attempts to bite should never be tolerated. Pembrokes are usually very clean dogs that housebreak easily. They do not have any special dietary needs other than a good brand name puppy food up to six to nine months of age. After that, a good, brand-name, balanced adult food is all they will need.

Are There Any Health Concerns in the Pembroke Welsh Corgi? The Pembroke is well known as a sturdy, healthy breed of dog with few inherited problems. All breeding stock should have the following health clearances: hips that have been certified free of hip dysplasia by either OFA (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals) or the PennHip method, their eyes should have been examined by a board certified veterinary opthalmologist and registered with CERF (Canine Eye Registry Foundation) - the only exception would be a Pembroke that has been diagnosed with PPM (Persisant Pupilary Membrane) for which a Pembroke will not be issued a CERF number, yet is still cleared for breeding - and finally, all breeding stock should be DNA tested for vonWillebrand's Disease (a bleeding disorder) or proven clear by clear parentage. Please note that while all dogs used for breeding should have the above health clearances, if you buy a puppy or adult dog that proves to be dysplastic or vWD affected, these dogs can usually live full, normal lives. Because a Pembroke is not a weight-bearing breed, even dogs that are dysplastic are often symptom free throughout their lives. Also, the type of vWD that affects Pembrokes is a very mild form of the disease and often even affected dogs show no symptoms throughout their lives. The exception to this is that a vWD affected dog will be more likely to have a bleeding episode if it is under a great deal of physical stress (such as surgery).

 this is from ppwcc.org

Personally I love corgi's everyone I have ever been around was fun, silly, and friendly but they all had experianced dog owners and were used to active/social lifestyle.  They are the next dog that I will be getting . 

Bibi86
by on Mar. 12, 2014 at 10:01 AM
I had a corgi when I was 13. His name was scooter. He followed me to school every day and then went back home. He was an awesome dog... Then one day he got ran over on our way to school :(
jamminmomma
by Silver Member on Mar. 12, 2014 at 10:04 AM

 This is what I want fo rmy son, he is an active little boy and keep this little dog active. I am sorry for the loss of your little guy

Quoting Bibi86: I had a corgi when I was 13. His name was scooter. He followed me to school every day and then went back home. He was an awesome dog... Then one day he got ran over on our way to school :(

 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Mar. 12, 2014 at 10:07 AM
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Mobile Photo

I know nothing about the breed but I feel compelled to share this picture.

It's a huskie/corgi mix.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Mar. 12, 2014 at 10:08 AM

Since what you are getting is a mutt, there is no way of kowing how much of ecah kind of dog your puppy will be, or indeed if in fact they are sure what the breeding is.

It's not often a show dog with the ideal temperment and backgound is then bred to another show dog with the classic temperment of that breed....

Now having said that-both breeds aren't known for being aggressive towards children. And IME the way you raise a dog has a lot more to do with it's temperment than it's breeding (in general)

Female dogs do tend a bit less towards aggression in any breed, and neutering at the proper age can prevent many many many issues.

jamminmomma
by Silver Member on Mar. 12, 2014 at 10:13 AM

 Thank you, growing up all my family ever had was mutts, or mixed breeds and we always had the best dogs. I am not sure if it is true or not but with experience you usually get the best of both breeds, and the one thing I am most worried about is the biting my kids. As long as they are not biters than I think it would work out.

Quoting Anonymous:

Since what you are getting is a mutt, there is no way of kowing how much of ecah kind of dog your puppy will be, or indeed if in fact they are sure what the breeding is.

It's not often a show dog with the ideal temperment and backgound is then bred to another show dog with the classic temperment of that breed....

Now having said that-both breeds aren't known for being aggressive towards children. And IME the way you raise a dog has a lot more to do with it's temperment than it's breeding (in general)

Female dogs do tend a bit less towards aggression in any breed, and neutering at the proper age can prevent many many many issues.

 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Mar. 12, 2014 at 10:23 AM

 

Quoting jamminmomma:

 Thank you, growing up all my family ever had was mutts, or mixed breeds and we always had the best dogs. I am not sure if it is true or not but with experience you usually get the best of both breeds, and the one thing I am most worried about is the biting my kids. As long as they are not biters than I think it would work out.

Quoting Anonymous:

Since what you are getting is a mutt, there is no way of kowing how much of ecah kind of dog your puppy will be, or indeed if in fact they are sure what the breeding is.

It's not often a show dog with the ideal temperment and backgound is then bred to another show dog with the classic temperment of that breed....

Now having said that-both breeds aren't known for being aggressive towards children. And IME the way you raise a dog has a lot more to do with it's temperment than it's breeding (in general)

Female dogs do tend a bit less towards aggression in any breed, and neutering at the proper age can prevent many many many issues.

 

 Dogs bite for many reasons. Fear, defense and improper training. A properly brought up puppy who is taught to not bite nip or growl who feels secure and isn't mistreated is not very likely to bite.

I have 2 Aussies. One I raised from a puppy and one that was a rescue. My dog i raised form a puppy is bullet proof. I don't think you could get her to bite someone (although she ill lick, jump on and knock over a kid-she would never bite)

My other dog who was abused AND is fearful? He would absolutely bite someone. Not me, but absolutely bite. I actually kept him for this reason. He is so bonded with me and so fearful of men and strangers that i would never trust anyone else to manage his behavior. In fact he was my foster dog and was SUCH a love-until he got comfortable and decided I was his person to protect.

Aussies are NOT known for being this way (although they are known to be over protective-managed by early socialization) My Aussie is this way because he was abused ( he is missinf 7 teeth on one side of his mouth-the roots had to be extracted) He was clearly and obviously abused which is why he has his issues.

We manage  his issues. My son ONLY pets him if he is on the floor -never in his crate or on the sofa. He only pets him on the head and briefly.  And we all talk to the dog a lot which is calming to him. In fact no one approaches him without talking to him-and only I can pet him without him  approaching me for petting.

So far it is working great.

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