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iep 504

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 6 Replies
My 8year old has an iep and I don't really know what that is. He gets speech help 3 days a week not as much reading help as last year. He also has a smaller spelling list 11 words not 15 like the rest of the class. His teacher called talking about evaluating him now not waiting until October. She mentioned a 504 plan. Ok looked it up but I don't understand the difference between the two.
So what is a 504 plan and if your child has one what's it for?
His teacher is worried about his sentence structure and spacing words. He leaves out smaller connecting words. And his handwriting is not getting better. He's been behind on everything but he's really doing a lot better this year. And I really like his teacher this year.
Posted by Anonymous on Mar. 12, 2014 at 12:29 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 12, 2014 at 12:35 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 12, 2014 at 12:37 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 12, 2014 at 12:38 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 12, 2014 at 12:39 PM
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Siobhan69
by on Mar. 12, 2014 at 12:40 PM

  A 504 plan, which falls under civil-rights law, is an attempt to remove barriers and allow students with disabilities to participate freely; like the Americans With Disabilities Act, it seeks to level the playing field so that those students can safely pursue the same opportunities as everyone else. An IEP, which falls under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, is much more concerned with actually providing educational services. Students eligible for an IEP, or Individualized Education Plan, represent a small subset of all students with disabilities. They generally require more than a level playing field -- they require significant remediation and assistance, and are more likely to work on their own level at their own pace even in an inclusive classroom. Only certain classifications of disability are eligible for an IEP, and students who do not meet those classifications but still require some assistance to be able to participate fully in school would be candidates for a 504 plan.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 12, 2014 at 12:45 PM
And deploy put provides educational services. Would a 504 plan not?

Quoting Siobhan69:

  A 504 plan, which falls under civil-rights law, is an attempt to remove barriers and allow students with disabilities to participate freely; like the Americans With Disabilities Act, it seeks to level the playing field so that those students can safely pursue the same opportunities as everyone else. An IEP, which falls under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, is much more concerned with actually providing educational services. Students eligible for an IEP, or Individualized Education Plan, represent a small subset of all students with disabilities. They generally require more than a level playing field -- they require significant remediation and assistance, and are more likely to work on their own level at their own pace even in an inclusive classroom. Only certain classifications of disability are eligible for an IEP, and students who do not meet those classifications but still require some assistance to be able to participate fully in school would be candidates for a 504 plan.

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