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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

She always has to pee!!

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 26 Replies

My 5 yo has to use the restroom every 10-20 minutes. Sometimes she will go 30, but that's probably only every ten or so trips. I am not exaggerating on the times. It often takes her hours to get to sleep at night because before she can fall asleep she has to get up again. She wears a pull up at night.

She has been to the doc and all the simple things have been ruled out (uti, on-site-irritation...) and they did a full blood work up. They tested organ function, blood levels, and 19 different food allergies. She seriously checked like every box on the blood work form. Everything came back negative. Which is good, I know. Except that we still have a problem.

She's been referred to Urology but it takes a while to get in. So I'm looking around for any BTDT or suggestions while we await our appointment. It is really starting to stress her out and it makes outings very difficult. Going anywhere more than 10 minutes away is just asking for hysterics in the car. She goes from "I need to pee" to OMG going to pee my pants screaming in about 60 seconds. And it really seems legit. She gets frantic if she cannot get to a restroom immediately.

This time it's been going on for about 3-4 weeks now. Before that she was at about every hour for several months. Back in July she experienced this same issue and at the time they thought maybe constipation. We tried clearing her out and soon after it did improve, though as I said only out to an hour. But when doc looked over her results from July, she said she was not constipated. So it's a coincidence that it subsided just after. But the total span of that time was only about 3 weeks, so we are already past that point and it's not letting up.

Has anyone experienced anything similar either in themselves or their children?? We've tried everything we can think of.

Posted by Anonymous on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:09 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:11 AM

I'm the same way but I have had 7 kids..........

I googled and found this

Overactive Bladder in Children

Overactive bladder is a form of urinary incontinence, which is the involuntary release of urine. Children as well as adults can have an overactive bladder.

What Are the Signs of Overactive Bladder in Children?

A child with an overactive bladder will need to urinate frequently and, at times, the need may be urgent. He or she may not make it to the toilet before the urine begins to flow.

What Causes Overactive Bladder in Children?

Children with overactive bladders have a need to urinate more often than usual because their bladder muscles have uncontrollable spasms. The muscles surrounding the urethra -- the tube from the bladder that urine passes through -- can be affected. These muscles are meant to prevent urine from leaving the body, but they may be "overridden" if the bladder undergoes a strong contraction.

Urinary tract infections can cause a need to urinate as the urinary tract becomes inflamed and uncomfortable. Certain neurological conditions may cause these symptoms.

Another cause of overactive bladder is a condition called pollakiuria, or frequent daytime urination syndrome. Children who have pollakiuria urinate frequently. In some cases, they may urinate every five to 10 minutes or urinate between 10 and 30 times a day. This condition is most common among children aged 3 to 8 and is present only during waking hours. There are no other symptoms present. Doctors believe that pollakiuria is related to stress. Usually, the condition goes away after two to three weeks without requiring treatment.

Other causes of overactive bladder in children include:

  • consumption of caffeine, which increases urine output and can cause spasms in the bladder muscle
  • consumption of ingredients that a child may be allergic to
  • events that cause anxiety
  • infrequent urination (holding urine for too long a period of time)
  • small bladder capacity
  • structural abnormalities in the bladder or urethra
  • constipation

 

How Is Overactive Bladder Treated in Children?

In most cases, children outgrow the problem of an overactive bladder. For each year after the age of 5, the number of overactive bladder cases declines by 15%. The child may learn to respond in a more timely manner to the body's signals to urinate or bladder capacity may increase over time. In addition, overactive bladders can "settle down," often when stressful events or experiences have ended.

If the child does not outgrow the condition, treatments can include bladder training and medication. In bladder training, the child uses exercises to strengthen and coordinate the urethra and bladder muscles to control urination. Such exercises teach the child to prevent urinating when away from the toilet and to anticipate the urge to urinate. Additional techniques to help overactive bladder include:

  • avoiding caffeine or other ingredients that may encourage overactive bladder
  • using timed voiding, or urinating on a schedule -- for example, every two hours
  • adopting healthy urination habits, such as taking enough time to urinate and relaxing muscles during urination


Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:31 AM

Thank you. I'm scared of googling lol. I swear you can tell webmd you have a headache and it will come back you have cancer.

I went ahead and googled Pollakiuria and it sounds fitting. We've been wondering ourselves if it isn't stress/anxiety related. There are no major stressors in her life that we're aware of. But we always seem to be in a hurry. Always running late to wherever we need to go. And it does seem to get worse when we're getting ready to leave. Pee, brush teeth, pee, put on shoes, pee, make it out the door. 2 minute drive then she has to go first thing upon arrival.

We decided we'd try this week to not rush her at all. We will make a point of getting ready earlier and even if we are running late, we will not hurry. We'll be late if we must. We did this all day today. She maintained about a 20 minute average.

Quoting Sassy762:

I'm the same way but I have had 7 kids..........

I googled and found this

Overactive Bladder in Children

Overactive bladder is a form of urinary incontinence, which is the involuntary release of urine. Children as well as adults can have an overactive bladder.

What Are the Signs of Overactive Bladder in Children?

A child with an overactive bladder will need to urinate frequently and, at times, the need may be urgent. He or she may not make it to the toilet before the urine begins to flow.

What Causes Overactive Bladder in Children?

Children with overactive bladders have a need to urinate more often than usual because their bladder muscles have uncontrollable spasms. The muscles surrounding the urethra -- the tube from the bladder that urine passes through -- can be affected. These muscles are meant to prevent urine from leaving the body, but they may be "overridden" if the bladder undergoes a strong contraction.

Urinary tract infections can cause a need to urinate as the urinary tract becomes inflamed and uncomfortable. Certain neurological conditions may cause these symptoms.

Another cause of overactive bladder is a condition called pollakiuria, or frequent daytime urination syndrome. Children who have pollakiuria urinate frequently. In some cases, they may urinate every five to 10 minutes or urinate between 10 and 30 times a day. This condition is most common among children aged 3 to 8 and is present only during waking hours. There are no other symptoms present. Doctors believe that pollakiuria is related to stress. Usually, the condition goes away after two to three weeks without requiring treatment.

Other causes of overactive bladder in children include:

  • consumption of caffeine, which increases urine output and can cause spasms in the bladder muscle
  • consumption of ingredients that a child may be allergic to
  • events that cause anxiety
  • infrequent urination (holding urine for too long a period of time)
  • small bladder capacity
  • structural abnormalities in the bladder or urethra
  • constipation


How Is Overactive Bladder Treated in Children?

In most cases, children outgrow the problem of an overactive bladder. For each year after the age of 5, the number of overactive bladder cases declines by 15%. The child may learn to respond in a more timely manner to the body's signals to urinate or bladder capacity may increase over time. In addition, overactive bladders can "settle down," often when stressful events or experiences have ended.

If the child does not outgrow the condition, treatments can include bladder training and medication. In bladder training, the child uses exercises to strengthen and coordinate the urethra and bladder muscles to control urination. Such exercises teach the child to prevent urinating when away from the toilet and to anticipate the urge to urinate. Additional techniques to help overactive bladder include:

  • avoiding caffeine or other ingredients that may encourage overactive bladder
  • using timed voiding, or urinating on a schedule -- for example, every two hours
  • adopting healthy urination habits, such as taking enough time to urinate and relaxing muscles during urination


Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:32 AM

I hope y'all find out what is wrong and can get it fixed. 

Quoting Anonymous:

Thank you. I'm scared of googling lol. I swear you can tell webmd you have a headache and it will come back you have cancer.

I went ahead and googled Pollakiuria and it sounds fitting. We've been wondering ourselves if it isn't stress/anxiety related. There are no major stressors in her life that we're aware of. But we always seem to be in a hurry. Always running late to wherever we need to go. And it does seem to get worse when we're getting ready to leave. Pee, brush teeth, pee, put on shoes, pee, make it out the door. 2 minute drive then she has to go first thing upon arrival.

We decided we'd try this week to not rush her at all. We will make a point of getting ready earlier and even if we are running late, we will not hurry. We'll be late if we must. We did this all day today. She maintained about a 20 minute average.

Quoting Sassy762:

I'm the same way but I have had 7 kids..........

I googled and found this

Overactive Bladder in Children

Overactive bladder is a form of urinary incontinence, which is the involuntary release of urine. Children as well as adults can have an overactive bladder.

What Are the Signs of Overactive Bladder in Children?

A child with an overactive bladder will need to urinate frequently and, at times, the need may be urgent. He or she may not make it to the toilet before the urine begins to flow.

What Causes Overactive Bladder in Children?

Children with overactive bladders have a need to urinate more often than usual because their bladder muscles have uncontrollable spasms. The muscles surrounding the urethra -- the tube from the bladder that urine passes through -- can be affected. These muscles are meant to prevent urine from leaving the body, but they may be "overridden" if the bladder undergoes a strong contraction.

Urinary tract infections can cause a need to urinate as the urinary tract becomes inflamed and uncomfortable. Certain neurological conditions may cause these symptoms.

Another cause of overactive bladder is a condition called pollakiuria, or frequent daytime urination syndrome. Children who have pollakiuria urinate frequently. In some cases, they may urinate every five to 10 minutes or urinate between 10 and 30 times a day. This condition is most common among children aged 3 to 8 and is present only during waking hours. There are no other symptoms present. Doctors believe that pollakiuria is related to stress. Usually, the condition goes away after two to three weeks without requiring treatment.

Other causes of overactive bladder in children include:

  • consumption of caffeine, which increases urine output and can cause spasms in the bladder muscle
  • consumption of ingredients that a child may be allergic to
  • events that cause anxiety
  • infrequent urination (holding urine for too long a period of time)
  • small bladder capacity
  • structural abnormalities in the bladder or urethra
  • constipation


How Is Overactive Bladder Treated in Children?

In most cases, children outgrow the problem of an overactive bladder. For each year after the age of 5, the number of overactive bladder cases declines by 15%. The child may learn to respond in a more timely manner to the body's signals to urinate or bladder capacity may increase over time. In addition, overactive bladders can "settle down," often when stressful events or experiences have ended.

If the child does not outgrow the condition, treatments can include bladder training and medication. In bladder training, the child uses exercises to strengthen and coordinate the urethra and bladder muscles to control urination. Such exercises teach the child to prevent urinating when away from the toilet and to anticipate the urge to urinate. Additional techniques to help overactive bladder include:

  • avoiding caffeine or other ingredients that may encourage overactive bladder
  • using timed voiding, or urinating on a schedule -- for example, every two hours
  • adopting healthy urination habits, such as taking enough time to urinate and relaxing muscles during urination



wkukid
by Beach Bum on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:32 AM

I pee a lot when my anxiety kicks in.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:34 AM
I pee alot when I am anxious.
bowribbonmama
by Ruby Member on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:37 AM
Has she been tested for diabetes?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:38 AM

If you think it may be anxiety, try giving her a placebo. Give her a non-animal shaped children's vitamin (like those balls or something) and tell her the doctor said to take them and it would help her not have to go so much. Just to see.

Quoting Anonymous:

Thank you. I'm scared of googling lol. I swear you can tell webmd you have a headache and it will come back you have cancer.

I went ahead and googled Pollakiuria and it sounds fitting. We've been wondering ourselves if it isn't stress/anxiety related. There are no major stressors in her life that we're aware of. But we always seem to be in a hurry. Always running late to wherever we need to go. And it does seem to get worse when we're getting ready to leave. Pee, brush teeth, pee, put on shoes, pee, make it out the door. 2 minute drive then she has to go first thing upon arrival.

We decided we'd try this week to not rush her at all. We will make a point of getting ready earlier and even if we are running late, we will not hurry. We'll be late if we must. We did this all day today. She maintained about a 20 minute average.

Quoting Sassy762:

I'm the same way but I have had 7 kids..........

I googled and found this

Overactive Bladder in Children

Overactive bladder is a form of urinary incontinence, which is the involuntary release of urine. Children as well as adults can have an overactive bladder.

What Are the Signs of Overactive Bladder in Children?

A child with an overactive bladder will need to urinate frequently and, at times, the need may be urgent. He or she may not make it to the toilet before the urine begins to flow.

What Causes Overactive Bladder in Children?

Children with overactive bladders have a need to urinate more often than usual because their bladder muscles have uncontrollable spasms. The muscles surrounding the urethra -- the tube from the bladder that urine passes through -- can be affected. These muscles are meant to prevent urine from leaving the body, but they may be "overridden" if the bladder undergoes a strong contraction.

Urinary tract infections can cause a need to urinate as the urinary tract becomes inflamed and uncomfortable. Certain neurological conditions may cause these symptoms.

Another cause of overactive bladder is a condition called pollakiuria, or frequent daytime urination syndrome. Children who have pollakiuria urinate frequently. In some cases, they may urinate every five to 10 minutes or urinate between 10 and 30 times a day. This condition is most common among children aged 3 to 8 and is present only during waking hours. There are no other symptoms present. Doctors believe that pollakiuria is related to stress. Usually, the condition goes away after two to three weeks without requiring treatment.

Other causes of overactive bladder in children include:

  • consumption of caffeine, which increases urine output and can cause spasms in the bladder muscle
  • consumption of ingredients that a child may be allergic to
  • events that cause anxiety
  • infrequent urination (holding urine for too long a period of time)
  • small bladder capacity
  • structural abnormalities in the bladder or urethra
  • constipation


How Is Overactive Bladder Treated in Children?

In most cases, children outgrow the problem of an overactive bladder. For each year after the age of 5, the number of overactive bladder cases declines by 15%. The child may learn to respond in a more timely manner to the body's signals to urinate or bladder capacity may increase over time. In addition, overactive bladders can "settle down," often when stressful events or experiences have ended.

If the child does not outgrow the condition, treatments can include bladder training and medication. In bladder training, the child uses exercises to strengthen and coordinate the urethra and bladder muscles to control urination. Such exercises teach the child to prevent urinating when away from the toilet and to anticipate the urge to urinate. Additional techniques to help overactive bladder include:

  • avoiding caffeine or other ingredients that may encourage overactive bladder
  • using timed voiding, or urinating on a schedule -- for example, every two hours
  • adopting healthy urination habits, such as taking enough time to urinate and relaxing muscles during urination



jaycam
by on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:40 AM
I'm the same way. Dh always says my bladder is the size of a grape.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:41 AM

This happened to my cousin when she drank apple juice.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 5 on Mar. 24, 2014 at 1:47 AM

This happened to mine when she started having panic attacks. She also had a fascination with toilets due to her Aspergers AND had to pee a lot due to her Cerebral Palsy. So we were constantly running to the toilet. It was impossible to tell which problem it was. It drove me nuts, obviously I couldn't punish her incase she needed to go and then had an accident. My youngest has a very weak bladder (she's been hospitalized for UTI's before) but she can normally hold it for a hour or two (but when she DOES need to go it happens very fast).

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