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Autistic children and their future

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post

Are you concerned with the next generation of autistic adults?  I think it's fair to wonder since there are more children diagnosed with autism everyday.  The numbers are alarming.  1 in 68.  (Edit) 

Discuss with empathy and class, please.

Posted by Anonymous on Mar. 28, 2014 at 4:23 PM
Replies (31-40):
Anonymous
by Anonymous on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:23 PM
They will procreate you know.

Quoting Anonymous:

lots of people in care homes!! in the end its basically population control...

Lavie74
by Bronze Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:26 PM

 I think autism has always been present diagnosis just wasn't made. The good news is that early intervention is proven to bring about much improvement over time. So I am optamistic that most of these children will grow up to be happy functional adults.

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:26 PM

Wow.  I had no idea.  And I bet you are correct when you mention adults not knowing they have autism.  It makes me wonder if all these children that were cast aside as under-achievers or problem kids 30 years ago are merely autistic.  

Quoting Anonymous: A lot of the great minds in science have symptoms of autism and are thought to may have had autism. There are celebrities, like Daryl Hannah, Susan Boyle and Dan Akroyd that have come forward with their autism diagnosis. Many adults that are currently in the workforce are undiagnosed, but may have autism. I have met quite a few women on here that were diagnosed as adults. "Function" is a term that is starting to know longer be used. Just because you are considered "low functioning" as a child doesn't mean you'll be considered it as an adult, or teen even. Jacob Barnett (youngest astrophysicist and nominated for a nobel prize) and Carly Fleischmann (coauthor and nonverbal adult that is currently attending a university and has a large internet following) are both examples of what a "low functioning" child with autism can accomplish.


Anonymous
by Anonymous on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:27 PM
1 mom liked this
Are you serious? What a bitch

Quoting Anonymous:

lots of people in care homes!! in the end its basically population control...

StarLight23
by Silver Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:32 PM

I worry to an extent, but my son is very high functioning and he is working on his social skills every day. We tell him he can do anything he wants but there are some skills he needs to learn before that; like how to listen and follow directions.

I think my son will be able to live on his own and hold down a job; even marry and have kids.

I do worry about some of the families that have other children not only with autism but other developmental or mental disabilities; what will happen to them? yk?


Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:32 PM

The glass is half full.  I like that attitude.  It's a shame that so many kids were put through the ringer many years ago because they were misdiagnosed.  I hope that through diligent research and thinking 'out of the box', the medical/mental health community will consider a broader net to identify a cause for this disorder.  

Quoting Lavie74:

 I think autism has always been present diagnosis just wasn't made. The good news is that early intervention is proven to bring about much improvement over time. So I am optamistic that most of these children will grow up to be happy functional adults.


Anonymous
by Anonymous on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:33 PM
My nephew is 20, very low functioning . He has the intelligence of maybe a 4 yr old.y sister is 47. He is at home right now, but we have made plans for when we are gone, his parents,y husband and I, and if his sisters won't take care of him. He would go to an adult living facility specializing in autistic adults. His ssi should pay for it.
It is heartbreaking to make these plans, but it has to be done.
God bless.

Quoting Anonymous: I know my older son will be able to be a productive member of society, but I worry about my younger son. What will happen when DH & I die? If he's still living at home (which is likely) where will he go? While he would probably feel most comfortable & safe with one of his siblings, I don't feel they should have to care for him. They would most likely have their own families, etc. I also hate the thought of him in a group home :/

I really hope his skills drastically improve, for his own sake.
Anonymous
by Anonymous on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:35 PM
1 mom liked this
I have a theory...I think the amount of people with sensory processing disorder and autism is the next step in our evolving species. Sort of like x men. Misunderstood, difficult to adjust to functioning in society, ostracized, in some cases feared. ...I think eventually, life will adjust, society will adjust (we've made great strides already) and we'll see a new level of advancement in so many ways, ways we can't conceive of yet. Because we're a short sighted as a people, xenophobic, and narcissistic.
Anonymous
by Anonymous on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:37 PM
I do believe that is genetic. My uncle, brother and nephew on my mom's side of the family are autistic.
With patience and the help of a counselor and support group.
When I first met him I thought he was weird. We were friends for 3 years before we started dating.

Quoting Anonymous:

Do you feel that the fact that your son has autism proves a genetic link to the disability?  And how do you cope with your DH challenges -- if they exist within your marriage, of course.  You didnt find him 'weird'.  Lo.

Quoting Anonymous: Idk. Honestly my husband is High functioning and works. He has a degree in computer science. Graduated highest GPA in his course of study. Most people think he's just weird.
My son isn't as high functioning but not really low functioning. Everyday we work on his skills. He is not in school yet.

The.Last.Rebel
by Gold Member on Mar. 28, 2014 at 9:38 PM
1 mom liked this
Idk, I'm worried for my son although he's not exactly low functioning.
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