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Common Core Myths vs. Facts

Posted by on Mar. 30, 2014 at 5:59 PM
  • 16 Replies

http://www.usnews.com/news/special-reports/a-guide-to-common-core/articles/2014/03/04/common-core-myths-and-facts

Whether you support or oppose Common Core, at least know what you're talking about.

Much of the supposed "Common Core" stuff that is posted has nothing to do with Common Core at all and is just crappy homework.

For the record, Texas rejected Common Core and they still teach math in an absurdly complicated way.  A lot of what you misconstrue as Common Core is nothng more than a shitty worksheet.

by on Mar. 30, 2014 at 5:59 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Cmgmqmmom
by on Mar. 30, 2014 at 6:01 PM
1 mom liked this
Thank you.
It's not just on here, there are plenty of FB posts I see that bash common core when the real issue isn't common core at all.
Ray-of-Beezy
by Platinum Member on Mar. 30, 2014 at 6:03 PM
1 mom liked this
I must live under a rock because I have no idea what Common Core is.

Off to read the link provided...

ETA Read the link and now it makes sense as to why I've never heard it -- my son isn't in school yet. However it seems helpful from the small fraction I've read.
SelaCarsen
by Bronze Member on Mar. 30, 2014 at 6:06 PM
1 mom liked this

A lot of the procedural complaints about Common Core are actually about the Everyday Math curriculum and its cohorts. I hate EM with everything in me. It's ridiculously repetetive and pointless, while still managing to avoid direct, useful function.

However, I don't agree with some of the overall objectives to Common Core.

But yes, they are two separate issues.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Mar. 30, 2014 at 6:59 PM
1 mom liked this

As a math teacher of the common core standards, I wish people would start thinking of common core as being a list of learning goals for each grade level. That is all it is. Common core DOES NOT tell the teacher what problems to use or how to teach it. That would be a curriculum that has been adopted by the specific school district. Common core is not a curriculum. Common core is a list of standards (learning goals). 


Often, the complaints I'm seeing about common core is actually a complaint about how the teacher is choosing to teach, how the curriculum chooses to teach (textbooks/workbooks), or how the school district and/or state is choosing to implement the standards. Those are not complaints about common core standards.

Some have also complained about students following specific goals which they all must meet (cookie cutter standards). That has been occurring in every state for DECADES. ALL states use some type of standards. Parents have only recently been aware of this because of publicity of common core. Even WE had to master specific standards when we were in first grade. That's teaching 101....follow the standards and not the book. Otherwise, who knows what kind of things would be taught at a whim. 

LectioDivina
by on Mar. 30, 2014 at 7:01 PM
Granted my kids are still in kinder, but it seems great to me.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 2, 2014 at 5:01 PM

Common Core is in many of the places that has 'rejected' it. It's just labeled under a different name.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Apr. 2, 2014 at 5:03 PM

HERE is the website for common core, and all questions can be answered

http://www.corestandards.org/

rather than an MSM article

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Apr. 2, 2014 at 5:03 PM

What Parents Should Know

Today’s students are preparing to enter a world in which colleges and businesses are demanding more than ever before. To ensure all students are ready for success after high school, the Common Core State Standards establish clear, consistent guidelines for what every student should know and be able to do in math and English language arts from kindergarten through 12th grade.

The standards were drafted by experts and teachers from across the country and are designed to ensure students are prepared for today’s entry-level careers, freshman-level college courses, and workforce training programs. The Common Core focuses on developing the critical-thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills students will need to be successful. Forty-four states, the District of Columbia, four territories, and the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) have voluntarily adopted and are moving forward with the standards.

The new standards also provide a way for teachers to measure student progress throughout the school year and ensure that students are on the pathway to success in their academic careers.

Interested in learning more about the Common Core and the skills that students need to succeed?

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Apr. 2, 2014 at 5:04 PM

Read the Standards

Building on the best of existing state standards, the Common Core State Standards provide clear and consistent learning goals to help prepare students for college, career, and life. The standards clearly demonstrate what students are expected to learn at each grade level, so that every parent and teacher can understand and support their learning.

The standards are:

  1. Research and evidence based
  2. Clear, understandable, and consistent
  3. Aligned with college and career expectations
  4. Based on rigorous content and the application of knowledge through higher-order thinking skills
  5. Built upon the strengths and lessons of current state standards
  6. Informed by other top-performing countries to prepare all students for success in our global economy and society

According to the best available evidence, the mastery of each standard is essential for success in college, career, and life in today’s global economy.

With students, parents, and teachers all on the same page and working together toward shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from high school prepared to succeed in college, career, and life.

The standards focus on core concepts and procedures starting in the early grades, which gives teachers the time needed to teach them and gives students the time needed to master them.

The standards draw on the most important international models, as well as research and input from numerous sources, including educators from kindergarten through college, state departments of education, scholars, assessment developers, professional organizations, parents and students, and members of the public.

Because their design and content have been refined through successive drafts and numerous rounds of state feedback, the standards represent a synthesis of the best elements of standards-related work in all states and other countries to date.

For grades K-8, grade-by-grade standards exist in English language arts/literacy and mathematics. For grades 9-12, the standards are grouped into grade bands of 9-10 grade standards and 11-12 grade standards.

While the standards set grade-specific goals, they do not define how the standards should be taught or which materials should be used to support students. States and districts recognize that there will need to be a range of supports in place to ensure that all students, including those with special needs and English language learners, can master the standards. It is up to the states to define the full range of supports appropriate for these students.

No set of grade-specific standards can fully reflect the great variety of abilities, needs, learning rates, and achievement levels of students in any given classroom. Importantly, the standards provide clear signposts along the way to the goal of college and career readiness for all students.

Texor
by Platinum Member on Apr. 2, 2014 at 5:04 PM

And there are going to be plenty of people who tell you that THIS site is biased, which is why I did not post it. 

Quoting Anonymous:

HERE is the website for common core, and all questions can be answered

http://www.corestandards.org/

rather than an MSM article


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