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Do teachers treat children differently based on their parents?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 61 Replies
1 mom liked this
I feel that some teachers will look at a parent and judge them and assume this or that. And because of that will treat the kid based on that. It is discrimation and its wrong.
Posted by Anonymous on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:34 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Constant_Reader
by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:39 AM
1 mom liked this
It is wrong but probably happens more than anyone would like to admit.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:42 AM
I feel like my sons pre k teacher is warmer to the kids whose parents she likes. She doesn't like us, so she isn't super sweet with my son. She isn't mean to him or anything, it's just very obvious who her favorites are. I don't think he can tell, which is what really matters I guess, but I don't care for it.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:43 AM
Exactly i have notice it also. But when my kid gets a note and another child gets a verbal warning for the same behavior. That when enough is enough.
UxorQuodMatris.
by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:43 AM
I have not personally witnessed this...

Is this happening to your child, OP?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:45 AM
That is why i said judging by appearance. She doesn't know any of you personally. How can she decide who she likes or does not like?

Quoting Anonymous: I feel like my sons pre k teacher is warmer to the kids whose parents she likes. She doesn't like us, so she isn't super sweet with my son. She isn't mean to him or anything, it's just very obvious who her favorites are. I don't think he can tell, which is what really matters I guess, but I don't care for it.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:46 AM

Based on looks, I've never seen or experienced that. I do know that a teacher will not put forth any extra effort or care as much about a student that has parents that don't care about their child's education. When a teacher calls a parent to discuss issues with their child and the parents never call back or don't address the issues. When notices are sent home and are ignored, when conference meetings are made and the parent doesn't show up or shows disinterest during the meeting, etc. If the parent shows the teacher that they don't care and they aren't willing to do anything to help their child, then the teacher could feel like only doing the bare minimum for that child. Generally they aren't going to go out of their way or make a vested interest in a student that has un-caring, un-involved parents.

Foolynroo2
by on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:46 AM

working in my sons parent co-op I saw his teacher treat kids differently - but not in a bad way.

She got the perspective most don't, in that how parents relate to their kids in situations. She tended to pick up where the parent is lacking

Ifthe parent looked to be a cuddler and softie, the teacher would be a bit warmer.

If the parent wasn't affectionate, she was a bit kinder and gentler

I think it helped round the kids.


In K - his teacher treated everyone alike, so far as I could tell one day a week.


Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:50 AM
2 moms liked this

Yes, they do!

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:53 AM
Even in that situation all kids need to be treated equally. Children are not their parents. My dad was an drug addict. That does not mean i am one. The point is to treat every kid equally!

Quoting Anonymous:

Based on looks, I've never seen or experienced that. I do know that a teacher will not put forth any extra effort or care as much about a student that has parents that don't care about their child's education. When a teacher calls a parent to discuss issues with their child and the parents never call back or don't address the issues. When notices are sent home and are ignored, when conference meetings are made and the parent doesn't show up or shows disinterest during the meeting, etc. If the parent shows the teacher that they don't care and they aren't willing to do anything to help their child, then the teacher could feel like only doing the bare minimum for that child. Generally they aren't going to go out of their way or make a vested interest in a student that has un-caring, un-involved parents.

Sparklepants747
by Queen Annie on Apr. 3, 2014 at 6:54 AM

I don't think so, but if the parents are nasty and narrow minded, it's probably a struggle for them. 

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