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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Let's talk parrots

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 40 Replies
Anyone have a parrot? Tell me about them. I have the opportunity to get a macaw but I don't know much about them.
Posted by Anonymous on Apr. 5, 2014 at 4:39 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on Apr. 5, 2014 at 9:21 PM
Bump for no drama.
quickbooksworm
by Ruby Member on Apr. 5, 2014 at 9:52 PM
5 moms liked this

I worked with parrots for many years before my son was diagnosed with asthma (his asthma and our bird could not co-exist so the bird went to live with a friend).  I've handfed hatchlings and worked with rescues with issues. 

1) They are expensive.  They need to be fed quality food or they will not be healthy.  The bird should be on pellets and some seed/tree nuts.  An all seed diet will significantly shorten its lifespan. Vet bills for an exotics vet are more than taking your dog and cat in, and many people don't have access to an exotics vet, yet they are necessary.  Most vets only work on poultry in vet school so if the vet didn't go to a school with an exotics program, they may not have a clue what they are talking about.

2) Their cages must be large and they must be out a LOT.  This is a wild animal that would ordinarily have no limits to space.  They need the exercise of climbing and flapping around.  This cannot be underestimated.  Macaws have a tendency to get fat.  Fat birds can't be explained away as genetics like fat people.  There is not such thing as a genetically fat macaw.  A fat bird means their diet is off.  A fat bird will develop fatty liver disease.

3) They are loud.  Most larger parrots produce a decibel level that isn't far from a 747 engine.  No joke.  If you live in an apartment, forget it.  If you have noise ordinances, forget it.  They are loud and noisy around sunset and nothing will prevent that.  That's the sign of a healthy bird.  Most of the birds I rescued were either neglected or abused because of the noise.  I've seen many locked in dark rooms or closets inside pet carriers to try and stop it.  I know of one who was terrified of sunlight.  They don't respect nap times.  If you can't handle that, don't get a bird.

5) They will eat your house.  Birds need to be provided with a SHIT TON of toys, and these toys are not cheap (I'm talking $40 a pop).  They destroy stuff and providing toys gives something to destroy besides your walls and coffee table.  Their toys are meant to be destroyed.  They are not satisfied chewing on the same bone for a year like some dogs, they need the destruction.  In the wild, they'd be tearing up branches and cones all day that seed the rain forests.  A bored parrot will scream and possibly pull out his own feathers.  They can never be left unattended because they do like to get into stuff and tear stuff apart.  I have gone through many a computer keyboard, phones, flip flops, etc which leads me to my next point of

6) Your bird is Houdini in a feather suit and you will feel like an idiot at some point.  My ex bf spent 30 minutes coming up with an elaborate schematic of locks to keep my bird from escaping his cage only to watch the bird undo it in 5 minutes.  Most cages can be broken out of and you will need those giant clamps to put on the door.  And the doors for the food dishes if the cage has one.  They are VERY smart.  Escaping is a game to them.  And if they can't undo the locks, I've seen some take the cages apart.  And when they get out, they destroy. 

7) This is a wild animal you are bringing in your home, with emotions like a 2 year old, and a can opener on its face.  You will be bitten at some point and this will always be YOUR fault.  This is not an animal that has been domesticated for 10,000 years.  There is no such thing as temperment testing like with a dog.  They have more humanlike emotions, similar to a dolphin.   It is YOUR responsibility to keep your children safe from the bird, not to pester the bird, and to learn its body language so you steer clear.  Macaws are pretty easy to read.  Their eyes pinpoint before they bite, and they puff up.  Sometimes they'll knock your hand away with that beak.  But they usually rake instead of bite which actually hurts worse. 

8) Your bird will at some point mimic something that makes you feel like an idiot or pick up some colorful vocabulary.  I knew a bird that was owned by a biker and would cuss people out.  I have known people to run to the baby monitor or to the door to find out they are answering the bird. 

9) A bird is nothing like a dog.  Throw all dog psychology out the window.  Dogs love to make you happy, parrots don't give a shit.  You are a friend, not an alpha.  You have to earn their trust and keep it. 

10) If those things don't scare you, having a parrot is absolutely amazing.  The connection I had with my cockatoo was much deeper than I have with my dog.  I had absolute trust in that bird.  I could pick him up off the floor by letting him grab my fingers with his beak.  He sat on my shoulder (which I don't recommend because the can opener is close to your face) and I never worried.  He was in all reality, my best friend for many years.  They are so intelligent and quite emotional beings, I can't explain how different it is in a way that does it justice. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 5, 2014 at 9:58 PM

^^ i agree with most of that long ass post lol 


my mom doesn't have a macaw but she does have a double yellow headed something or other....the bird is a LOUD ASSHOLE lol he doesn't like anyone but my mom. If anyone even gets near her when he is out, he attacks (except for me, he doesn't try to bite me but i can tell by his body languauge that it makes him a little uneasy)

To be fair, my mom inherited this bird from my stepdads aunt after she died and it's clear the bird was mistreated before my mom got him. But he does yell....mostly for my mom and yes, he calls her mom..super creepy lol I like him for the most part, just dont let my stepdad around him and don't get to close. He laughs at our jokes and mocks us a lot so it can be pretty entertaining. And we think at some point he was exposed to porn of some sort because he wandered in to the bathroom when my mom was taking a shower once..he started whistling and then making some VERY obscene noises. My mom busted out her iphone and started recording the sounds he was making because she knew no one would ever believe her....CREEPY!!!

VeronicaTex
by on Apr. 5, 2014 at 10:07 PM

I never had a parrot, but a cockatiel and a parakeet...

After both of them passed away:  Woodstockie at age 21 and Bluebell at 18 we also made a decision, because of our child with Down Syndrome who can have breathing problems, to not have any more indoor pets.

I must say, they were both delightful!!!


Thank you for your great story here.

This is the best laugh I have had in a Loooooooong time!!!!

rolling on floorVeronica


Quoting quickbooksworm:

I worked with parrots for many years before my son was diagnosed with asthma (his asthma and our bird could not co-exist so the bird went to live with a friend).  I've handfed hatchlings and worked with rescues with issues. 

1) They are expensive.  They need to be fed quality food or they will not be healthy.  The bird should be on pellets and some seed/tree nuts.  An all seed diet will significantly shorten its lifespan. Vet bills for an exotics vet are more than taking your dog and cat in, and many people don't have access to an exotics vet, yet they are necessary.  Most vets only work on poultry in vet school so if the vet didn't go to a school with an exotics program, they may not have a clue what they are talking about.

2) Their cages must be large and they must be out a LOT.  This is a wild animal that would ordinarily have no limits to space.  They need the exercise of climbing and flapping around.  This cannot be underestimated.  Macaws have a tendency to get fat.  Fat birds can't be explained away as genetics like fat people.  There is not such thing as a genetically fat macaw.  A fat bird means their diet is off.  A fat bird will develop fatty liver disease.

3) They are loud.  Most larger parrots produce a decibel level that isn't far from a 747 engine.  No joke.  If you live in an apartment, forget it.  If you have noise ordinances, forget it.  They are loud and noisy around sunset and nothing will prevent that.  That's the sign of a healthy bird.  Most of the birds I rescued were either neglected or abused because of the noise.  I've seen many locked in dark rooms or closets inside pet carriers to try and stop it.  I know of one who was terrified of sunlight.  They don't respect nap times.  If you can't handle that, don't get a bird.

5) They will eat your house.  Birds need to be provided with a SHIT TON of toys, and these toys are not cheap (I'm talking $40 a pop).  They destroy stuff and providing toys gives something to destroy besides your walls and coffee table.  Their toys are meant to be destroyed.  They are not satisfied chewing on the same bone for a year like some dogs, they need the destruction.  In the wild, they'd be tearing up branches and cones all day that seed the rain forests.  A bored parrot will scream and possibly pull out his own feathers.  They can never be left unattended because they do like to get into stuff and tear stuff apart.  I have gone through many a computer keyboard, phones, flip flops, etc which leads me to my next point of

6) Your bird is Houdini in a feather suit and you will feel like an idiot at some point.  My ex bf spent 30 minutes coming up with an elaborate schematic of locks to keep my bird from escaping his cage only to watch the bird undo it in 5 minutes.  Most cages can be broken out of and you will need those giant clamps to put on the door.  And the doors for the food dishes if the cage has one.  They are VERY smart.  Escaping is a game to them.  And if they can't undo the locks, I've seen some take the cages apart.  And when they get out, they destroy. 

7) This is a wild animal you are bringing in your home, with emotions like a 2 year old, and a can opener on its face.  You will be bitten at some point and this will always be YOUR fault.  This is not an animal that has been domesticated for 10,000 years.  There is no such thing as temperment testing like with a dog.  They have more humanlike emotions, similar to a dolphin.   It is YOUR responsibility to keep your children safe from the bird, not to pester the bird, and to learn its body language so you steer clear.  Macaws are pretty easy to read.  Their eyes pinpoint before they bite, and they puff up.  Sometimes they'll knock your hand away with that beak.  But they usually rake instead of bite which actually hurts worse. 

8) Your bird will at some point mimic something that makes you feel like an idiot or pick up some colorful vocabulary.  I knew a bird that was owned by a biker and would cuss people out.  I have known people to run to the baby monitor or to the door to find out they are answering the bird. 

9) A bird is nothing like a dog.  Throw all dog psychology out the window.  Dogs love to make you happy, parrots don't give a shit.  You are a friend, not an alpha.  You have to earn their trust and keep it. 

10) If those things don't scare you, having a parrot is absolutely amazing.  The connection I had with my cockatoo was much deeper than I have with my dog.  I had absolute trust in that bird.  I could pick him up off the floor by letting him grab my fingers with his beak.  He sat on my shoulder (which I don't recommend because the can opener is close to your face) and I never worried.  He was in all reality, my best friend for many years.  They are so intelligent and quite emotional beings, I can't explain how different it is in a way that does it justice. 


quickbooksworm
by Ruby Member on Apr. 5, 2014 at 10:09 PM

Haha!  I bird sat for some people I knew who failed to tell me about their African Grey.  If they put it in a cage, it would pull out every last feather, so they let it wander and it made holes in the walls.  Anyway, I was feeding the birds one day and I heard someone blow a raspberry then proceed to say "who farted?!"  THEN, it blamed all the other pets and people on the fart LOL.  That was over 10 years ago and is still one of the strangest things that I have ever experienced.

Quoting Anonymous:

^^ i agree with most of that long ass post lol 


my mom doesn't have a macaw but she does have a double yellow headed something or other....the bird is a LOUD ASSHOLE lol he doesn't like anyone but my mom. If anyone even gets near her when he is out, he attacks (except for me, he doesn't try to bite me but i can tell by his body languauge that it makes him a little uneasy)

To be fair, my mom inherited this bird from my stepdads aunt after she died and it's clear the bird was mistreated before my mom got him. But he does yell....mostly for my mom and yes, he calls her mom..super creepy lol I like him for the most part, just dont let my stepdad around him and don't get to close. He laughs at our jokes and mocks us a lot so it can be pretty entertaining. And we think at some point he was exposed to porn of some sort because he wandered in to the bathroom when my mom was taking a shower once..he started whistling and then making some VERY obscene noises. My mom busted out her iphone and started recording the sounds he was making because she knew no one would ever believe her....CREEPY!!!


Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Apr. 5, 2014 at 10:11 PM

that is that birds saving grace.....how funny he is and a what a sarcastic asshole he can be. you just can't help but laugh. so weird to hear some of those things come out of a bird....like what?!?! we swear he must be possessed by some sort of sick, twisted spirit lol

Quoting quickbooksworm:

Haha!  I bird sat for some people I knew who failed to tell me about their African Grey.  If they put it in a cage, it would pull out every last feather, so they let it wander and it made holes in the walls.  Anyway, I was feeding the birds one day and I heard someone blow a raspberry then proceed to say "who farted?!"  THEN, it blamed all the other pets and people on the fart LOL.  That was over 10 years ago and is still one of the strangest things that I have ever experienced.

Quoting Anonymous:

^^ i agree with most of that long ass post lol 


my mom doesn't have a macaw but she does have a double yellow headed something or other....the bird is a LOUD ASSHOLE lol he doesn't like anyone but my mom. If anyone even gets near her when he is out, he attacks (except for me, he doesn't try to bite me but i can tell by his body languauge that it makes him a little uneasy)

To be fair, my mom inherited this bird from my stepdads aunt after she died and it's clear the bird was mistreated before my mom got him. But he does yell....mostly for my mom and yes, he calls her mom..super creepy lol I like him for the most part, just dont let my stepdad around him and don't get to close. He laughs at our jokes and mocks us a lot so it can be pretty entertaining. And we think at some point he was exposed to porn of some sort because he wandered in to the bathroom when my mom was taking a shower once..he started whistling and then making some VERY obscene noises. My mom busted out her iphone and started recording the sounds he was making because she knew no one would ever believe her....CREEPY!!!



VeronicaTex
by on Apr. 5, 2014 at 10:14 PM

Still laughing!!!!!!

Veronica

Quoting quickbooksworm:

Haha!  I bird sat for some people I knew who failed to tell me about their African Grey.  If they put it in a cage, it would pull out every last feather, so they let it wander and it made holes in the walls.  Anyway, I was feeding the birds one day and I heard someone blow a raspberry then proceed to say "who farted?!"  THEN, it blamed all the other pets and people on the fart LOL.  That was over 10 years ago and is still one of the strangest things that I have ever experienced.

Quoting Anonymous:

^^ i agree with most of that long ass post lol 


my mom doesn't have a macaw but she does have a double yellow headed something or other....the bird is a LOUD ASSHOLE lol he doesn't like anyone but my mom. If anyone even gets near her when he is out, he attacks (except for me, he doesn't try to bite me but i can tell by his body languauge that it makes him a little uneasy)

To be fair, my mom inherited this bird from my stepdads aunt after she died and it's clear the bird was mistreated before my mom got him. But he does yell....mostly for my mom and yes, he calls her mom..super creepy lol I like him for the most part, just dont let my stepdad around him and don't get to close. He laughs at our jokes and mocks us a lot so it can be pretty entertaining. And we think at some point he was exposed to porn of some sort because he wandered in to the bathroom when my mom was taking a shower once..he started whistling and then making some VERY obscene noises. My mom busted out her iphone and started recording the sounds he was making because she knew no one would ever believe her....CREEPY!!!



quickbooksworm
by Ruby Member on Apr. 5, 2014 at 10:17 PM
1 mom liked this

My mom had this bird when I was a kid that picked up her saying "hurry up, Jen".  I think that was the reason she didn't get rid of him.  Damn bird rushed me every morning LOL.

Quoting Anonymous:

that is that birds saving grace.....how funny he is and a what a sarcastic asshole he can be. you just can't help but laugh. so weird to hear some of those things come out of a bird....like what?!?! we swear he must be possessed by some sort of sick, twisted spirit lol

Quoting quickbooksworm:

Haha!  I bird sat for some people I knew who failed to tell me about their African Grey.  If they put it in a cage, it would pull out every last feather, so they let it wander and it made holes in the walls.  Anyway, I was feeding the birds one day and I heard someone blow a raspberry then proceed to say "who farted?!"  THEN, it blamed all the other pets and people on the fart LOL.  That was over 10 years ago and is still one of the strangest things that I have ever experienced.

Quoting Anonymous:

^^ i agree with most of that long ass post lol 


my mom doesn't have a macaw but she does have a double yellow headed something or other....the bird is a LOUD ASSHOLE lol he doesn't like anyone but my mom. If anyone even gets near her when he is out, he attacks (except for me, he doesn't try to bite me but i can tell by his body languauge that it makes him a little uneasy)

To be fair, my mom inherited this bird from my stepdads aunt after she died and it's clear the bird was mistreated before my mom got him. But he does yell....mostly for my mom and yes, he calls her mom..super creepy lol I like him for the most part, just dont let my stepdad around him and don't get to close. He laughs at our jokes and mocks us a lot so it can be pretty entertaining. And we think at some point he was exposed to porn of some sort because he wandered in to the bathroom when my mom was taking a shower once..he started whistling and then making some VERY obscene noises. My mom busted out her iphone and started recording the sounds he was making because she knew no one would ever believe her....CREEPY!!!



quickbooksworm
by Ruby Member on Apr. 5, 2014 at 10:18 PM

Cockatiels and parakeets are parrots, just tiny ones :)

Quoting VeronicaTex:

I never had a parrot, but a cockatiel and a parakeet...

After both of them passed away:  Woodstockie at age 21 and Bluebell at 18 we also made a decision, because of our child with Down Syndrome who can have breathing problems, to not have any more indoor pets.

I must say, they were both delightful!!!

Thank you for your great story here.

This is the best laugh I have had in a Loooooooong time!!!!

rolling on floorVeronica

Quoting quickbooksworm:

I worked with parrots for many years before my son was diagnosed with asthma (his asthma and our bird could not co-exist so the bird went to live with a friend).  I've handfed hatchlings and worked with rescues with issues. 

1) They are expensive.  They need to be fed quality food or they will not be healthy.  The bird should be on pellets and some seed/tree nuts.  An all seed diet will significantly shorten its lifespan. Vet bills for an exotics vet are more than taking your dog and cat in, and many people don't have access to an exotics vet, yet they are necessary.  Most vets only work on poultry in vet school so if the vet didn't go to a school with an exotics program, they may not have a clue what they are talking about.

2) Their cages must be large and they must be out a LOT.  This is a wild animal that would ordinarily have no limits to space.  They need the exercise of climbing and flapping around.  This cannot be underestimated.  Macaws have a tendency to get fat.  Fat birds can't be explained away as genetics like fat people.  There is not such thing as a genetically fat macaw.  A fat bird means their diet is off.  A fat bird will develop fatty liver disease.

3) They are loud.  Most larger parrots produce a decibel level that isn't far from a 747 engine.  No joke.  If you live in an apartment, forget it.  If you have noise ordinances, forget it.  They are loud and noisy around sunset and nothing will prevent that.  That's the sign of a healthy bird.  Most of the birds I rescued were either neglected or abused because of the noise.  I've seen many locked in dark rooms or closets inside pet carriers to try and stop it.  I know of one who was terrified of sunlight.  They don't respect nap times.  If you can't handle that, don't get a bird.

5) They will eat your house.  Birds need to be provided with a SHIT TON of toys, and these toys are not cheap (I'm talking $40 a pop).  They destroy stuff and providing toys gives something to destroy besides your walls and coffee table.  Their toys are meant to be destroyed.  They are not satisfied chewing on the same bone for a year like some dogs, they need the destruction.  In the wild, they'd be tearing up branches and cones all day that seed the rain forests.  A bored parrot will scream and possibly pull out his own feathers.  They can never be left unattended because they do like to get into stuff and tear stuff apart.  I have gone through many a computer keyboard, phones, flip flops, etc which leads me to my next point of

6) Your bird is Houdini in a feather suit and you will feel like an idiot at some point.  My ex bf spent 30 minutes coming up with an elaborate schematic of locks to keep my bird from escaping his cage only to watch the bird undo it in 5 minutes.  Most cages can be broken out of and you will need those giant clamps to put on the door.  And the doors for the food dishes if the cage has one.  They are VERY smart.  Escaping is a game to them.  And if they can't undo the locks, I've seen some take the cages apart.  And when they get out, they destroy. 

7) This is a wild animal you are bringing in your home, with emotions like a 2 year old, and a can opener on its face.  You will be bitten at some point and this will always be YOUR fault.  This is not an animal that has been domesticated for 10,000 years.  There is no such thing as temperment testing like with a dog.  They have more humanlike emotions, similar to a dolphin.   It is YOUR responsibility to keep your children safe from the bird, not to pester the bird, and to learn its body language so you steer clear.  Macaws are pretty easy to read.  Their eyes pinpoint before they bite, and they puff up.  Sometimes they'll knock your hand away with that beak.  But they usually rake instead of bite which actually hurts worse. 

8) Your bird will at some point mimic something that makes you feel like an idiot or pick up some colorful vocabulary.  I knew a bird that was owned by a biker and would cuss people out.  I have known people to run to the baby monitor or to the door to find out they are answering the bird. 

9) A bird is nothing like a dog.  Throw all dog psychology out the window.  Dogs love to make you happy, parrots don't give a shit.  You are a friend, not an alpha.  You have to earn their trust and keep it. 

10) If those things don't scare you, having a parrot is absolutely amazing.  The connection I had with my cockatoo was much deeper than I have with my dog.  I had absolute trust in that bird.  I could pick him up off the floor by letting him grab my fingers with his beak.  He sat on my shoulder (which I don't recommend because the can opener is close to your face) and I never worried.  He was in all reality, my best friend for many years.  They are so intelligent and quite emotional beings, I can't explain how different it is in a way that does it justice. 


VeronicaTex
by on Apr. 5, 2014 at 10:20 PM

I know.  They were just the sweetest things....most of the time. ;)

Veronica

Quoting quickbooksworm:

Cockatiels and parakeets are parrots, just tiny ones :)

Quoting VeronicaTex:

I never had a parrot, but a cockatiel and a parakeet...

After both of them passed away:  Woodstockie at age 21 and Bluebell at 18 we also made a decision, because of our child with Down Syndrome who can have breathing problems, to not have any more indoor pets.

I must say, they were both delightful!!!

Thank you for your great story here.

This is the best laugh I have had in a Loooooooong time!!!!

rolling on floorVeronica

Quoting quickbooksworm:

I worked with parrots for many years before my son was diagnosed with asthma (his asthma and our bird could not co-exist so the bird went to live with a friend).  I've handfed hatchlings and worked with rescues with issues. 

1) They are expensive.  They need to be fed quality food or they will not be healthy.  The bird should be on pellets and some seed/tree nuts.  An all seed diet will significantly shorten its lifespan. Vet bills for an exotics vet are more than taking your dog and cat in, and many people don't have access to an exotics vet, yet they are necessary.  Most vets only work on poultry in vet school so if the vet didn't go to a school with an exotics program, they may not have a clue what they are talking about.

2) Their cages must be large and they must be out a LOT.  This is a wild animal that would ordinarily have no limits to space.  They need the exercise of climbing and flapping around.  This cannot be underestimated.  Macaws have a tendency to get fat.  Fat birds can't be explained away as genetics like fat people.  There is not such thing as a genetically fat macaw.  A fat bird means their diet is off.  A fat bird will develop fatty liver disease.

3) They are loud.  Most larger parrots produce a decibel level that isn't far from a 747 engine.  No joke.  If you live in an apartment, forget it.  If you have noise ordinances, forget it.  They are loud and noisy around sunset and nothing will prevent that.  That's the sign of a healthy bird.  Most of the birds I rescued were either neglected or abused because of the noise.  I've seen many locked in dark rooms or closets inside pet carriers to try and stop it.  I know of one who was terrified of sunlight.  They don't respect nap times.  If you can't handle that, don't get a bird.

5) They will eat your house.  Birds need to be provided with a SHIT TON of toys, and these toys are not cheap (I'm talking $40 a pop).  They destroy stuff and providing toys gives something to destroy besides your walls and coffee table.  Their toys are meant to be destroyed.  They are not satisfied chewing on the same bone for a year like some dogs, they need the destruction.  In the wild, they'd be tearing up branches and cones all day that seed the rain forests.  A bored parrot will scream and possibly pull out his own feathers.  They can never be left unattended because they do like to get into stuff and tear stuff apart.  I have gone through many a computer keyboard, phones, flip flops, etc which leads me to my next point of

6) Your bird is Houdini in a feather suit and you will feel like an idiot at some point.  My ex bf spent 30 minutes coming up with an elaborate schematic of locks to keep my bird from escaping his cage only to watch the bird undo it in 5 minutes.  Most cages can be broken out of and you will need those giant clamps to put on the door.  And the doors for the food dishes if the cage has one.  They are VERY smart.  Escaping is a game to them.  And if they can't undo the locks, I've seen some take the cages apart.  And when they get out, they destroy. 

7) This is a wild animal you are bringing in your home, with emotions like a 2 year old, and a can opener on its face.  You will be bitten at some point and this will always be YOUR fault.  This is not an animal that has been domesticated for 10,000 years.  There is no such thing as temperment testing like with a dog.  They have more humanlike emotions, similar to a dolphin.   It is YOUR responsibility to keep your children safe from the bird, not to pester the bird, and to learn its body language so you steer clear.  Macaws are pretty easy to read.  Their eyes pinpoint before they bite, and they puff up.  Sometimes they'll knock your hand away with that beak.  But they usually rake instead of bite which actually hurts worse. 

8) Your bird will at some point mimic something that makes you feel like an idiot or pick up some colorful vocabulary.  I knew a bird that was owned by a biker and would cuss people out.  I have known people to run to the baby monitor or to the door to find out they are answering the bird. 

9) A bird is nothing like a dog.  Throw all dog psychology out the window.  Dogs love to make you happy, parrots don't give a shit.  You are a friend, not an alpha.  You have to earn their trust and keep it. 

10) If those things don't scare you, having a parrot is absolutely amazing.  The connection I had with my cockatoo was much deeper than I have with my dog.  I had absolute trust in that bird.  I could pick him up off the floor by letting him grab my fingers with his beak.  He sat on my shoulder (which I don't recommend because the can opener is close to your face) and I never worried.  He was in all reality, my best friend for many years.  They are so intelligent and quite emotional beings, I can't explain how different it is in a way that does it justice. 



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