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special needs kids playing sports

Posted by Anonymous   + Show Post
Im wondering, if you have a special needs child how do you decide whether to enroll them in the special needs programs or the regular ones.

I ask because both of my kids have special needs kids on their baseball teams. They are great kids we love knowing them.

However its very difficult to run a game with these kids playing. One child is 8 and the other is 11 or 12, m not sure.

The kids get aggrevated, the other kids on the field do the best they can to not get aggrevated. But theyre kids, and all they want to do is play baseball.

Its certainly a fine line and we're all trying to walk it, but at what point do you just use the other things offered?

Posted by Anonymous on Apr. 30, 2014 at 4:29 PM
Replies (21-30):
VeronicaTex
by on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:22 PM

My daughter with Down Syndrome was in Special Olympics: Running and Throwing a ball, but the best thing that has happened for her is having Special Adaptive Aquatics (swimming) with a Private Instructor three times a week.

Veronica 

ilovemyson2002
by Member on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:25 PM

my son was in scoccer 2 times he play with other kids that r not like him he is delay and has adhd and odd  but he wouldnt play soccer at all just stood there  and then one time got hit in the nose so we dont put him in sports only boy scouts  

libsterdoodle
by Bronze Member on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:29 PM
1 mom liked this

Well, my question would be is this a school sponsored team, is it recreational or it is divisional and pay-to-play?  If it is school sponsored and it is from the general school population they have a right to play.  If it is recreational then it is designed to be a fun experience for kids and is less focussed on the competition and more designed to teach the kids how to play and how to be a part of a team.  If it is a divisional pay-to-play scenario it is competition based, and I don't think that it is fair to include special needs kids that will hurt the team standings.  I am a volunteer coach for our city's recreational soccer teams.  I started doing it a couple of years ago because there was a shortage of coaches and if there were no volunteers my son's team would have been without a coach.  I enjoyed it so much that I have kept with it.  I have had a special needs kid on my team a few times and I find it a pleasure.  It is a great learning opportunity for the kids, it helps the student in question and it allows for community support and involvement.

Teooper1
by on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:35 PM
Awesome that these children learned a very important life lesson much more important than a game ! The parents if these children must be doing a great job!

Quoting lancet98:

 


The kids vary as to disability, awareness of the attitudes of others, and in many other ways, so I don't think your question is one anyone can answer.


Many kids with intellectual disabilities don't understand that other kids are annoyed by them, that they are being annoying, or that they're 'different'.   They just go on moment to moment, day to day.   Many of the kids I cared for forgot any 'tantrums' or frustrations they had, very quickly, and weren't upset about their own mistakes for long.


Many of the kids I cared for were not at all 'turned off' if they couldn't participate exactly way other kids could.   Their parents might have pulled them out due to being overly sensitive about it themselves - the kids don't ALWAYS annoy EVERYONE who's participating.


My friend's little son just took a kid with autism, off to one side and taught him how to hit a t-ball.   He did that for a little while and then one of the other boys took over, so they all got a chance to practice and do their own thing AND help the SN kid. When they had all had a turn they brought him back to his mom, everyone was happy.


Sometimes, when left to their own devices kids will bully or hassle a SN kid.   And sometimes they won't.


But quite often, the parents of both the SN kid AND the non sn kids, are far more hypersensitive about it than the kids are.


 


Quoting Anonymous: I wonder though, does it make him feel normal, or exaggerate that hes different?
Quoting catcameback:

Maybe they want him to feel normal.  Who knows?


When ds was young the physical differences were that big.  As he's gotten older it's become harder because they other children have improved their motor skills and coordination, while he has not.  


 


Quoting Anonymous: Thats especially true with the older boy. I can see how frustrated he is about not being able to do what the other kids do...why dont his parents see it?
Quoting catcameback:

Depends on the kid and how much they can handle and what the sport is.  I enrolled ds in regular baseball and that worked out well except that he hated ever moment of it.


I enrolled him in basketball and that was a disaster, it was a huge blow to his self confidance.  He just could not keep up with the NT kids.


 


 

blahblahblah86
by Bronze Member on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:37 PM
1 mom liked this
My son with Aspergers has been in the miracle league baseball program and it was awesome. But he was very impatient and only played two innings per game. Im so glad this exists and he can participate in a team sport but that is the ONLY sport with special needs available in our county. So if I wanted him to try different sports that he was interested in I would consult the coach and see how the interactions go and if and when he gets overwhelmed and ready to quit we would pull him out of the game and have him try again. People need to learn that its not a simple process and not every child is the same. Not every day is the same. It would probably benefit you and the other children with special needs to be more understanding accommodating and uplifting. Get to know them and encourage them to do better. They already feel singled out and frustrated so why not be more adaptive to them because they are adapting to non special needs people too.
squeekers
by Platinum Member on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:38 PM

 My neice played in a Challenger baseball league, in St Louis MO, for a number of years. http://www.gochallengers.org/

Anonymous
by Anonymous 5 on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:41 PM
2 moms liked this

My DS is SN. He plays soccer and is just happy to participate. I expect him to be a good sportsman just like any other kid and he is. The fine line is teaching all kids, not just SN.

And BTW, my SN DS can spell AGGRAVATED.

armywifey1983
by Gold Member on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:41 PM

It really depends on the kid. Do they understand the rules? What's expected of them? Can they physically play the game and keep up with the other athletes? Can they emotionally handle wins, losses, the excitement of the game? If they can't (and this goes for ANY child, not just special needs) do one or more of these things, they shouldn't be playing that particular sport.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:45 PM
I dont really know how theyre all different. They are town teans with our tec department which is pay to play.

Well of course they have the right to play, however is it fair to them and the rest of the team?

Baseball is a competitive sport. The game is completely focused on winning. Winning is the goal. Especially at the 11yo level. There are standings play offs, a champion.



Quoting libsterdoodle:

Well, my question would be is this a school sponsored team, is it recreational or it is divisional and pay-to-play?  If it is school sponsored and it is from the general school population they have a right to play.  If it is recreational then it is designed to be a fun experience for kids and is less focussed on the competition and more designed to teach the kids how to play and how to be a part of a team.  If it is a divisional pay-to-play scenario it is competition based, and I don't think that it is fair to include special needs kids that will hurt the team standings.  I am a volunteer coach for our city's recreational soccer teams.  I started doing it a couple of years ago because there was a shortage of coaches and if there were no volunteers my son's team would have been without a coach.  I enjoyed it so much that I have kept with it.  I have had a special needs kid on my team a few times and I find it a pleasure.  It is a great learning opportunity for the kids, it helps the student in question and it allows for community support and involvement.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Apr. 30, 2014 at 7:47 PM
We have that league here too.

Quoting squeekers:

 My neice played in a Challenger baseball league, in St Louis MO, for a number of years. http://www.gochallengers.org/

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