Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

Would you go?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 21 Replies

I fell asleep outside this afternoon. I started out in the shade. 2 hours later DF comes out and wakes me and tells me to go to bed. I was very hot and restless.

I have no idea how long I was in the sun but I am super sunburned. I have a horrible headache, my stomach is upset, I can't stop trembling, everything looks more intense, I can't drink enough water, my urine is very dark and smells funny.

I'm at work right now but was wondering if I should go to the ER when I get off.

Would you go? I think I might have sun poisoning :(


I drank a lot of water and took 2 Motrin. I'm not feeling 100% but the nausea is almost gone. Pounding headache, shakiness, hyper sensitivty, and pain in the burn area (which is expected) haven't changed much. I'm going to take a nap soon and if it's not better I'll be going to get rehydrated.

Posted by Anonymous on May. 9, 2014 at 3:15 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on May. 9, 2014 at 3:17 AM

Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning doesn't really mean you've been poisoned. It is often the term used for a severe case of sunburn. This is usually a burn from ultraviolet (UV) radiation that inflames your skin.

Symptoms of Sun Poisoning

Within just 15 minutes of being in the sun, you can be sunburned. But you might not know it right away. The redness and discomfort might not show up a few hours.

You can become severely sunburned if you stay in the sun a long time and don't wear protection. You are more likely to sunburn if you have light skin and fair hair.

Severe sunburn or sun poisoning can cause symptoms such as the following:

  • Skin redness and blistering
  • Pain and tingling
  • Swelling
  • Headache
  • Fever and chills
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • Dehydration

Treating Sun Poisoning

 For severe sunburn, these simple remedies usually do the trick:

  • Get out of the sun.
  • Take a cool (not cold) shower or bath or apply cool compresses.
  • Drink extra fluids for a few days.
  • Take ibuprofen or acetaminophen to relieve pain.
  • Use aloe gel or a moisturizer.
  • Completely cover sunburned areas when going outside.

Seek immediate medical care for these symptoms:

  • A sunburn that forms blisters, covers a large area, or is very painful
  • Facial swelling
  • Fever and chills
  • Upset stomach
  • Headache, confusion, or faintness
  • Signs of dehydration

Preventing Sun Poisoning

Follow the basics of sun safety:

  • Wear a sunscreen that has an SPF of at least 30 and says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means that it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Put it on all over about 15 to 30 minutes before going out in the sun. Reapply at least every two hours and after you've been in the water or sweating.
  • Limit your sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and remember that water, snow, and sand can intensify the sun's damaging rays.
  • Wear sunglasses, a hat, and protective clothing.

Check on your medications. Ask your doctor if anything you take might make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. For example, some acne medications, antibiotics, antidepressants, diuretics, heart drugs, and birth control pills make skin more sensitive. So can some antibacterial medications and fragrances that go on your skin.

 

Other Types of Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning may also refer to two types of reactions to sunlight:

Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE). PMLE is a reaction that does not appear to be linked to drugs or diseases. It happens in people who are at risk and who are exposed to intense sunlight that they're not used to. For example, people living in northern climates could experience this if taking a winter vacation in a tropical climate.

Symptoms are a severe skin rash, usually appearing several hours after going out in the sun. The rash may be itchy and include:

  • Small bumps over the sun-exposed areas of the body
  • Dense clumps of bumps
  • Hives, usually on the arms, lower legs, and chest

Sun Poisoning

Other Types of Sun Poisoning continued...

An inherited form of PMLE occurs in Native Americans. It can last from spring until fall. Symptoms at first include redness, burning, and itching, which usually last two or three days but can persist for weeks. Other symptoms may begin within a few hours of sun exposure but go away in a few hours. They include:

  • Fatigue
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Nausea

Treatment for PMLE depends on its severity. Other than staying out of the sun and protecting yourself when you are in the sun, you may not need treatment. The rash can clear by itself within seven to 10 days.

Solar urticaria. Symptoms may develop within minutes of exposure to sun. If large areas of skin are involved, symptoms may include:

  • Itchiness
  • Redness
  • Raised areas on the skin (wheals) or blisters
  • Wheezing
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness

Although the blisters usually go away within hours, you may experience the reaction off and on throughout the years. Antihistamines can treat some cases, but see your doctor for advice.

Other treatment or prevention for PMLE or solar urticaria may include:

  • Steroids that go on your skin
  • Sunscreen that says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB radiation
  • Phototherapy with psoralen UV light (PUVA) to desensitize skin to UV light

 

Ray-of-Beezy
by Silver Member on May. 9, 2014 at 3:19 AM
Absolutely.
Brandibee_5
by Bronze Member on May. 9, 2014 at 3:19 AM
I would just to be sure.
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 9, 2014 at 3:19 AM

I highlighted my symptoms. It's been 13 or so hours since I got out of the sun and I'm not feeling any better.

Quoting Sassy762:

Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning doesn't really mean you've been poisoned. It is often the term used for a severe case of sunburn. This is usually a burn from ultraviolet (UV) radiation that inflames your skin.

Symptoms of Sun Poisoning

Within just 15 minutes of being in the sun, you can be sunburned. But you might not know it right away. The redness and discomfort might not show up a few hours.

You can become severely sunburned if you stay in the sun a long time and don't wear protection. You are more likely to sunburn if you have light skin and fair hair.

Severe sunburn or sun poisoning can cause symptoms such as the following:

  • Skin redness and blistering
  • Pain and tingling
  • Swelling
  • Headache
  • Fever and chills
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • Dehydration (possibly?)

Treating Sun Poisoning

 For severe sunburn, these simple remedies usually do the trick:

  • Get out of the sun.
  • Take a cool (not cold) shower or bath or apply cool compresses.
  • Drink extra fluids for a few days.
  • Take ibuprofen or acetaminophen to relieve pain.
  • Use aloe gel or a moisturizer.
  • Completely cover sunburned areas when going outside.

Seek immediate medical care for these symptoms:

  • A sunburn that forms blisters, covers a large area, or is very painful
  • Facial swelling
  • Fever and chills
  • Upset stomach
  • Headache, confusion, or faintness
  • Signs of dehydration

Preventing Sun Poisoning

Follow the basics of sun safety:

  • Wear a sunscreen that has an SPF of at least 30 and says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means that it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Put it on all over about 15 to 30 minutes before going out in the sun. Reapply at least every two hours and after you've been in the water or sweating.
  • Limit your sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and remember that water, snow, and sand can intensify the sun's damaging rays.
  • Wear sunglasses, a hat, and protective clothing.

Check on your medications. Ask your doctor if anything you take might make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. For example, some acne medications, antibiotics, antidepressants, diuretics, heart drugs, and birth control pills make skin more sensitive. So can some antibacterial medications and fragrances that go on your skin.


Other Types of Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning may also refer to two types of reactions to sunlight:

Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE). PMLE is a reaction that does not appear to be linked to drugs or diseases. It happens in people who are at risk and who are exposed to intense sunlight that they're not used to. For example, people living in northern climates could experience this if taking a winter vacation in a tropical climate.

Symptoms are a severe skin rash, usually appearing several hours after going out in the sun. The rash may be itchy and include:

  • Small bumps over the sun-exposed areas of the body
  • Dense clumps of bumps
  • Hives, usually on the arms, lower legs, and chest

Sun Poisoning

Other Types of Sun Poisoning continued...

An inherited form of PMLE occurs in Native Americans. It can last from spring until fall. Symptoms at first include redness, burning, and itching, which usually last two or three days but can persist for weeks. Other symptoms may begin within a few hours of sun exposure but go away in a few hours. They include:

  • Fatigue
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Nausea

Treatment for PMLE depends on its severity. Other than staying out of the sun and protecting yourself when you are in the sun, you may not need treatment. The rash can clear by itself within seven to 10 days.

Solar urticaria. Symptoms may develop within minutes of exposure to sun. If large areas of skin are involved, symptoms may include:

  • Itchiness
  • Redness
  • Raised areas on the skin (wheals) or blisters
  • Wheezing
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness

Although the blisters usually go away within hours, you may experience the reaction off and on throughout the years. Antihistamines can treat some cases, but see your doctor for advice.

Other treatment or prevention for PMLE or solar urticaria may include:

  • Steroids that go on your skin
  • Sunscreen that says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB radiation
  • Phototherapy with psoralen UV light (PUVA) to desensitize skin to UV light



drowningmama
by Platinum Member on May. 9, 2014 at 3:20 AM
1 mom liked this
I'd got to er. They can rehydrate you. I got sun poisoning. They rehydrated me and gave me a steroid. Then I went home to suffer!! But go - you need hydration!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on May. 9, 2014 at 3:22 AM

You should go to the ER just to be safe. Hope you feel better soon

Quoting Anonymous:

I highlighted my symptoms. It's been 13 or so hours since I got out of the sun and I'm not feeling any better.

Quoting Sassy762:

Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning doesn't really mean you've been poisoned. It is often the term used for a severe case of sunburn. This is usually a burn from ultraviolet (UV) radiation that inflames your skin.

Symptoms of Sun Poisoning

Within just 15 minutes of being in the sun, you can be sunburned. But you might not know it right away. The redness and discomfort might not show up a few hours.

You can become severely sunburned if you stay in the sun a long time and don't wear protection. You are more likely to sunburn if you have light skin and fair hair.

Severe sunburn or sun poisoning can cause symptoms such as the following:

  • Skin redness and blistering
  • Pain and tingling
  • Swelling
  • Headache
  • Fever and chills
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • Dehydration (possibly?)

Treating Sun Poisoning

 For severe sunburn, these simple remedies usually do the trick:

  • Get out of the sun.
  • Take a cool (not cold) shower or bath or apply cool compresses.
  • Drink extra fluids for a few days.
  • Take ibuprofen or acetaminophen to relieve pain.
  • Use aloe gel or a moisturizer.
  • Completely cover sunburned areas when going outside.

Seek immediate medical care for these symptoms:

  • A sunburn that forms blisters, covers a large area, or is very painful
  • Facial swelling
  • Fever and chills
  • Upset stomach
  • Headache, confusion, or faintness
  • Signs of dehydration

Preventing Sun Poisoning

Follow the basics of sun safety:

  • Wear a sunscreen that has an SPF of at least 30 and says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means that it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Put it on all over about 15 to 30 minutes before going out in the sun. Reapply at least every two hours and after you've been in the water or sweating.
  • Limit your sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and remember that water, snow, and sand can intensify the sun's damaging rays.
  • Wear sunglasses, a hat, and protective clothing.

Check on your medications. Ask your doctor if anything you take might make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. For example, some acne medications, antibiotics, antidepressants, diuretics, heart drugs, and birth control pills make skin more sensitive. So can some antibacterial medications and fragrances that go on your skin.


Other Types of Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning may also refer to two types of reactions to sunlight:

Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE). PMLE is a reaction that does not appear to be linked to drugs or diseases. It happens in people who are at risk and who are exposed to intense sunlight that they're not used to. For example, people living in northern climates could experience this if taking a winter vacation in a tropical climate.

Symptoms are a severe skin rash, usually appearing several hours after going out in the sun. The rash may be itchy and include:

  • Small bumps over the sun-exposed areas of the body
  • Dense clumps of bumps
  • Hives, usually on the arms, lower legs, and chest

Sun Poisoning

Other Types of Sun Poisoning continued...

An inherited form of PMLE occurs in Native Americans. It can last from spring until fall. Symptoms at first include redness, burning, and itching, which usually last two or three days but can persist for weeks. Other symptoms may begin within a few hours of sun exposure but go away in a few hours. They include:

  • Fatigue
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Nausea

Treatment for PMLE depends on its severity. Other than staying out of the sun and protecting yourself when you are in the sun, you may not need treatment. The rash can clear by itself within seven to 10 days.

Solar urticaria. Symptoms may develop within minutes of exposure to sun. If large areas of skin are involved, symptoms may include:

  • Itchiness
  • Redness
  • Raised areas on the skin (wheals) or blisters
  • Wheezing
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness

Although the blisters usually go away within hours, you may experience the reaction off and on throughout the years. Antihistamines can treat some cases, but see your doctor for advice.

Other treatment or prevention for PMLE or solar urticaria may include:

  • Steroids that go on your skin
  • Sunscreen that says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB radiation
  • Phototherapy with psoralen UV light (PUVA) to desensitize skin to UV light




Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 9, 2014 at 3:22 AM

I can't do anything until I get off work in about 4 hours or so.

Quoting drowningmama: I'd got to er. They can rehydrate you. I got sun poisoning. They rehydrated me and gave me a steroid. Then I went home to suffer!! But go - you need hydration!


Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 9, 2014 at 3:26 AM

So do I :( I feel horrible. Almost like I have the flu or something. I tried to eat and thought I was going to throw up.

Quoting Sassy762:

You should go to the ER just to be safe. Hope you feel better soon

Quoting Anonymous:

I highlighted my symptoms. It's been 13 or so hours since I got out of the sun and I'm not feeling any better.

Quoting Sassy762:

Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning doesn't really mean you've been poisoned. It is often the term used for a severe case of sunburn. This is usually a burn from ultraviolet (UV) radiation that inflames your skin.

Symptoms of Sun Poisoning

Within just 15 minutes of being in the sun, you can be sunburned. But you might not know it right away. The redness and discomfort might not show up a few hours.

You can become severely sunburned if you stay in the sun a long time and don't wear protection. You are more likely to sunburn if you have light skin and fair hair.

Severe sunburn or sun poisoning can cause symptoms such as the following:

  • Skin redness and blistering
  • Pain and tingling
  • Swelling
  • Headache
  • Fever and chills
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • Dehydration (possibly?)

Treating Sun Poisoning

 For severe sunburn, these simple remedies usually do the trick:

  • Get out of the sun.
  • Take a cool (not cold) shower or bath or apply cool compresses.
  • Drink extra fluids for a few days.
  • Take ibuprofen or acetaminophen to relieve pain.
  • Use aloe gel or a moisturizer.
  • Completely cover sunburned areas when going outside.

Seek immediate medical care for these symptoms:

  • A sunburn that forms blisters, covers a large area, or is very painful
  • Facial swelling
  • Fever and chills
  • Upset stomach
  • Headache, confusion, or faintness
  • Signs of dehydration

Preventing Sun Poisoning

Follow the basics of sun safety:

  • Wear a sunscreen that has an SPF of at least 30 and says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means that it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB rays. Put it on all over about 15 to 30 minutes before going out in the sun. Reapply at least every two hours and after you've been in the water or sweating.
  • Limit your sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and remember that water, snow, and sand can intensify the sun's damaging rays.
  • Wear sunglasses, a hat, and protective clothing.

Check on your medications. Ask your doctor if anything you take might make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. For example, some acne medications, antibiotics, antidepressants, diuretics, heart drugs, and birth control pills make skin more sensitive. So can some antibacterial medications and fragrances that go on your skin.


Other Types of Sun Poisoning

Sun poisoning may also refer to two types of reactions to sunlight:

Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE). PMLE is a reaction that does not appear to be linked to drugs or diseases. It happens in people who are at risk and who are exposed to intense sunlight that they're not used to. For example, people living in northern climates could experience this if taking a winter vacation in a tropical climate.

Symptoms are a severe skin rash, usually appearing several hours after going out in the sun. The rash may be itchy and include:

  • Small bumps over the sun-exposed areas of the body
  • Dense clumps of bumps
  • Hives, usually on the arms, lower legs, and chest

Sun Poisoning

Other Types of Sun Poisoning continued...

An inherited form of PMLE occurs in Native Americans. It can last from spring until fall. Symptoms at first include redness, burning, and itching, which usually last two or three days but can persist for weeks. Other symptoms may begin within a few hours of sun exposure but go away in a few hours. They include:

  • Fatigue
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Nausea

Treatment for PMLE depends on its severity. Other than staying out of the sun and protecting yourself when you are in the sun, you may not need treatment. The rash can clear by itself within seven to 10 days.

Solar urticaria. Symptoms may develop within minutes of exposure to sun. If large areas of skin are involved, symptoms may include:

  • Itchiness
  • Redness
  • Raised areas on the skin (wheals) or blisters
  • Wheezing
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of consciousness

Although the blisters usually go away within hours, you may experience the reaction off and on throughout the years. Antihistamines can treat some cases, but see your doctor for advice.

Other treatment or prevention for PMLE or solar urticaria may include:

  • Steroids that go on your skin
  • Sunscreen that says "broad-spectrum" on the label, which means it protects against the sun's UVA and UVB radiation
  • Phototherapy with psoralen UV light (PUVA) to desensitize skin to UV light




kodasmommie25
by Bronze Member on May. 9, 2014 at 3:26 AM
Go in just to make sure you don't want to be worrying on top of it
heckno
by Bronze Member on May. 9, 2014 at 3:30 AM
At this point I'd go in.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)