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Mom Confessions Mom Confessions

MD or DO- What?!

Posted by on Jun. 25, 2014 at 3:54 PM
  • 8 Replies
Which does your family see, and why?

M.D.- Medical Doctor
D.O.- Doctor of Osteopathy

Both attend med school and are legit doctors, I'm just not clear on what the difference is when it comes to treatment.
by on Jun. 25, 2014 at 3:54 PM
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Replies (1-8):
Kitty_Myrick
by Bronze Member on Jun. 25, 2014 at 3:56 PM

  I remember I Googled it once when I was looking for a new PC.  But I can't remember off the top of my head.  I think one is more in to the natural way of things maybe?????????

cat 

olivejuice2
by Silver Member on Jun. 25, 2014 at 3:59 PM
Someone told me they do adjustments similar to chiropractors, but not exactly the same. I find that confusing.

Quoting Kitty_Myrick:

  I remember I Googled it once when I was looking for a new PC.  But I can't remember off the top of my head.  I think one is more in to the natural way of things maybe?????????

cat 

smorgan865
by Ruby Member on Jun. 25, 2014 at 4:00 PM
Nurse Practitioners

We did have a family doctor MD, but switched offices. There is an MD but our visits are with the NP.

My gyno vists are with the NP at the hospital where I see my midwives for pregnancy.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Jun. 25, 2014 at 4:30 PM

 MD.  My husband. 

caustinb
by Gold Member on Jun. 25, 2014 at 4:32 PM
My doctors office has one of each. The DO does an extra course of study relating to the Skeletal/muscles/nerves is the way I understand it.
Cmgmqmmom
by Ruby Member on Jun. 25, 2014 at 4:34 PM

 I went ahead and just googled that for you.

http://www.piedmont.org/medical-care/living-better1/Your-doctor-The-difference-between-an-MD-and-DO-697.aspx

 

If you see a primary care physician for your general healthcare, there’s a chance you’re seeing a D.O., not an M.D. While both degrees mean your doctor is a licensed physician, their training differs slightly and each has a unique perspective on care. As Brian Krachman, D.O., an internal medicine specialist at Piedmont Physicians Group, explains, “A D.O. is an osteopathic physician, while an M.D. is a medical doctor, an allopathic physician.”

According to the American Osteopathic Association, doctors of osteopathic medicine regard the body as an integrated whole, rather than treating for specific symptoms only.  Allopathic medicine, also referred to as “Western medicine,” treats disease symptoms using remedies such as drugs or surgery.

Physicians with a D.O. are licensed in all 50 states to practice medicine and surgery, as well as to prescribe medications. The education for both degrees is similar and both are required to complete accredited medical residencies. 

One major difference is D.O. programs place an emphasis on primary care. “Most D.O.s are in internal medicine, family practice, pediatrics, OB-GYN and general surgery,” says Dr. Krachman. “We spend a lot of time with people. The emphasis – which we call primary care now – is on people.”

Osteopathic medical schools also require additional classes – between 300 and 500 hours – on the skeletal system and the interactions of your body with diseases. Dr. Krachman says there may be slight personality differences between physicians with each degree, as D.O.s often address medical conditions from both a medical and lifestyle perspective. D.O.s place an emphasis on getting to know a patient’s lifestyle, family and unique concerns, which better informs their medical treatments.

However, he says patients should not see much of a difference between the two in terms of medical care.

D.O.s are trained to ask questions like this to gain a comprehensive understanding of a patient’s lifestyle, which can impact their condition.   With chronic diseases like diabetes, it’s not only about the medication you’re taking, but “what are you are eating, who’s at home, how meals are prepared and who’s preparing the meals,” he says.  “It’s a supplemental layer that provides you with more opportunity to get better patient care.”

3MusketeerMama
by EmmaRye Pie on Jun. 25, 2014 at 4:37 PM

It's just a difference of training. DO 's are trained to look at the whole body as a whole and not just treat the specific problem. So if you go in with chronic headaches, they may take a look at your diet and stress levels rather than think of it as a purely physical problem. They also have been trained to do chiropractic adjustments but not all of them use that as part of their treatments. My OB-Gyn is a DO and my regular doctor is an MD. 

olivejuice2
by Silver Member on Jun. 25, 2014 at 4:59 PM
Thanks, that's really helpful.

I was also hoping for some responses from people with personal experience.


Quoting Cmgmqmmom:

 I went ahead and just googled that for you.


http://www.piedmont.org/medical-care/living-better1/Your-doctor-The-difference-between-an-MD-and-DO-697.aspx


 


If you see a primary care physician for your general healthcare, there’s a chance you’re seeing a D.O., not an M.D. While both degrees mean your doctor is a licensed physician, their training differs slightly and each has a unique perspective on care. As Brian Krachman, D.O., an internal medicine specialist at Piedmont Physicians Group, explains, “A D.O. is an osteopathic physician, while an M.D. is a medical doctor, an allopathic physician.” According to the American Osteopathic Association, doctors of osteopathic medicine regard the body as an integrated whole, rather than treating for specific symptoms only.  Allopathic medicine, also referred to as “Western medicine,” treats disease symptoms using remedies such as drugs or surgery. Physicians with a D.O. are licensed in all 50 states to practice medicine and surgery, as well as to prescribe medications. The education for both degrees is similar and both are required to complete accredited medical residencies.  One major difference is D.O. programs place an emphasis on primary care. “Most D.O.s are in internal medicine, family practice, pediatrics, OB-GYN and general surgery,” says Dr. Krachman. “We spend a lot of time with people. The emphasis – which we call primary care now – is on people.” Osteopathic medical schools also require additional classes – between 300 and 500 hours – on the skeletal system and the interactions of your body with diseases. Dr. Krachman says there may be slight personality differences between physicians with each degree, as D.O.s often address medical conditions from both a medical and lifestyle perspective. D.O.s place an emphasis on getting to know a patient’s lifestyle, family and unique concerns, which better informs their medical treatments. However, he says patients should not see much of a difference between the two in terms of medical care. D.O.s are trained to ask questions like this to gain a comprehensive understanding of a patient’s lifestyle, which can impact their condition.   With chronic diseases like diabetes, it’s not only about the medication you’re taking, but “what are you are eating, who’s at home, how meals are prepared and who’s preparing the meals,” he says.  “It’s a supplemental layer that provides you with more opportunity to get better patient care.”

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