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IEP means dont even try?

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 123 Replies
If your child has an IEP stating for longer assignments they can use a laptop or have the assignment adjusted, who decides what is a "long" assignment? And if the child never tries longer work how will they ever learn to do things that don't come easily?
Posted by Anonymous on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:38 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:41 PM
I wonder how the teacher is supposed to remember everything on EACH kids IEP in her classroom. Does she have to consult the files before she can handle ANY situation?
Sisika4585
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:43 PM
2 moms liked this
My sons resourse teacher says he shouldnt work more than an hour on a assignment, if i feel hes done his best and didnt finish 3 out of 12 problems then i can cross some off for him. That being said he knows this and since sept i have only done this less than a handful of times. I guess it all depends on how well your child is trying. My son does his very best and his teachers tell me this all the time. My son is in 5th grade.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:44 PM

If you read the entire post, you would see where the OP's child has MD. It is physically too hard on her body to write 100 sentences.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 4 on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:44 PM
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IEP's are not easy to get. If a kid has shortened assignments it's because they need it. That shorter assignment is still going to take that kid 2-3 times as long to complete as 'regular' kid.

It's no different than a kid who needs crutches to get around or a kid who needs glasses to see the board. You wouldn't take that stuff away and tell them to try harder.
j3st3r
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:44 PM
1 mom liked this
IEP's are very specific. A "major" assignment would be defined throughout the document.

IEP's are also individualized to the student. If college is a goal, there will be a progression as the child ages. Students are accommodated depending on how their symptoms impact the classroom environment.

Accommodations are also available in college, though they are appropriate to the setting.
j3st3r
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:45 PM
1 mom liked this
Most schools have a system of identifying accommodations. Special education teachers and related service providers also provide support.

Quoting Anonymous 2: I wonder how the teacher is supposed to remember everything on EACH kids IEP in her classroom. Does she have to consult the files before she can handle ANY situation?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:46 PM
You are right that I did use another posters IEP detail, the post isn't about her, just made me think about IEPs more. I wonder how exactly it works.

Quoting Anonymous 3:

If you read the entire post, you would see where the OP's child has MD. It is physically too hard on her body to write 100 sentences.

Sisika4585
by on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:47 PM
2 moms liked this
Actually yes after a few weeks the teacher remembers which kid has exceptions with their assignments. She knows which kids go to the resource rooms and which kid is allergic to whatever it is.

Quoting Anonymous 2: I wonder how the teacher is supposed to remember everything on EACH kids IEP in her classroom. Does she have to consult the files before she can handle ANY situation?
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:48 PM
That's an interesting way of looking at it. The only thing I disagree about is the IEP being easy to get. In our community it is too easy.

Quoting Anonymous 4: IEP's are not easy to get. If a kid has shortened assignments it's because they need it. That shorter assignment is still going to take that kid 2-3 times as long to complete as 'regular' kid.

It's no different than a kid who needs crutches to get around or a kid who needs glasses to see the board. You wouldn't take that stuff away and tell them to try harder.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jan. 14, 2015 at 7:51 PM
1 mom liked this
This answers a lot of my questions, thank you.

Quoting j3st3r: IEP's are very specific. A "major" assignment would be defined throughout the document.

IEP's are also individualized to the student. If college is a goal, there will be a progression as the child ages. Students are accommodated depending on how their symptoms impact the classroom environment.

Accommodations are also available in college, though they are appropriate to the setting.
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