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think I have ppd

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 4 Replies
I haven't been diagnosed with ppd after I had ds. Never had it with my 2 year old.

From last week aND up till today I have been feeling depressed. Everything that I do or say I break down and cry. Even dh trys to flirt with me I get all bent out of shape. When I trt to put dd down for bbed at night I get mad. When ds freaKS out and cry I get upset when I do or try everything in power to make him happy.

I have actually had to set ds down in his crib and walk away and cry.

My dh noticed it today. Thursday comes I am getting checked for it by my primary doctor. And I'm hoping she will gI've me good information about good therapists in my area so I can go and talk to someone.

Has any one else have this or had ppd?
Posted by Anonymous on Jan. 20, 2015 at 4:03 PM
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Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Jan. 20, 2015 at 4:04 PM

Signs and symptoms of depression after childbirth vary, depending on the type of depression.

Baby blues symptoms

Signs and symptoms of the baby blues — which last only a few days to a week or two — may include:

  • Mood swings
  • Anxiety
  • Sadness
  • Irritability
  • Crying
  • Decreased concentration
  • Trouble sleeping

Postpartum depression symptoms

Postpartum depression may appear to be the baby blues at first — but the signs and symptoms are more intense and longer lasting, eventually interfering with your ability to care for your baby and handle other daily tasks. Postpartum depression symptoms may include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Insomnia
  • Intense irritability and anger
  • Overwhelming fatigue
  • Loss of interest in sex
  • Lack of joy in life
  • Feelings of shame, guilt or inadequacy
  • Severe mood swings
  • Difficulty bonding with your baby
  • Withdrawal from family and friends
  • Thoughts of harming yourself or your baby

Untreated, postpartum depression may last for many months or longer.

Postpartum psychosis

With postpartum psychosis — a rare condition that typically develops within the first two weeks after delivery — the signs and symptoms are even more severe. Signs and symptoms of postpartum psychosis may include:

  • Confusion and disorientation
  • Hallucinations and delusions
  • Paranoia
  • Attempts to harm yourself or your baby

When to see a doctor

If you're feeling depressed after your baby's birth, you may be reluctant or embarrassed to admit it. But it's important to call your doctor if the signs and symptoms of depression have any of these features:

  • Don't fade after two weeks
  • Are getting worse
  • Make it hard for you to care for your baby
  • Make it hard to complete everyday tasks
  • Include thoughts of harming yourself or your baby

If you suspect that you're developing postpartum psychosis, seek medical attention immediately. Don't wait and hope for improvement. Postpartum psychosis may lead to life-threatening thoughts or behaviors.

blessed107
by Diamond Member on Jan. 20, 2015 at 4:04 PM

Bump. Never had it. Hope you get the right answers. Good luck!

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Jan. 20, 2015 at 4:05 PM

If you have signs and symptoms of postpartum depression, call your doctor. Don't let shame or anxiety stop you. Postpartum depression is common, and your doctor knows it's not your fault. To protect your health and the health of your baby, the condition needs to be treated as soon as possible.

After your first appointment, your doctor may refer you to a mental health provider who can create the right treatment plan for you.

Here's some information to help you prepare for your appointment and what to expect from your doctor.

What you can do

  • Write down any symptoms you've been experiencing and for how long.
  • Write down all of your medical issues, including other physical or mental health conditions with which you've been diagnosed. Tell your doctor if you've been diagnosed with any type of depression or other mental health disorder in the past.
  • Make a list of all the medications you take, including over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.
  • Find a trusted family member or friend to join you for your appointment to help you remember all of the information discussed.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask a doctor who sees you for possible postpartum depression include:

  • What is my diagnosis?
  • What treatments are likely to help in my case?
  • What are the possible side effects of the treatments you're proposing?
  • How much and how soon do you expect my symptoms to improve with treatment?
  • Is the medication you're prescribing safe to take while breast-feeding?
  • How long will I need to be treated?
  • What lifestyle changes can help me manage my symptoms?
  • How often should I be seen for follow-up visits?
  • Am I at increased risk of other mental health problems?
  • Am I at risk of this condition recurring if I have another baby?
  • Is there any way to prevent a recurrence if I have another baby?
  • Are there any printed materials that I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask for more information at any time if you don't understand something.

What to expect from your doctor

A doctor or mental health provider who sees you for possible postpartum depression may ask:

  • What are your symptoms, and when did they first start?
  • Have your symptoms been getting better or worse over time?
  • Are your symptoms affecting your ability to care for your baby?
  • Do you feel as bonded to your baby as you expected?
  • Are you able to sleep when you have the chance and get out of bed when it's time to wake up?
  • How would you describe your energy level?
  • Has your appetite changed?
  • How often would you say you feel anxious, irritable or angry?
  • Have you had any thoughts of harming yourself or your baby?
  • How much support do you have in caring for your baby?
  • How much stress are you otherwise under, such as financial or relationship problems?
  • Have you been diagnosed with any other medical conditions, including mental illnesses such as depression or bipolar disorder?
  • Have you been treated for other psychiatric symptoms or mental illness in the past? If so, what type of therapy helped the most?

What you can do in the meantime

While you wait for your appointment with your doctor, try to open up to the people close to you and let them know you need help. If someone offers to baby-sit so that you can take a break, take them up on it. If you can sleep, take a nap. Catch a movie or meet for coffee with friends. Breaking the isolation may help you feel human again.

If at any point you have thoughts of harming yourself or your baby, immediately give your baby to your partner or another loved one and call 911 or your local emergency assistance number.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jan. 20, 2015 at 4:12 PM
I will be going to the doctors on Thursday dh is coming with me.

Quoting Anonymous 2:

If you have signs and symptoms of postpartum depression, call your doctor. Don't let shame or anxiety stop you. Postpartum depression is common, and your doctor knows it's not your fault. To protect your health and the health of your baby, the condition needs to be treated as soon as possible.

After your first appointment, your doctor may refer you to a mental health provider who can create the right treatment plan for you.

Here's some information to help you prepare for your appointment and what to expect from your doctor.

What you can do

  • Write down any symptoms you've been experiencing and for how long.
  • Write down all of your medical issues, including other physical or mental health conditions with which you've been diagnosed. Tell your doctor if you've been diagnosed with any type of depression or other mental health disorder in the past.
  • Make a list of all the medications you take, including over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.
  • Find a trusted family member or friend to join you for your appointment to help you remember all of the information discussed.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask a doctor who sees you for possible postpartum depression include:

  • What is my diagnosis?
  • What treatments are likely to help in my case?
  • What are the possible side effects of the treatments you're proposing?
  • How much and how soon do you expect my symptoms to improve with treatment?
  • Is the medication you're prescribing safe to take while breast-feeding?
  • How long will I need to be treated?
  • What lifestyle changes can help me manage my symptoms?
  • How often should I be seen for follow-up visits?
  • Am I at increased risk of other mental health problems?
  • Am I at risk of this condition recurring if I have another baby?
  • Is there any way to prevent a recurrence if I have another baby?
  • Are there any printed materials that I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask for more information at any time if you don't understand something.

What to expect from your doctor

A doctor or mental health provider who sees you for possible postpartum depression may ask:

  • What are your symptoms, and when did they first start?
  • Have your symptoms been getting better or worse over time?
  • Are your symptoms affecting your ability to care for your baby?
  • Do you feel as bonded to your baby as you expected?
  • Are you able to sleep when you have the chance and get out of bed when it's time to wake up?
  • How would you describe your energy level?
  • Has your appetite changed?
  • How often would you say you feel anxious, irritable or angry?
  • Have you had any thoughts of harming yourself or your baby?
  • How much support do you have in caring for your baby?
  • How much stress are you otherwise under, such as financial or relationship problems?
  • Have you been diagnosed with any other medical conditions, including mental illnesses such as depression or bipolar disorder?
  • Have you been treated for other psychiatric symptoms or mental illness in the past? If so, what type of therapy helped the most?

What you can do in the meantime

While you wait for your appointment with your doctor, try to open up to the people close to you and let them know you need help. If someone offers to baby-sit so that you can take a break, take them up on it. If you can sleep, take a nap. Catch a movie or meet for coffee with friends. Breaking the isolation may help you feel human again.

If at any point you have thoughts of harming yourself or your baby, immediately give your baby to your partner or another loved one and call 911 or your local emergency assistance number.

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