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Need help - son under severe depression, I might be the reason.

Posted by on Feb. 4, 2015 at 12:10 AM
  • 2 Replies


I'm concerned about my son, who is 7 yrs now. He is now very aggressive and angry at everything. I know the reason and somehow I'm a reason for that. I've filed for divorce because of some of his unacceptable acts. The case is still in courts and Yousefi Law Group http://yfamilylaw.ca/ is taking care of the procedures. I had to do it for the good of my child and me. But my son won't understand it and he thinks that I've scared his father away. Now, he doesn't eat much, sometimes I hear voices of him breaking stuff. For now, my cousin comes by to take care of him, because he doesn't wanna see me. I don't know I hate this; I want my child to be with me. I don't know what to do? Can anyone please hel p me on this?

by on Feb. 4, 2015 at 12:10 AM
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BmoreRavens
by Raven on Feb. 4, 2015 at 12:18 AM

Your son needs to see a doctor for a complete evaluation, and the doctor will most likely advise that your child see a therapist or a life coach.

What are all of the reasons that you feel that you are responsible for your son's depression/behavior?


BmoreRavens
by Raven on Feb. 4, 2015 at 1:01 AM

What Angry Kids Need: Parenting Your Angry Child Without Going Mad Paperback – by Jennifer Anne Brown

A child screams. A door slams. I hate you! is yelled again. You know someone has been hit, or the doghas been kicked, or toys have been broken. Is this your child or a child you work with? Then you may find the help for both of you in What Angry Kids Need: Parenting Your Angry Child Without Going Mad. 

Anger experts Jennifer Anne Brown and Pam Provonsha Hopkins, western Washington counselors who have worked with angry children their entire careers, have written what has already been described as a comprehensive look at children s anger. 

In language every parent, caregiver and teacher can understand (even when exhausted and frustrated), it explains why kids get angry, what anger management skills they (and the entire family) can be taught, how adults can model anger management techniques and how adults can cope when nothing seems to work. The authors, who emphasize the importance of patience and practice in developing the ability to handle anger, also explain the options available when more help is needed.

Amazon

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