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What to do, what to do.

Posted by on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:50 PM
  • 16 Replies
My DD is 1. We went to urgent care last night and it sends she had an infection in her finger. We got her to take her antibiotics lady night but come today she just won't take it. She either clenches her jaw and won't let the syringe on our she gets a mouth full and apps it out. It's that nasty cherry flavor. We have tried putting it in Hawaiian punch, strawberry milk apple juice and yogurt. I am at a loss. Any ideas on how to get her to take it would be great
by on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:50 PM
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Replies (1-10):
incogNinja
by Whofflé on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:51 PM
1 mom liked this
Yeah you lay her down and use a syringe. It's not icky vitamin drops or something this is a legit SHE HAS TO. Shove it into the side of her mouth and trickle a little bit down at a time.
o.O....
by Cara on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:53 PM
When dd2 was a baby she needed medicine multiple times a day. We had to push the syringe all the way to the back of her mouth, between her cheek and jaw.
tecnogroovymom
by Bronze Member on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:54 PM
They gave this huge syringe. Should I go buy a smaller one
Danesmommy1
by Grammar Enthusiast on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:55 PM
You kinda have to shoot it down her throat.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:55 PM

This.
It won't be fun, but it has to be done.

Quoting incogNinja: Yeah you lay her down and use a syringe. It's not icky vitamin drops or something this is a legit SHE HAS TO. Shove it into the side of her mouth and trickle a little bit down at a time.


that_mom_mary
by on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:56 PM
Yep this. We've all been there at one point or another.

Quoting incogNinja: Yeah you lay her down and use a syringe. It's not icky vitamin drops or something this is a legit SHE HAS TO. Shove it into the side of her mouth and trickle a little bit down at a time.
Sassy762
by CAFE SASSY HBIC on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:56 PM

Put on a Happy Face

"Taking prescription medicine is like any other thing you want your child to do," Dr. Altmann says. "Act positive about it. Talk about 'medicine time' like it's an enjoyable thing. Kids can pick up on negative tone and body language." Alissa Robinson, of Colorado Springs, discovered a way to help ease the stress of medicine time. "I don't let my 10-month-old see the medicine," she says. "I lay her on the floor, cover her eyes a couple of times playing peekaboo, then cover her eyes again while I put the syringe in her mouth. She swallows before she knows what happened."


Bypass the Taste Buds

Kids tend to spit out bitter-tasting meds. To avoid this, some parents continue to use syringes and droppers even when their children are old enough to drink out of a cup. "I always use a syringe so I can squirt the medicine along the inside of my kid's cheeks and keep it off the tongue," says Blossom Ruso, a very experienced mother of six from Santa Cruz, California. To do it correctly, slide the syringe or dropper along the cheek, toward the back of the mouth, and squeeze it slowly, recommends Christopher Tolcher, MD, assistant clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Southern California. Or you can rest a dropper halfway back on the tongue and have your child suck on it

Disguise the Taste

Your pharmacist can add flavors such as chocolate, root beer, and watermelon to liquid meds for just a few extra bucks. "Sarah was on antibiotics for five months straight when she was just over 1 year old -- every day!" says Heather Greene, of Emmaus, Pennsylvania. "Luckily, we had her amoxicillin flavored, and she liked it. She called it her 'moxie.'" Even OTC meds can be flavored by your pharmacist -- the cherry taste of a cough medicine can be masked by a banana flavor your child prefers.

 

Have Them Chill Out

"I give my 5-year-old son ice and have him suck on it for a bit before giving him his medicine," says Gail Mithoff, of Mission Viejo, California. "It helps numb his taste buds so the medicine goes down smoothly." Use ice chips, since larger pieces are a choking hazard, and only for older kids. An ice pop also works well. Or you could put the medicine in the fridge. "Some, like steroids, have a bitter edge and taste better cold," Dr. Tolcher says.



Try a different delivery. Delivery can make all the difference. So if your toddler has already turned up her nose at the medicine spoon, try giving her the medication in a medicine dropper. You might also ask the pharmacist for a plastic syringe (sans the needle!) that squirts out liquid meds, or a small cup (make sure it offers exact measurements so you can dose properly) — or another measuring device you think your child might be willing to try. Any variation in your approach may distract her enough to get a dose in.

Break it up. Give your toddler small amounts of medicine over several minutes instead of all at once. It may be easier to swallow if she doesn’t have to down it all in one gulp. Of course, if your kid feels that this strategy is merely prolonging the agony, this option isn’t for you.

Hide it. Ask your doctor if it’s okay to sneak the particular medicine into foods or drinks. If you get the thumbs-up on that, stir the medicine into a small amount of applesauce, ice cream, or fruit juice. (Applesauce à la penicillin isn’t half bad.) But remember, if you do mix the meds into something else, your toddler needs to eat or drink the whole thing in order to get the full dosage.

Take the right aim. Taste buds are concentrated on the front and center of the tongue, so bypass those finicky taste zones by placing the medicine near the back of her tongue. Or try dropping it between the rear gum and the inside of her cheek, where it will easily glide down her throat with minimal contact with taste buds. (Yes, this requires a bit of skill, and maybe an extra set of hands to keep your toddler still while you perfect your dunk shot.)

Offer a treat. A little bribery can go a long way in this instance. Promise your child a small but special prize in return for taking her medicine. Stickers or a little trinket might inspire her to open wide.

Watch your reaction. Even if you’re feeling bad about forcing your tot to drink something she detests, don’t apologize for it. Be matter of fact about it, or even cheerful (if you can pull it off) because this will signal to your toddler that taking medicine isn’t a hardship. And don’t let your facial expressions give you away either. Trying to get your toddler to take medicine with a grimace on your face will clue her in to the fact that she’s in for something unpleasant.

Give her a say. Empower your child by lettering her choose between different flavors or colors of medicine if you have the option. That way she’ll feel like she has some control over the situation.

Add a flavorful twist. Ask your pharmacist if she can mask the taste of the yucky-tasting liquid with a better-tasting flavoring such as FLAVORx. The flavorings (ranging from root beer to tangerine) are FDA-approved and medically designed to combat the bad taste and smell of liquid medicines. It may be the answer to your medicine-taking troubles.

 

TediLee
by on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:58 PM

Cover her mouth and force her to swallow. It's NOT her choice. I would slap her hard as I could on the leg the FIRST time she pulled that and shove the syringe in her mouth while she cried and tell her you take this or I will spank you for being a bad girl again and do it. She's going to end up in the hospital if she doesn't take it and you're letting her waste it. SLAP her leg hard so she knows disobedience will result in pain plus she will have to do what you say because you're MOM not playmate and that's that. No it's not abuse, letting her child control things is because she'll end up in the hospital because mommy let her take charge.

Retrokitty
by Jasmyne on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:59 PM
Chocolate pudding
chicklopez
by ItsFunnierInEnochian on Feb. 27, 2015 at 5:59 PM

like dane's said, you have to shoot it down their throat, just a little at a time. 

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