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Ever heard of it? Transient Synovitis

Posted by on Mar. 16, 2015 at 11:55 PM
  • 15 Replies

Me either until today!

My nine year old was crying like crazy yesterday night her knee hurt so bad! It was so sudden and out of the blue! The doctor at the Same Daycare center kept asking if she did this, did you fall yadda yadda we were like no nothing only thing we can think of is she got out of the car maybe landed wrong?> But still didnt hurt until two hours later?

Crazy though because she was feeling a little better later in the day. Around bedtime started hurting again. She has crutches has to stay off it until the swelling and fluid goes down. Wonder how many other people and kids have had this?

by on Mar. 16, 2015 at 11:55 PM
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Replies (1-10):
thetrollcat
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:08 AM

BUMP!

j3st3r
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:11 AM
TC, can I ask you a totally unrelated question? About Deaf Ed?
thetrollcat
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:15 AM

sure....

Quoting j3st3r: TC, can I ask you a totally unrelated question? About Deaf Ed?


j3st3r
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:19 AM
Do you think public schools do enough to provide a language rich environment for deaf and hard of hearing kids?

I got into a *spirited* debate yesterday with my Literacy Ed instructor.

*I* feel like deaf kids are being seriously shorted. They get 1 (interpreter) or maybe 2 (deaf Ed teacher) language models in the public school setting.

Reading is all about language. That's being drilled into us as future specialty teachers. But they're emphasizing ORAL language only.

I've worked ten years as an interpreter. 5 in K12, 3 in higher Ed and 5 in VRS (they overlap). I refuse to do a Deaf Ed endorsement because I feel like this area is AUDIST!

Do you find that to be true? Or am I crazy? 'Cause they were definitely looking at me likei was crazy.


Quoting thetrollcat:

sure....

Quoting j3st3r: TC, can I ask you a totally unrelated question? About Deaf Ed?

thetrollcat
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:34 AM

ya know I think every community is slightly different regards to how the hard of hearing and deaf is handled in the public schools. of course in my state they push parents to send their kids to Great Falls blind/deaf school where they are taught to speak using SEE.... Problem with that is many come out of that school unable to read or comprehend past grade school level minus their language skills.

The issue with public schools is that it is designed for kids without disabilities.... Im not sure that HH or Deaf kids can really keep up with the class level/rate in a public school language/reading wise. I know for me I had to attend public school that supported classes for the deaf/HH, regular class, then speech therapy on the side. I did learn how to speak and they encouraged full speaking and sentence structures, I was still behind in my reading and vocabulary. 

I think too often teachers, parents, and the HH/deaf simply forget that the hearing people learn twice the vocabulary not because they learned MORE in school. Because the other half they hear it outside school. This is a huge disadvantage for the HH/deaf.

The funny thing is, since the internet growth and spending time on CM, I am actually shocked how many hearing people still cannot spell or pronounce words or use words correctly! Overall I have increased my vocabulary and reading level just being online alone. 

Public schools are barely meeting the requirements to properly teach regular kids, I dont think that they meet the requirement to help a kid with a disability stay at the same level. It doesnt matter if they have HH/deaf classes, tutors, interpreters.

Quoting j3st3r: Do you think public schools do enough to provide a language rich environment for deaf and hard of hearing kids? I got into a *spirited* debate yesterday with my Literacy Ed instructor. *I* feel like deaf kids are being seriously shorted. They get 1 (interpreter) or maybe 2 (deaf Ed teacher) language models in the public school setting. Reading is all about language. That's being drilled into us as future specialty teachers. But they're emphasizing ORAL language only. I've worked ten years as an interpreter. 5 in K12, 3 in higher Ed and 5 in VRS (they overlap). I refuse to do a Deaf Ed endorsement because I feel like this area is AUDIST! Do you find that to be true? Or am I crazy? 'Cause they were definitely looking at me likei was crazy.
Quoting thetrollcat:

sure....

Quoting j3st3r: TC, can I ask you a totally unrelated question? About Deaf Ed?


VibeRant
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:41 AM

I haven't heard of that either. My son bumped his hand on a desk about a wk ago. It was just a little bump. His hand swelled as if he'd hit something with his fist. Bruised really bad so we took him for an x-ray (had to demand it). Nothing broken and received zero diagnosis, just a brace for his hand. Our ER sucks. 

j3st3r
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:41 AM
That breaks my heart. It really does. Because here, in VA, there is only one school for the deaf. 90+% of deaf and hard of hearing kids go to public schools.

You're right. Hearing people graduate, on average, with a sixth-eighth grade reading level. Deaf high school graduates tend to be closer to fourth.

My instructor said that if I feel so strongly, I should "be the change," but how?

The graduate programs teach you the mainstream with supports model. They push oral language. CI's and hearing aids and FM systems.

The school systems have one or two deaf Ed teachers pet county who follow the same models they learned in graduate school.

I'm not saying those aren't great tools, but dammit kids need a FIRST language before you go pushing a second.

I


Quoting thetrollcat:

ya know I think every community is slightly different regards to how the hard of hearing and deaf is handled in the public schools. of course in my state they push parents to send their kids to Great Falls blind/deaf school where they are taught to speak using SEE.... Problem with that is many come out of that school unable to read or comprehend past grade school level minus their language skills.

The issue with public schools is that it is designed for kids without disabilities.... Im not sure that HH or Deaf kids can really keep up with the class level/rate in a public school language/reading wise. I know for me I had to attend public school that supported classes for the deaf/HH, regular class, then speech therapy on the side. I did learn how to speak and they encouraged full speaking and sentence structures, I was still behind in my reading and vocabulary. 

I think too often teachers, parents, and the HH/deaf simply forget that the hearing people learn twice the vocabulary not because they learned MORE in school. Because the other half they hear it outside school. This is a huge disadvantage for the HH/deaf.

The funny thing is, since the internet growth and spending time on CM, I am actually shocked how many hearing people still cannot spell or pronounce words or use words correctly! Overall I have increased my vocabulary and reading level just being online alone. 

Public schools are barely meeting the requirements to properly teach regular kids, I dont think that they meet the requirement to help a kid with a disability stay at the same level. It doesnt matter if they have HH/deaf classes, tutors, interpreters.

Quoting j3st3r: Do you think public schools do enough to provide a language rich environment for deaf and hard of hearing kids?

I got into a *spirited* debate yesterday with my Literacy Ed instructor.

*I* feel like deaf kids are being seriously shorted. They get 1 (interpreter) or maybe 2 (deaf Ed teacher) language models in the public school setting.

Reading is all about language. That's being drilled into us as future specialty teachers. But they're emphasizing ORAL language only.

I've worked ten years as an interpreter. 5 in K12, 3 in higher Ed and 5 in VRS (they overlap). I refuse to do a Deaf Ed endorsement because I feel like this area is AUDIST!

Do you find that to be true? Or am I crazy? 'Cause they were definitely looking at me likei was crazy.


Quoting thetrollcat:

sure....

Quoting j3st3r: TC, can I ask you a totally unrelated question? About Deaf Ed?

chefmartha
by Platinum Member on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:43 AM

Just looked it up. Sounds like something that my baby brother had as a little kid. Only then the doctor explained it as a 'cold' in his hip. He had to stay off it, luckily he was still small enough for my mom to carry when necessary. I think he had it like twice. He was three the first time and like 5 or 6 the second.

thetrollcat
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:49 AM

Well see that is the point of my reply... How do you fit in what others learn outside school in a school routine? You cant. Fact that deaf/hard of hearing are missing out on what happens outside the class room is unfortunate and often ignored. People are so busy trying to blame the schools for the lack of and sure they are lacking a lot of things for all kids not just HH/Deaf but the fact is kids with hearing have more advantage... Take a blind person for example... They simply cannot see. While you can teach a blind person the same materials using braille lets face it, half the kids see and know more because they can see OUTSIDE class time... Blind people would need additional time outside class time to learn what others learned outside class.

NOT Everything is taught in schools or class rooms. As kids we are constantly learning everywhere we go. Many take sports, dance, this that and learnign more vocabulary outside classroom. Again more disadvantages to the HH/deaf because in dance they dont have interpreters or special classes for the deaf well some do but you see what Im saying here?

I think sign language NEEDS to be the first second language for all HH/Deaf it should be a must shouldnt even be an option. They should learn it because you never know when it will be a benefit to them when they enter college or a job or so. They need to learn it. They say sign language is fading due to technology... Part of that is true why? Because people/parents think that technology is going to replace hand sign as if its a better deal. I DISAGREE. I will forever disagree with that. That is shitty to think that deaf people need a fucking device in their face to help them communicate for the rest of their lives! UM NO!!!! Thats a hell no! I want to continue to be able to speak face to face to a human not a damn machine. PEOPLE are over looking that.

If they master sign and english I have no issues with them learning another language. It could be beneficial but it certainly WONT help make up for what they miss out on outside school,

Quoting j3st3r: That breaks my heart. It really does. Because here, in VA, there is only one school for the deaf. 90+% of deaf and hard of hearing kids go to public schools. You're right. Hearing people graduate, on average, with a sixth-eighth grade reading level. Deaf high school graduates tend to be closer to fourth. My instructor said that if I feel so strongly, I should "be the change," but how? The graduate programs teach you the mainstream with supports model. They push oral language. CI's and hearing aids and FM systems. The school systems have one or two deaf Ed teachers pet county who follow the same models they learned in graduate school. I'm not saying those aren't great tools, but dammit kids need a FIRST language before you go pushing a second. I
Quoting thetrollcat:

ya know I think every community is slightly different regards to how the hard of hearing and deaf is handled in the public schools. of course in my state they push parents to send their kids to Great Falls blind/deaf school where they are taught to speak using SEE.... Problem with that is many come out of that school unable to read or comprehend past grade school level minus their language skills.

The issue with public schools is that it is designed for kids without disabilities.... Im not sure that HH or Deaf kids can really keep up with the class level/rate in a public school language/reading wise. I know for me I had to attend public school that supported classes for the deaf/HH, regular class, then speech therapy on the side. I did learn how to speak and they encouraged full speaking and sentence structures, I was still behind in my reading and vocabulary. 

I think too often teachers, parents, and the HH/deaf simply forget that the hearing people learn twice the vocabulary not because they learned MORE in school. Because the other half they hear it outside school. This is a huge disadvantage for the HH/deaf.

The funny thing is, since the internet growth and spending time on CM, I am actually shocked how many hearing people still cannot spell or pronounce words or use words correctly! Overall I have increased my vocabulary and reading level just being online alone. 

Public schools are barely meeting the requirements to properly teach regular kids, I dont think that they meet the requirement to help a kid with a disability stay at the same level. It doesnt matter if they have HH/deaf classes, tutors, interpreters.

Quoting j3st3r: Do you think public schools do enough to provide a language rich environment for deaf and hard of hearing kids? I got into a *spirited* debate yesterday with my Literacy Ed instructor. *I* feel like deaf kids are being seriously shorted. They get 1 (interpreter) or maybe 2 (deaf Ed teacher) language models in the public school setting. Reading is all about language. That's being drilled into us as future specialty teachers. But they're emphasizing ORAL language only. I've worked ten years as an interpreter. 5 in K12, 3 in higher Ed and 5 in VRS (they overlap). I refuse to do a Deaf Ed endorsement because I feel like this area is AUDIST! Do you find that to be true? Or am I crazy? 'Cause they were definitely looking at me likei was crazy.
Quoting thetrollcat:

sure....

Quoting j3st3r: TC, can I ask you a totally unrelated question? About Deaf Ed?


thetrollcat
by on Mar. 17, 2015 at 8:49 AM

wow I hope mine doesnt have it that long or often!

Quoting chefmartha:

Just looked it up. Sounds like something that my baby brother had as a little kid. Only then the doctor explained it as a 'cold' in his hip. He had to stay off it, luckily he was still small enough for my mom to carry when necessary. I think he had it like twice. He was three the first time and like 5 or 6 the second.


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