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Nurses/RNs. Questions.

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 11 Replies
So I'm VERY on the fence about going in to nursing.
I've was a dialysis tech, I liked it well enough and was praised by my coworkers and the RNs for doing so well. But I got to the point where it was giving me anxiety. The possibility of doing the wrong thing.
There were so many chances, wrong dialysate, wrong pump speed, puncturing a fistula etc.
Granted it make me check everything well, but it got to the point I would start getting anxiety burps an hour before work, all through work and and hour after. They were bad enough my patients noticed.
I didn't quit because of it though. We moved and I couldn't get another job doing that.

Nursing has always been something I've thought about and even still, but it scares me. I love caring for people, I'm extremely calm and clear headed in emergencys, but it scares me to think I could hurt someone or do the unthinkable accidently.

I need to know if this is something everyone goes through in deciding this is a career for them. Does that feeling/fear ever subside( I'm sure some awareness of it is good)?
Posted by Anonymous on May. 5, 2015 at 2:40 AM
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Replies (1-10):
missmars786
by Silver Member on May. 5, 2015 at 2:43 AM
Bump. I was going to post the same thing, lol.
Racer15
by Silver Member on May. 5, 2015 at 2:45 AM
There are a lot of areas you can go into that aren't as high stress. It gets better but there are still going to be days that are massively anxiety inducing no matter how good you are at your job.
Poosaloosa
by Gold Member on May. 5, 2015 at 6:58 AM
My sister does home hemo on her husband since they live so far from a center. And I often help. It is horribly nerve wracking. I can't imagine doing it on multiple patients a day!
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on May. 5, 2015 at 7:01 AM

The stressors would be the same.  There are other fields like occupational therapy that might not be as stress ridden.  2-4 year degree-decent money-growing field and you can't really kill anyone-worst thing you could do   i s not improve them as much as you should.

Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on May. 5, 2015 at 7:05 AM
If you can't handle being a tech, I would think stepping up to a higher level of responsibility isn't for you.
brimar
by Silver Member on May. 5, 2015 at 7:33 AM
You gain confidence as you go. I know I was worried about this but I came as second nature.
I am not a nurse but qualified to work in an ER.

I was also freaked out about blood and a germaphobe before I went to school. I faced my fears a little at a time.
SusanD
by Gold Member on May. 5, 2015 at 7:43 AM
I'll be completely honest.... Being cautious, and knowing that something can go wrong is healthy. Being fearful of doing your job, or having anxiety related to providing care is not healthy. As a nurse you will have stressors and will give meds that are potentially deadly. Be it that you are giving cardizem in an attempt to cardiovert a patient, giving blood products and monitoring for reaction, or giving something as simple as potassium IV.... If you cannot perform these functions without anxiety, then maybe nursing isn't the field for you.

Having said that, only you know if this is something you can work through and with proper training and education, if you could do the job without anxiety. Good luck in your decision.
brimar
by Silver Member on May. 5, 2015 at 7:47 AM
Now remember, as a nurse you only give meds a doc tells you too. You are following orders. Anything dangerous or high dose will be checked by 2 RNs usually, not just one.

You are not having to make these calls on your own. You just make sure you check and double check.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 5, 2015 at 11:47 AM
It wasn't really that, I still did my job just fine, it never effected my patient interaction in a negative way. So the anxiety didn't change how I did my job in a negative way, it was just there.
Higher responsibility is usually bright with more time and education and experience. So I would hope(and was asking) if that alleviates some of that anxiety.

It's a good possibility that a higher level isn't for me, your right.

Quoting Anonymous 3: If you can't handle being a tech, I would think stepping up to a higher level of responsibility isn't for you.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on May. 5, 2015 at 11:54 AM
Thank you for your reply :)

It was a weird feeling because I would have all these feelings but then I would do what ever task and that fear went away AS I was doing it and every thing was fine. Maybe it was just a lack of confidence.


Quoting SusanD: I'll be completely honest.... Being cautious, and knowing that something can go wrong is healthy. Being fearful of doing your job, or having anxiety related to providing care is not healthy. As a nurse you will have stressors and will give meds that are potentially deadly. Be it that you are giving cardizem in an attempt to cardiovert a patient, giving blood products and monitoring for reaction, or giving something as simple as potassium IV.... If you cannot perform these functions without anxiety, then maybe nursing isn't the field for you.

Having said that, only you know if this is something you can work through and with proper training and education, if you could do the job without anxiety. Good luck in your decision.
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